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Thread: LA owners don't say much about loading a quilt on the frame.

  1. #26
    j
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    Chrismah could you move to AZ, I would like you for a neighbor, the house next door is empty. -- J.

  2. #27

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    Maybe the reason it took so long was because she was teaching you how to do it. There is talking time and demo time. If she was doing it all by herself it would probaly be a much shorter time.

  3. #28
    Super Member Lori S's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by j
    Chrismah could you move to AZ, I would like you for a neighbor, the house next door is empty. -- J.
    Oh.. no I 've got an empty one here by me!! I'll even offer some cooking.

  4. #29
    Super Member #1piecemaker's Avatar
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    I was wondering how long it takes to load one. I guess if it took 2 hours, it would be worth it in the long run; considering it takes me several weeks to quilt one by hand.

  5. #30
    Super Member azdesertrat's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by j
    Chrismah could you move to AZ, I would like you for a neighbor, the house next door is empty. -- J.
    i agree with that!

  6. #31
    Super Member luvstoquilt301's Avatar
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    That is really a loooooooooooong time. I got much faster with practice and now it usually takes on quilt podcast and I hardly notice the time going by. This is on my Ipod.

    It is the beginning I had to long at the dvd several times in the process.

  7. #32

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    I have to say it only takes me maybe 5-15 minutes to get it loaded and basted on (I use my LA to baste the pieces onto my velcro leaders), ready to begin quilting. No problemo...

    2 hours is enough to make me give up longarming! LOL! I don't have that much patience :)

    Debbie in Austin

  8. #33
    Super Member amandasgramma's Avatar
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    Takes me 1/2 hour to pin a queen size quilt on. I use large coursage pins. My wish list has "red snappers". Here's a video: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VdESb8_p5ec

  9. #34
    Senior Member alissa's Avatar
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    It takes me about 30 mins or so to pin on the quilt depends on the size of the quilt. In 2 hours I can have a full or queen size quilt finished. at first it took a little longer but once you get the hang of things it goes a faster...

  10. #35
    Senior Member vickimc's Avatar
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    takes me about 45 to load my longarm. and I am a little slow. I have been doing this sence 2003. the more you do the better you get. I would rather get it right that have to undue it. which I have.

  11. #36
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    It doesn't take me nearly that long to load a quilt on my LA. I watch TV while I load it and the time goes by quickly, maybe 30 min. I also float my batting and top which saves time. I LOVE my LA. It is more fun than should be allowed by law!!!

  12. #37
    Power Poster dunster's Avatar
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    Two hours does sound like a lot of time. Are you sure some of that wasn't because she was using the time to teach you, or because there were problems with the quilt top that needed correction? I find that I can load a quilt on the longarm in much less time than it takes to pin-baste the quilt for quilting on the DSM.

  13. #38
    Senior Member catlover's Avatar
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    Preparation time depends on the quilt. Larger quilts take longer. If the client hasn't squared the backing, it takes longer to do that first. The outcome of the quilting is so dependent on how well the quilt is loaded onto the frame, that it is worth whatever time it takes to get it on perfectly.

    Cynthia

  14. #39
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    I think maybe this lady was going slow so that you would see and understand the process.

  15. #40
    Senior Member carolstickelmaier's Avatar
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    I agree with BellBoo. With my back injuries I cannot stand and bend over long enough to pin the quilt on. If I manage to get it on in one day then then I spend the next two or three days bent over and using heating pads. Not much fun I do enjoy machine quilting on regular machine and have just ordered the sit down HQ16 Looking forward to using it.

  16. #41
    Super Member Rosyhf's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by MaryStoaks
    It takes me less, 20 to 30 minutes. I float the top and batting, just lay them on the backing after the backing is loaded and rolled on the frame poles/leaders. I use a few pins to keep the top and batting straight on the backing, then sew around the edges to attach it. I do have to take a minute to straighten the top and batting with each advance of the quilt. :thumbup: :thumbup:

    Ditto, me too....

  17. #42
    Super Member DeeBooper's Avatar
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    It takes me a couple hours to load if it is a big one but I am new so hoping I can get it a little faster eventually. It makes me really excited though to get to the quilting part. I absolutely hate pinning layers!!!!!!That was the only part of the quilting I hated.

  18. #43
    Senior Member hulahoop1's Avatar
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    It takes me longer to get up the nerve to take that first stitch than it does to load the quilt on the frame. But it's getting better. Usually an hour to load and the next day to start sewing....

  19. #44
    Super Member Olivia's Grammy's Avatar
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    It takes me about 45 to 60 minutes to load a king. I have velcro leaders, but I have never taken them off to baste to the quilt. I tried floating the top one time and did not like the results. I do float the batting. Even with the loading time I can do an all over design in 4 - 6 hours depending on the size.

  20. #45
    Super Member quiltingfan's Avatar
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    When we move to Virginia there are a couple of LAQ stores in the town where we will be living, I noticed one of them will rent time on there long arm. I am excited to try that out and be able to learn how to load the quilt. I think that would be the most intimidating part of the whole process. Or at least for me it is. I love to go to quilt shows and "play" on all the machines. They look at you funny if you take more than a couple of minutes wasting there thread.

  21. #46
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    I have a Handiquilter (HQ 16) and it takes me about 45 minutes...at most, an hour.

  22. #47
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    How do you float the batting, etc?......I'm still learning.

  23. #48
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    I have helped a couple friends do top and it never took use that long to load a quilt.

  24. #49

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    To float the batting, all you do is anchor it down to the backing (I do this with my LA - just baste a straight line across the top of the backing and batting). And then simply push it under the 'top' or 'belly' bar, and over the backing bar - letting it hang down. Then of course, your quilt top would go on next. You can float it the same way (save your basting for both until here if doing it this way) and let it hang down (pushing it beneath the belly bar and over the backing bar).

    I almost always float mine - just faster and I have no problems. I figured out the fastest method for me, after trying every single I read/learned about. I learned to baste with the LA so there are no pins on the velcro leaders. I can rip them off and on and change quilts or test pieces in a second, once the quilt is basted to them. Easy peasy :)

    I show the basting on a utube video I made. Search for 'DebbieHQ'. It's in 3-4 very small videos as I didn't know how to combine them (silly me!).
    Debbie in Austin

  25. #50
    Super Member StitchinJoy's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by BellaBoo
    I went to a LA's home for hands on instruction to load and quilt a quilt. It took almost two hours to get the quilt, batting and backing loaded on the machine. The quilter has been doing this for years and does good LA quilting but to go through all that for each quilt?
    I'm glad you got to see the process. It really is interesting.

    When you say, "get the quilt, batting and backing loaded" is that all the steps she did? Did that 2 hours count the time to square up the backing and maybe the top? And also to cut the batting to size?

    And you didn't even mention threading the machine or winding all the bobbins.

    Longarming is different than hand quilting or tabletop quilting but really, even with machines, quilting is a labor intensive craft. If it's going to be done well, it is going to take some time.

    I don't mind taking my time when I load a quilt. It's well worth it to load carefully. It really needs to be done right to have a great result.

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