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Thread: I may never make another bed-sized quilt again...

  1. #1
    Junior Member Kryssa's Avatar
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    I own a Janome Magnolia 7330 and I am about to kill everyone in the house at the thought of sitting down to finish quilting a twin XL quilt.

    I'm guessing most of you send your bed quilts to a long arm quilter? But I can't afford that.

    Maybe it wouldn't be as bad if I was just quilting straight lines, but I decided to SITD around some of the shapes.

    I am about half way done. Maybe I will get another quarter done tonight if I can stand to sit down and start. If I could finish the quilting this weekend I would be so happy.

    And I will probably never stray from lap-size and baby quilts again!

  2. #2
    Super Member Theresa's Avatar
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    Maybe quilting it in steps will help. Am sorry this is such a burden...but I also understand!!

  3. #3
    Super Member noveltyjunkie's Avatar
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    My projects always take ages, so to me it sounds like you are making quick progress! Try to set small goals and don't beat yourself up. It will be done and it will be great!

  4. #4
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    Kryssa, do you have anyone who can help you? What I mean is help you with the weight/bulk of the quilt? I FMQ'd a queen sized quilt on my little Viking 425. But I had to get my (now ex-husband) to hold it up for me. It took a little bit of time but eventually we worked out a rhythm

  5. #5
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    I know exactly how you feel!
    I've been trying to make myself finish a king size quilt for over a year.
    From now on, since I can't afford to buy fabric AND pay a longarmer to do the quilting for me, I'll just do QAYG quilts.
    I don't want to give up my favorite pasttime, but the quilting part is a real burden for me.

  6. #6
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    On the larger ones (I SID too), I usually roll them and hold the back part of the roll on my shoulder. Oh what a pain - It is really important to do sections at a time. Your poor muscles won't be stressed, and it is easier to keep the needle IN the ditch. Hang in there.

  7. #7
    Super Member sewmuchmore's Avatar
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    When you are finish you will forget all the pain that went with it. I it like have a baby you are almost there. Take a deep breath and relax before you know you are done.

  8. #8
    iluvquilts's Avatar
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    Feel your pain - my DH wanted a scrappy Queen size quilt - liked he helped (he cut the squares for her) his Mom make 30++ years ago.

    I finally have it pieced and it is really pretty but the quilting part is making me procrastinate - procrastinate etc.!

    Must bite the bullet and get started before cold weather sets in!

    Cindy

  9. #9
    Super Member quilt queen 2's Avatar
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    I bought an old dining room table DH cut a hole and made a shelf so my machine is flush with the top and I wear garden gloves l also use a slider This evolved after I had struggled with 4 queen quilts for X-mas gifts.That was 4 years ago now I don't dread quilting my own quilts!

  10. #10
    Power Poster ckcowl's Avatar
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    just like with everything it takes practice, if you stick with it each quilt will be easier and better until you look back at this one and laugh...remember when, and look at me now...it can be frustrating but it is a learning experience to and remember breaks are important...when i'm working on one that is difficult i set a timer for 45 minutes and when it goes off i have to stop, take a walk, leave the room, get a drink, what ever...stay away for a minimum of 10 minutes then reset the timer and go back. it makes a huge difference when you take breaks, remember to breath, know that the first one is never the best (or easy) and when you go back to it it will go better :)

  11. #11
    Power Poster sharon b's Avatar
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    I understand I fight when I have to quilt also :shock: I try to roll it up as much as I can and keep the rolls tight and moving , can be a big PITA :roll: LOL But worth it when it is done

  12. #12
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    I can relate totally. I had several tops pieced but never could bring myself to quilt them. I know of several long-armers in the area but I had no clue what they charge. Finally, I just decided to try them...I had 3 done last fall...2 queen sized and 1 full...and they cost me a total of about $325 and that included her providing the batting. I have 2 ready to go now and several more in various stages. I understand about limited funds...we have 2 in college right now...but I decided that I would just do 2 or 3 a year. Maybe you could just try having one done now and another one later on?

  13. #13
    RST
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    Instead of rolling the quilt, consider folding it accordian style. Or even just scrunch it up. Also, it's key to have adequate support around it -- I use the dining room table, with a card table or the ironing board set up to the left of the machine to hold the weight of the quilt.

    In my experience, stitch in the ditch is actually one of the harder approaches. It's far easier to to an all over stipple in free motion, or to do a grid or "organic line" quilting. If it's an option with the style and pattern of your quilt, maybe you could transition to that and ditch the SITD.

    RST

  14. #14
    Senior Member Maybe1day's Avatar
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    Gosh I sure feel your pain as i just this week did SID on two place mats as my first attempt of quilting and thought that was bad enough. I usually send my quilts out to a long arm quilter when I am able to. Partly because my previous machine couldn't handle the thickness of the material once a backing and batting were added. Now I have a new machine I have no excuse not to do it myself.
    Funds are more limited now we are both retired so I need to be more frugal which of course means more do it myself :-)

    Maybe1day

  15. #15
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    I'm with you, life is too short to wrestle a big quilt through the throat of a small machine. It's about as much fun as hemorrhoids, in my never-to-be-humble opinion. I save my pennies to send my tops to a LAQ!

  16. #16
    Super Member kwiltkrazy's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Kryssa
    I own a Janome Magnolia 7330 and I am about to kill everyone in the house at the thought of sitting down to finish quilting a twin XL quilt.

    I'm guessing most of you send your bed quilts to a long arm quilter? But I can't afford that.

    Maybe it wouldn't be as bad if I was just quilting straight lines, but I decided to SITD around some of the shapes.

    I am about half way done. Maybe I will get another quarter done tonight if I can stand to sit down and start. If I could finish the quilting this weekend I would be so happy.

    And I will probably never stray from lap-size and baby quilts again!

    What exactly are you having trouble with? I have never sent a quilt out, I can't afford it, and I like to have it done by me, semi-control freak, even though I'm not all that good. But, I have done every size on my Janome 6500, and haven't had a lot of trouble. I like to puddle my quilt around the needle, and not roll the whole thing which is much harder. I first do all my stitch in the ditch, to stabelize it, then I work in sections, that way you're not moving it as much. I also use quilting gloves, which makes it much easier. Please don't give up on bed quilts, it can be done. Have you ever tried quilting it as you go, or quilting it in equal sections, then put the already quilted sections together.

  17. #17
    Super Member lalaland's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by quilt queen 2
    I bought an old dining room table DH cut a hole and made a shelf so my machine is flush with the top and I wear garden gloves l also use a slider This evolved after I had struggled with 4 queen quilts for X-mas gifts.That was 4 years ago now I don't dread quilting my own quilts!
    could you post a picture of your set up.

  18. #18
    Gal
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    I am sure when it is all done you will look back and feel so proud of yourself that you made it, you are just going through a bad time with it at the moment, some times it does pay to have a break from it, rather than rush it through because you are fed up with it. Keep us posted, we are here to keep your spirits up!

    Gal

  19. #19
    arpdesigns28's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Kryssa
    I own a Janome Magnolia 7330 and I am about to kill everyone in the house at the thought of sitting down to finish quilting a twin XL quilt.

    I'm guessing most of you send your bed quilts to a long arm quilter? But I can't afford that.

    Maybe it wouldn't be as bad if I was just quilting straight lines, but I decided to SITD around some of the shapes.

    I am about half way done. Maybe I will get another quarter done tonight if I can stand to sit down and start. If I could finish the quilting this weekend I would be so happy.

    And I will probably never stray from lap-size and baby quilts again!

    Oooooohhhhh, the Stitch in the Ditch, huh? Well, I'm learning the same hard lesson this weekend on a bed-sized quilt that is still incomplete. Don't get discouraged- I read an article about how SITD is really difficult, although it is a simple straight line. I have to draw out the lines with a white chalk pencil to get the stitching right and straight. I will try it and tell you how it works out. Keep going.

  20. #20

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    I have done echo stitching(1/4" on either side of seams) with a walking foot and it works easier for me than SITD. One the last quilt that I made, I used echo stitching, some hand quilting, some free motion quilting, and some quilting through a paper pattern. I marked the chain on a long strip of paper, pinned the paper to my quilt border and stitched rapidly the entire length of the quilt. It worked beautifully.

  21. #21
    Power Poster Tweety2911's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by sewmuchmore
    When you are finish you will forget all the pain that went with it. I it like have a baby you are almost there. Take a deep breath and relax before you know you are done.
    Ditto! Hang in there. Once it is done you will be so happy with yourself!

  22. #22
    Senior Member MomtoBostonTerriers's Avatar
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    I hear you! I feel your pain! And it is a real pain to quilt large projects (pain in the neck, pain in the shoulders, pain in the...).

    I, too, am at the same stage -- working on my first large quilted project, and it is not looking very good. The squiggly lines that should be straight! The 2 inch borders that should be 1 1/2 inch! The skipped stitches! The scrunched up stitches that should be evenly spaced!

    But, I hear in my head many of the comments of quilters on this board noting that it takes practice to learn this skill. So, I'm going to proceed and maybe a dozen quilts from now I will have learned the "secrets" to how to make my own process go easier.

    Don't hate me if I am pleased to find another quilter who feels exactly the same as I do at this stage. Actually, your message has encouraged me. Wish I could give you a nice shoulder massage to encourage you.

  23. #23
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    I did a queen plus last year for my aunt& uncle.She sewed& upholstered all of her life. I told her I was sorry, the quilting was horrible!I really struggled w/the sz. Now in their 80's, she told me it was WONDERFUL!!!! She called and told me, I MUST BE MISTAKEN, ABOUT THE STITCHING;---all 7 of their kids put on the LIST,WHAT I WOULD LIKE WHEN YOU'RE GONE.LOL!!!Guess we all think its worse than it really is!
    Taking breaks is a good idea,but make sure there's a return to quilting dead line,so ya don't give up! HANG IN THERE!!

  24. #24
    Senior Member sewjean's Avatar
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    On my bed size quilts I just do a diaginal or up & down straight lines. Small ones I like to do the SITD. I have done 2 small lap quilts FM & it was fun,not perfect but I didn't try for perfection. lol Good Luck and remember it is suppose to be fun, a little any way.

  25. #25
    Super Member BKrenning's Avatar
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    1. Definitely figure out some way to get the quilt supported around your machine.

    2. Rolling up the edges and clipping them with something helps, too.

    3. Only concentrate on one section at a time.

    4. Baste well. Use spray & pins if necessary. Especially around the edges.

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