Welcome to the Quilting Board!

Already a member? Login above
loginabove
OR
To post questions, help other quilters and reduce advertising (like the one on your left), join our quilting community. It's free!

Page 1 of 3 1 2 ... LastLast
Results 1 to 25 of 51

Thread: I Sure Need Some Advise

  1. #1
    Super Member wendiq's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2009
    Location
    No. California
    Posts
    2,980

    I Sure Need Some Advise

    I have just finished a flannel rag quilt and need to wash it......gonna be lots of shedding. Do you think I can use a landromat washer and dryer? I am totally afraid to use my own as I am sure it will clog the drain. I am convinced I will never do this again. I already feel guilty....any advise or experiences will be greatly appreciated.....

  2. #2
    Super Member Deborahlees's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Location
    Wine Country-Southern California
    Posts
    1,455
    ok...............no worries, it is NOT THAT BAD......
    I have always used my own with no problems at all.....
    I am assuming you rag cut all your edges.....
    So first what I do is take it out side on the lawn and shake the he... out of it, that gets rid of some of
    the threads, next wash cold, gentle in your machine....that loosens up the rest.....now into the dryer
    thats where you are going to get the most, I went back to my machine about every 10 minutes, stopped it
    and removed the lint filter, and cleaned, started again, went back again....that way you have nothing to be worried
    about, pending on the size of your quilt, you MAY, want to wash and dry again......but not really necessary....
    These are great quilts for young children, if you give as gifts, just tell the parents to wash and dry expecting some lint for the first couple times.....then it does stop !!!
    Yes that is a real picture of my hometown Temecula, California. We feature premiere Wineries, World Class Golf Courses, Pechanga Indian Casino and Hot Air Balloons

  3. #3
    Super Member quilt addict's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Location
    Southern California
    Posts
    2,675
    I prefer to go to the laundry matt to wash mine the first time. But I have also done it at home. Follow Deborahlees' advice about cleaning out the lint trap in your dryer.
    Lisa

  4. #4
    Super Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Location
    Tn
    Posts
    2,492
    Yes, I prefer to use the laundromat the first time. I do warn the attendants they will need to clean the dryer lint traps. After that I wash at home but still watch the lint trap as there will always be fuzz.

  5. #5
    Power Poster Jingle's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Location
    Outside St. Louis
    Posts
    28,579
    I have thought of the fluff too. One day I may make one, I seem to pick out something else.
    Another Phyllis
    This life is the only one you get - enjoy it before you lose it.

  6. #6
    Super Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2012
    Location
    The Colony, TX
    Posts
    3,364
    I have always (after the first time) taken mine to the laundromat. The first time I did it at home and had just gotten a new washer - I didn't realize that a lot of the new ones didn't have lint catchers. Needless to say the repair man was wondering what in the heck I was doing when he came out with a large handful of strings. I was like "just washing" don't know what happened

  7. #7
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2012
    Location
    kannapolis, nc
    Posts
    391
    Baby and lap quilts I do at home but anything bigger goes to the laundry mat.

  8. #8
    Super Member wendiq's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2009
    Location
    No. California
    Posts
    2,980
    So many suggestions.....Thank You. These are both lap sized.....was suppose to be one, but I have decided that it would be way too large so divided it up into a large and a small lap quilt. I have already run them through the dryer on air just to loosen the excess threads. I may try to wash the smaller one and then dry as Deborahlees suggested. I'm really nervous about this......You guys to the rescue are great!!!

  9. #9
    Senior Member Toni C's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Location
    Crosby,Texas
    Posts
    838
    Oh yes always go to laundry mat. Most people don't realize how much these lint they throw off during washing. My drain pump went out-I never realized it had a lint trap. Though it's hard to get to and quite a bit of water hits the floor when I found out and checked it was almost completely plugged with lint.I now have left off the bottom panel so I can get to it and clean.Commercial washers have a filter easy to clean. Also never thought about the lint in the septic system until brought up on this board.

  10. #10
    Senior Member humbird's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Posts
    963
    Quote Originally Posted by Deborahlees View Post
    ok...............no worries, it is NOT THAT BAD......
    I have always used my own with no problems at all.....
    I am assuming you rag cut all your edges.....
    So first what I do is take it out side on the lawn and shake the he... out of it, that gets rid of some of
    the threads, next wash cold, gentle in your machine....that loosens up the rest.....now into the dryer
    thats where you are going to get the most, I went back to my machine about every 10 minutes, stopped it
    and removed the lint filter, and cleaned, started again, went back again....that way you have nothing to be worried
    about, pending on the size of your quilt, you MAY, want to wash and dry again......but not really necessary....
    These are great quilts for young children, if you give as gifts, just tell the parents to wash and dry expecting some lint for the first couple times.....then it does stop !!!
    Good advise here, however, when I have done those linty things, I take it out side and shake again after running thru the washer, and before going into the dryer. (while it is still wet) It does help some.

  11. #11
    Super Member Lori S's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2010
    Location
    Illinois
    Posts
    9,385
    If you have a washer that "dumps" into a wash tub prior to the sewer line , its easy to catch the lint/threads , just put a nylon stocking over the end of the line ( secure with rubber bands) to catch the stuff that is shed in the washing process. If not I would say go to the laundry mat.

  12. #12
    Super Member barri1's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2010
    Location
    Woodmere, NY
    Posts
    1,420
    I did it at the laundromat, and it wasn't a problem with the washer, but I kept checking the lint trap in the dryer every 15 minutes, and it was packed each time

  13. #13
    Super Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Posts
    1,513
    I've done up to a twin size in my home washer. I clean out the trap in the washing machine afterward and check the lint filter several times as it drying. so far no problems.

  14. #14
    Senior Member Kat Sews's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Posts
    646
    This is a different way to keep the lint out of the plumbing. I saw a video of a man who made a rag quilt and took it outside, taped it down to a board, then used an electric weed whacker to fray the seams. He said not to use a gas weed whacker because they are more powerful and would damage the quilt. After he finished with the whacker he picked it up and shook it well. It looked like it did a good job. I wish I could remember who it was.

  15. #15
    Super Member Dina's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Location
    Texas
    Posts
    5,060
    I have this mental picture of me whackingat a quilt with a weed whacker. Funny!

    Dina

  16. #16
    Super Member Peckish's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Location
    Pacific NW
    Posts
    6,163
    Blog Entries
    1
    It was John Flynn.

  17. #17
    Super Member blahel's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Location
    other side of the black stump, Perth Western Australia
    Posts
    1,890
    Blog Entries
    16
    When I made my rag quilt I took it outside gave it a big shake and then hung in on the washing line. i got a nail brush and just brushed the raggedy edges in all directions and that got rid of a lot of it. I repeated the process several times and then washed it and gave it one last final brush and shake.
    True friends are like diamonds
    They are precious and rare.

  18. #18
    Super Member auntpiggylpn's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Location
    Michigan. . .FINALLY!!!!
    Posts
    6,916
    Blog Entries
    1
    I have used the suction hose of my vacuumn on mine before I wash it the first time. Then I shake it outside after it is washed and before it goes into the dryer. I check my dryer lint trap about every 10 mins and remove all the threads. Mine still sheds pretty bad after about 10 washings!
    No one has ever become poor by giving. - Anne Frank
    Darkness cannot drive out darkness; only light can do that. Hate cannot drive out hate; only love can do that. - Martin Luther King, Jr.

    http://www.etsy.com/shop/TheQuiltedPig

  19. #19
    Super Member wendiq's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2009
    Location
    No. California
    Posts
    2,980
    Well Ladies, I washed and dried the smaller lap sized quilt......44x56......I washed it on a delicate cycle. I have a front loading machine and it looks like there is a lot of string stuff around the cylinder but I can't get to it. I frequently emptied the dryer lint trap and it is done. I will NEVER do one of these again. The larger one.....48x62 is going to the laundromat! Even after I removed the dried quilt, it still had to be brushed to get all the strings off of it. I think that instead of sending this to my son in Florida, that they are going to end up at the homeless shelter in the mountains. They will be very warm and I think appreciated more than in Florida. They are both made of a mountain designed flannel.....I lined each block with flannel.....very warm and rather heavy to be mailing. It has been a learning experience. Thank you, all, for your input. If my washer wasn't 10 years old, I might be more adventurous, but at this point in time, I'm going to be cautious and use the laundromat on this last one.....

  20. #20
    Super Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    Location
    S. Texas
    Posts
    1,948
    Use the laundermat!!! I clogged the drain in my washer and had to have it serviced. Luckily it was under warranty and didn't have to pay.

  21. #21
    Super Member piepatch's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2010
    Posts
    2,929
    I have made about 14 to 15 rag quilts, and have taken all but one of them to the laundromat for the first washing because I was told the washers and dryers there have bigger lint traps, and that made sense to me. I did wash one at home, and didn't have a problem with it. I cleaned the lint filter on the dryer about every ten minutes, and there was a lot of lint each time!

  22. #22
    Super Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2012
    Location
    Beautiful BC
    Posts
    1,214
    Blog Entries
    1
    I know OP has already done one quilt at home and will do the next one at the laundry mat. But I thought I would share how I wash rag quilts at home.

    I have a top loading washer and have made 5 small and 3 twin sized rag quilts. I wash at home, but my machine has a presoak cycle that does not drain. I use the heavy duty cycle and once it has agitated I use a colander and strain the water until I am only getting a few small bit of thread. Then I reset the machine to the beginning of the soak cycle and repeat several times. When it gets to the point I am not getting as much thread, I let the machine complete the wash cycle.

    Then it is into the dryer. I find that by doing the long agitation, and straining the threads out of the washer, I do not get as much in the dryer lint filter.

    I have used two layers of flannel, a layer of flannel and a layer of denim and two layers of flannel with a layer of thin batting.

    I would not attempt a quilt larger than twin sized in my home machine.
    Attending University. I will graduate a year after my son and year before my daughter.

  23. #23
    Super Member mjsylvstr's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    Spring Lake, NJ
    Posts
    2,444
    I have made the chenille quilts and they also give out a lot of lint but have had no trouble doing them at home...just have to be watching the traps for an overload of the "fluff" and cleaning them out often

  24. #24
    Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2012
    Location
    Texas
    Posts
    14
    You can put it in a pillow case, closed with safety pins. Then wash and dry. No lint in machine and you can then take it outside to shake it out. I repair old quilts and use that method. It keeps them in one piece as some are really delicate.

  25. #25
    Super Member Amythyst02's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Location
    Phoenix, AZ.
    Posts
    1,355
    I just throw mine in my washer and dry it, but checking the filter quite often. And I usually wash a couple of times too. I have had no problems.
    Amythyst

Page 1 of 3 1 2 ... LastLast

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

SEO by vBSEO ©2011, Crawlability, Inc.