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Thread: I may never make another bed-sized quilt again...

  1. #51
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    That's one reason I hand quilt. I roll the quilt up on two 8' long poles that I encased with batting and muslin. Set it on a table and have it extend out to a rail chair and I'm on my way. Works better than a quilting frame as far as I'm concerned. Just roll it up when you're done for the day if you need the space.

    PLUS - I just love, love, love the way hand-quilting looks!

  2. #52
    Junior Member kaygee's Avatar
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    Kryssa,
    I find that I love hand stitching better than machine stritching. I find it very relaxing. And I love to sitd. If my stitches aren't exact, it's ok and also gives me alot of practice for when I do hand stitching where it is noticeable.

  3. #53
    Senior Member rhueluna's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by chance
    That's one reason I hand quilt. I roll the quilt up on two 8' long poles that I encased with batting and muslin. Set it on a table and have it extend out to a rail chair and I'm on my way. Works better than a quilting frame as far as I'm concerned. Just roll it up when you're done for the day if you need the space.

    PLUS - I just love, love, love the way hand-quilting looks!
    Wow, you made up your own frame. It sounds really good. I like to haul mine around and sit on my couch so, it would be rougher for me to get one done. But It sounds like a really good idea. We are hard core hand quilters. I also love hand quilting and how it looks. No machine can match that as far as I am concerned. They are good in their own way, but as far as heirlooms go, how can you beat handwork? :)

  4. #54
    Senior Member rhueluna's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by kaygerou
    Kryssa,
    I find that I love hand stitching better than machine stritching. I find it very relaxing. And I love to sitd. If my stitches aren't exact, it's ok and also gives me alot of practice for when I do hand stitching where it is noticeable.
    My hand stitching isn't perfect. But I like the hand made look to them. Perfection isn't what I am looking for. Its not important to me that it be exact. Seeing each stitch that was done by hand in its own way, makes me feel great. I love some of the old ones that show very little experience. But look how we inspect them and see the loving work that went into them.

  5. #55
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    Oh dear one, I'm going nuts trying to stitch in the ditch! I feel your frustration! I have a lovely, bright quilt top. Saw some pretty lime Minky (sp?) My trusted quilt shop person said I didn't need batting, just use Minky, stitch in the ditch to attach Minky to top. Sweet mother, I'm having a terrible time stitching straight. I use a walking foot, too. The lint/fuzz is for the birds! I'll bring it back to my quilt person for assistance. Stitch in the ditch isn't as easy as I thought.

  6. #56
    Power Poster Mousie's Avatar
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    I have a couple books that show you how to quilt in sections.
    You make a section of the quilt and quilt it...then make another section and quilt that...by the time you have the top done, you have almost finished the whole thing.
    I have fibromyalgia and wrestling a whole quilt all at once, for me is unthinkable!

    Divide and Conquer

    Marti Michell's Quilting In Sections

  7. #57
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    Sorry to hear this. Try to quilt until it seems like a burden then stop do something else and then start again. Just don't give up.

  8. #58
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    Sorry to hear this. Try to quilt until it seems like a burden then stop do something else and then start again. Just don't give up.

  9. #59
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    Sorry to hear this. Try to quilt until it seems like a burden then stop do something else and then start again. Just don't give up.

  10. #60
    Member distar2's Avatar
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    have you ever thought of just tying the larger quilts? most of my queen size quilts i have always tied. i don't want to spend the extra money or depersonalize my quilt by having someone else machine quilt it when i give it as a gift. my boyfriend has told me he likes the look of tied quilts and it makes him remember his childhood so it's a heartwarming memory for him to see and use a handmade quilt that has been tied with yarn.

  11. #61
    Senior Member rhueluna's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by distar2
    have you ever thought of just tying the larger quilts? most of my queen size quilts i have always tied. i don't want to spend the extra money or depersonalize my quilt by having someone else machine quilt it when i give it as a gift. my boyfriend has told me he likes the look of tied quilts and it makes him remember his childhood so it's a heartwarming memory for him to see and use a handmade quilt that has been tied with yarn.
    I too would rather see you tie it than send it off to a big machine with a computerized pattern after all the work you did making the top. Usually people don't agree with me. :)

  12. #62
    Senior Member wendsy's Avatar
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    I have found that if I make the middle complete (I usually am making a twin sized quilt) top, batting, and backing-I can quilt the smaller area easier than the completed quilt. I finish the quilt by adding borders and a binding. Making it in workable pieces makes it easier for me.

  13. #63
    Super Member Kitsie's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by quilt queen 2
    I bought an old dining room table DH cut a hole and made a shelf so my machine is flush with the top and I wear garden gloves l also use a slider This evolved after I had struggled with 4 queen quilts for X-mas gifts.That was 4 years ago now I don't dread quilting my own quilts!
    I do the same thing with the garden gloves and my granddad's old kitchen table. I've done 2 kings and a queen on a 35 yr old machine with no walking foot! Can you do a block at a time? At least you feel progress with each one! Keep going, girl!

  14. #64
    Super Member joeyoz's Avatar
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    I usually just concentrate on one block or border at a time. Makes it less intimidating.

  15. #65
    Super Member Quilter2B's Avatar
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    I have done queen size on my DM and use a chair behind my machine and to the side to help hold the weight. It is also helpful if you can put your ironing board adjusted to the height of your sewing table

  16. #66
    Super Member Ditter43's Avatar
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    I personally think SITD is one of the harder ways to quilt!!
    I like the idea I've seen several here use...quilting with a wavey stitch pattern that is on many machines. I prefer FMQ even on large quilts. I am working on a quilt as you go right now. So far it is easy, but I haven't started sewing the blocks together yet...... :wink:

  17. #67
    Senior Member rhueluna's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ditter43
    I personally think SITD is one of the harder ways to quilt!!
    I like the idea I've seen several here use...quilting with a wavey stitch pattern that is on many machines. I prefer FMQ even on large quilts. I am working on a quilt as you go right now. So far it is easy, but I haven't started sewing the blocks together yet...... :wink:
    I have done several that way and as long as you don't mind that you can see where they are attached on the back its good. I just did these 3 rows and attached them so far. I am now working on the last 2 rows which I have as a section. I do 2 rows most of the time. This is how it looks after attaching the rows.
    Attached Images Attached Images


  18. #68
    Super Member lizzy's Avatar
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    My DH did the same thing for me using a large wooden office desk we bought for $25.00 at a garage sale. It made all the difference to have my machine flush with the desk top.

  19. #69
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    That's why I hand quilt. No way can even think about hiring the quilting done and I don't have the physical strength, energy or stamina to machine quilt and I make either twin or queen sized quilts. I do quilt as you go and work in panels. When the first panel is ready to hand quilt, while quilting it, I'm busy piecing the next panel. By the time it's pieced and ready to quilt, the first panel is quilted so attach the 2 panels and begin quilting it and at the same time I'm piecing the last panel. When all 3 panels are completed (twin or queen) I lay it out and decide on the borders and begin building out my borders one side at a time and quilting as I go. Yes that does mean my quilts do have seams on the botton but when you look at the quilt from the top, you can't tell that I quilt as you go by panels - see my avatar. It was done this way. I'm always busy quilting. Yes I can't turn out a quilt in a week the my machine quilting friends do but my family and I love the quilts I do turn out and each family member is thrilled to get one because I haven't inundated them with too many quilts. Each one is loved and appreciated. I machine piece and hand quilt and do NOT use a hoop or frame which makes my quilt very portable. Each week a quilt goes with me to a quilting chapter and another Happy Stitchers group that I'm a member of. Give it some thought. I could be an answer for you.

    If you can't hand quilt or prefer to machine quilt, there are ways to work in panels while machine quilting. Quilt as you go - do a search on this board for quilt as you go.

    Also check out Marti Michell's Machine Quilting in Sections. It's actually a modification of her technique that I use in my hand quilting. My panels are machine quilted together. Where there is a will and determination, there is a way. Go for it.

    Forgot to add, there is no reason you can't stitch in the ditch and machine stitch your sashing and straight areas and then hand quilt in detail in the squares. I did that on a sampler quilt this winter for our block of the month quilt we each made this past year in our quilt chapter and it came out beautiful. I won't hesitate to that again. If there is something I want to add and don't want to tackle on the sewing machine I'll do it by hand but it did save a lot of time by machine sewing the sashing. It was a sampler with a lot of sashing and it was a whole lot easier doing them on the machine.
    Patty

    Quote Originally Posted by Kryssa
    I own a Janome Magnolia 7330 and I am about to kill everyone in the house at the thought of sitting down to finish quilting a twin XL quilt.

    I'm guessing most of you send your bed quilts to a long arm quilter? But I can't afford that.

    Maybe it wouldn't be as bad if I was just quilting straight lines, but I decided to SITD around some of the shapes.

    I am about half way done. Maybe I will get another quarter done tonight if I can stand to sit down and start. If I could finish the quilting this weekend I would be so happy.

    And I will probably never stray from lap-size and baby quilts again!

  20. #70
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    I find that STID is the hardest kind of machine quilting to do. If you're off even just a little it really shows. But just do a little at a time and before you know it, it will be done.

  21. #71

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    To Needlenut,

    Thanks for your helpful hints. I have often thought about, but haven't tried yet, the technique of using a backing fabric with an "all over" print whose subject somehow relates to the front fabric and then stitching an outline around the figures on the backing. This would involve quilting in reverse, in that you are doing the stitching on the backing and it shows up on the front of the quilt. This sound doable to me since I have not mastered stipple quilting. What do you think?
    NannyQ

  22. #72

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    To quiltlin,

    I have learned that doing SITD using a small zig-zag rather than straight stitch allows for a little more flexibility, plus it makes the quilt stitches stronger especially for bed quilts. Try it sometime!
    NannyQ

  23. #73

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    To rhueluna,

    I agree with you completely. What is the point of piecing a quilt yourself, only to have someone else machine quilt? When I see
    quilts in the shows that are pieced by so and so and quilted on someone else's longarm, it seems to take away something from the value. OK OK I know I am somewhat of a CF but there are probably others out there like us

    NannyQ :hunf:

  24. #74
    Senior Member rhueluna's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by NannyQ
    To rhueluna,

    I agree with you completely. What is the point of piecing a quilt yourself, only to have someone else machine quilt? When I see
    quilts in the shows that are pieced by so and so and quilted on someone else's longarm, it seems to take away something from the value. OK OK I know I am somewhat of a CF but there are probably others out there like us

    NannyQ :hunf:
    Yes, I guess getting them out there quickly is more important than workmanship. I know several people that do that and seem happy with it. Just not me. :)

  25. #75
    Power Poster Jingle's Avatar
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    I quilt all my quilts and seldom do many smaller than a double size. I do FMQ quilting and I love it and the look.
    SID does not look good to me if the lines are out of the ditch. If I don't FMQ, I stitch about a 1/4" away from the ditch, I prefer this look.

    I would never pay to have quilts quilted, I figure I spend enough money only to give most away.

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