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Thread: Is it just me or does anyone else get aggrevated....

  1. #76
    Super Member Annya's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Farm Quilter
    Quote Originally Posted by Linda B
    Bearisgray: Losing so much to fraying in the wash is exactly why I hand wash all my fabric in the kitchen sink now. There will still be some stringies, by NOTHING like the wad you get from a washing machine. What I wish I had was an old fashioned wringer!!
    Oh, what a great idea! I have 2 of them in my basement!!! Now to just convince my DH that I need to have one of them hooked up to water for washing fabrics :-D :thumbup:
    I always wash mine in buckets for different colors, starting with the one less likely to bleed up to the ones that bleed a lot. I some times have up to 1/2 dozen containers with hot soapy water. in them/ then I rinse the lot in warm water in the same order, that way I can't lose too much threads. Salt and vinegar is added if i have to wash the fabric a second time to set the dye. It does work for me anyway.

  2. #77
    Super Member Eddie's Avatar
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    The Wal-Mart that I buy fabric from always adds a few extra inches to every cut. Often, if there's less than a yard left on the bolt they just throw it in free. However, one LQS I go to they generally ALL cut it 1/2" or so over the requested size, so it's obvious that they've all been trained to do that. At another LQS, they ALL cut it EXACTLY at the requested size, no overage. So frequently, I get shorted a bit there.

  3. #78
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    Quote Originally Posted by Farm Quilter
    Quote Originally Posted by Linda B
    Bearisgray: Losing so much to fraying in the wash is exactly why I hand wash all my fabric in the kitchen sink now. There will still be some stringies, by NOTHING like the wad you get from a washing machine. What I wish I had was an old fashioned wringer!!
    Oh, what a great idea! I have 2 of them in my basement!!! Now to just convince my DH that I need to have one of them hooked up to water for washing fabrics :-D :thumbup:
    I remember my grandmother and grandfather had one of these. They were the only people I knew who didn't have a modern washing maching, and I was fascinated by it. I can remember watching my grandfather running things through the wringer, and how perfectly squished and flat they came out on the other side. I could have watched him for hours.

  4. #79
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    I usually help the girls get fabric laid out straight. I haven't shown them to cut on the pattern line, but maybe I will. I got about 1/3 a yard of fabric the other day to make doll clothes from. It was cut so bad the cut before mine that I lost about 3 inches on one side!

    I remember when they would give you an extra inch or so just to make sure they didn't short you!

  5. #80

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    I work behind the cutting counter and I try my best to please all of you. However, we are not mind readers and if you think you might need those extra 2 inches then request them. We have very strict guidelines to follow and cannot just cut 2" here or three" there. Also, I can only cut in certain increments of a yard, so if you need 21" then I have to cut 5/8yd (23.5). I could go on about pet peeves with some customers but I won't.

  6. #81
    Super Member Pzazz's Avatar
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    My brand new LQS is great. They use a ruler and rotary cutter and make sure you get the whole amount, and wee snick more.

    If I am in my local Joanns, I love it when the one male employee is working. And I don't mind if I have to wait a bit in his line as he takes his time to make sure he is being very accurate, and he leaves that wonky bit on the end of the cut. After all, if the end showing is wonky, you KNOW the whole bolt is likely wonky, so with that extra bit left on, you usually can get what you need from your piece.

    Patti

  7. #82
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    Hi All, as a fabricolic,,,, When you tear the fabric, it tears evenly with the weave (grain) of the fabric. The reason most of the fabric goes willy wonky, is because they cut the fabric wrong and the fabric is printed cock-eyed. The big headache is when it is torn, and not cut, it is stretched out at the edge. I would still rather have the fabric cut or torn on the lay of the fabric because when it gets washed, it goes back to the original woven pattern. Printed correctly or not. This makes the pattern willy wonky. This is the reason for alot of big fabric saes.

  8. #83
    Super Member MaggieLou's Avatar
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    I guess I just got lucky today but I went to Ben Franklin's for some fabric. Two of the pieces were almost the end of the bolts. I requested a 1 yd. piece and a 2 yd. one. The 1 yd. piece had about 1/4 yd. left and the 2 yd. piece had almost 1/2 yd. left. I got both pieces for the yardage I requested with no extra charge. I'm tickled pink. :)

  9. #84
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    Quote Originally Posted by Linda B
    Bearisgray: Losing so much to fraying in the wash is exactly why I hand wash all my fabric in the kitchen sink now. There will still be some stringies, by NOTHING like the wad you get from a washing machine. What I wish I had was an old fashioned wringer!!
    When you hand wash (or hand rinse) your fabrics in the sink, you can transfer them to the dryer in a basin or on a towel and spin out the excess water.

  10. #85
    Super Member Annya's Avatar
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    I do not have a dryer only the sun. They do not take long to dry and I fold them as I take them off the line until I can iron them to be put away.

  11. #86
    Super Member sylvia77's Avatar
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    It bothers me to no end. I want every inch I paid for!

  12. #87
    Super Member purplefiend's Avatar
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    I either zig zag or serge the raw edges of my fabrics. Then wash in All Free(on delicate) and then dry on low heat, fold as soon as its done.

  13. #88
    Super Member chamby's Avatar
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    This is why I always stand at the cutting table while fabric is being cut. If I notice that the beginning end is wonky I will ask the sales person to straighten that line before cutting. I just bought ribbon the other day off a new spool. It had the glue on the end. I ask if she would measure past the glue since I would not be able to use that piece. She was glad to do this for me. Just pay close attention when fabric is being cut. I do not mind letting them know that if it is wonky I will be paying for fabric that I can not use. If this is done in a nice way they do not mind working with you.

  14. #89
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    At Mary Jo's In Gastonia N.C. they always rip the fabric like they use to years back. They do cut their panels or speciality fabrics with scissors and they are very careful with the pattern. Love that place !!!!! :lol:

  15. #90
    Dee
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    When my fabric is being cut, I stand and watch and help straighten the fabric out.

  16. #91
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    I get very aggravated by this. I recently did a baby quilt and could not even get a 5" piece that was straight with the pattern. This is a slightly different problem that the wonky cuts. Those are bad enough, but the twisted pattern/ fabric grain is even worse. I come from a background of sewing garments and like cuts on the straight grain of the fabric. Problem is with a lot of fabric, even the expensive bolts is that the pattern is so crooked you cannot square up and end without losing a lot of fabric.

  17. #92

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    Ever notice the change of personel in that dept. One of my students brought the worst cut from Joanns that I have ever seen. It was hacked with a corner literally missing on both ends. It was a pain to try to find enough fabric on the straight of the goods to get the fabric we need for half squares. Fabric is too expensive to ruin it by not cutting it properly. I wonder if the girl had ever seen a rotary cutter before.

  18. #93

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    It also helps to clip the corners on each piece so you don't have a rats nest when its washed and dried. The clipping acts like pinking shears. You can also purchase a pinking blade for your rotary cutter. Its worth the time. I also wet one piece at a time in my sink rather then use my washer. It takes out the sizing and after you do that toss it in the dryer. Its a good time to test to see if over dyed things bleed as well. When you buy the cheap fabric from JoAnns and Walmart you will notice that it goes limp as a rag. This is what the Textile companies use to print a first run of the fabric. After that they go to the threads with more thread count. It makes a hugh difference in the life of your quilting and the usage. You can't see thru the good stuff and its running $10.00 a yard in most shops. So you get what you pay for. If I am going to spends hours and dollars making a quilt I expect $100.00 to $200.00 for fabrics and battening or more as I don't do Queen and King. The better shops do not hire people with little or no experience on the cutting tables.

  19. #94
    Senior Member Mimito2's Avatar
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    I was at Joanns when they were having half off their clearance fabric. I had a pc that was marked $1 a yard. It came up at 1 yard and 32 inches and cutter says ok that pc is 2 yards and I said no it wasn't. She ignores me and proceeds to 'look' for the UPC code and could not find one so she walks back to a pc that is $3 a yard and scans it at the 2 yards for a total half price of $3, total was supposed to be less than $1. I objected and she says its ok and that it will "ring up" correctly. I had several other pcs that I wanted and they were measured/priced correctly. I get to the cash register and guess what? it rings up $3. I tell the cashier that I need to talk to customer service. I explain the situation and am told that I have to go back to the twit that messed it up in the first place (the only 1 cutting with a long line) to get it fixed, that CS can't help me !!!!! Every one was watching by this time and I was very aggravated (and hungry) so I said very loudly. "OH NO I DON'T" and threw the whole bunch on the CS table and walked out. It took me 4 months to get over being angry before I could go back. Store has been remodeled to a lot less material and that cutter no longer works there. Still I will just buy here, online or at local goodwill. No hassle, no waiting and great customer service.

  20. #95
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    We seem to have a great turnover here at the JoAnn's in town. But you know what is funny? The guys that work there and cut fabric seem to be more careful than some of the girls. I don't know why that is, but you can tell by watching them, they go slower and are very careful. So far, I don't have a problem with JoAnn's-just hate the long lines at the check-out, but even that has it's up-side-you can talk to all the quilters while we all wait!!

  21. #96
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    ************
    this topic is more or less a rant. it won't solve anything and just gets us all stirred up.

    legitimate consumer information and alerts are useful if they are presented calmly, logically and are accompanied by substantiated facts and other evidence.

    however Rants, raves, vents and flames are strongly discouraged. They serve no constructive purpose; they start arguments; and they make us look bad as a group. We end up sounding like a bunch of cranky, selfish, silly old bats. (now, you know we aren't really; and I know we aren't really. but the rest of the world may not read through enough of the board to figure that out.)

    all these pages boil down to one valid point: pay attention while your fabric is being cut.

    help the store employees provide you quality service by calmly pointing out the mistake and firmly but politely refusing to accept substandard cuts.[/i] get store management involved if necessary.

    if all else fails, walk away from the purchase altogether.

    send a calm, factual letter with all the details to the highest level of management possible.

    **********

    to learn more about your rights and responsibilities as a consumer, start here:
    http://www.ftc.gov/consumer

    and here:
    http://www.consumeraction.gov/state.shtml
    *************

  22. #97
    Moderator tlrnhi's Avatar
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    I'm with Patrice on this. You have to bring it to the attention of the employees that there's something wrong with the fabric/cutting. Nothing is going to happen unless you say something to them. If then they don't do anything, go a step higher. Then if nothing happens and you can't go any higher, then I wouldn't shop there.
    Sitting idly by and just accepting what you are given is not acceptable.

  23. #98
    Power Poster sharon b's Avatar
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    Yep, I agree with Patrice also :lol:

    How many of you that got "bad" cuts have suggested to the clerk a better way to cut ? Nicely of course :wink: I have seen cutters that are so nervous, you know they are very new to it , so I try to talk to them to help them relax.

    Also remember that if you get shorted once, another time you might get that "lil bit extra" When that happens do you tell the clerk, oh no that is not correct ?

    Remember in the grand scheme of life , this is just a minor annoyance :lol: I know some will say... WELL you are getting shorted , maybe . Sometimes yes, sometimes no . We all are human, no one is perfect , and until I am perfect I don't expect it from anyone else 8-)

  24. #99
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    sharon b - has a valid point - how many times do we point out when we get "extra" - I know - overall - that I'm WAAAAY ahead of the game!

    as far as that goes, where else do we EXPECT to get extra?

    we buy a dozen eggs, we get 12

    we buy four ounces of shampoo, we expect to only get four ounces, etc.

  25. #100
    Moderator Jim's Gem's Avatar
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    I agree with Patrice and Sharon on this as well!!!!

    Watch what is happening, if there is a problem, point it out, respectfully, if that doesn't work go to a manager and treating them with respect, let them know what happened.

    We all need to treat people with more respect. Kill them with Kindness, even when we have been wronged!

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