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Thread: Long Seams Should Be Straight

  1. #1
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    This is a frequent comment made by judges. It relates to the long verticle or hortzontal seam lines when blocks are sewned together. How do you achieve these straight seam lines.

  2. #2
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    You alternate the direction that you sew the seams on the long strips.

  3. #3
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    does this apply as well to long strips of pieced blocks.

  4. #4
    Super Member wvdek's Avatar
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    Yes.

  5. #5
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    Yes, it will stop the long seams from curving.

  6. #6
    Super Member walen's Avatar
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    I agree. It is amazing what reversing the direction of stitching will do to straighten out quilts! Just too cool...

  7. #7
    Super Member Scissor Queen's Avatar
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    I don't sew long seams. I sew my blocks into fours and then the fours into eights. The block seams always match that way and the quilt comes out squarer overall. I only have one long seam in the whole quilt and that's to sew the top and bottom halves together.

  8. #8
    Power Poster amma's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Scissor Queen
    I don't sew long seams. I sew my blocks into fours and then the fours into eights. The block seams always match that way and the quilt comes out squarer overall. I only have one long seam in the whole quilt and that's to sew the top and bottom halves together.
    I will try this next time, thank you :D:D:D

  9. #9
    Power Poster ckcowl's Avatar
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    when all else fails draw your stitching line. sometimes it is easier to follow a drawn straight line; but you still need to alternate directions to keep from getting the curve.
    sometimes no matter how careful i am until i grab a pencil and draw that line i just can not get it right.

  10. #10
    Junior Member gotthebug's Avatar
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    Hey, can someone explain to me what they mean by alternating directions? I'm just not getting it.

  11. #11
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    When you finish sewing a long seam, start again on the end that you just finished sewing. You sew one direction and then turn it around and start at the other end. Hope this helps.

  12. #12
    Senior Member Rachel's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by gotthebug
    Hey, can someone explain to me what they mean by alternating directions? I'm just not getting it.
    I'll see if I can make this clear, it'd be so much easier to show you... If you are looking at the front of the quilt, you would sew one seam right to left, then when you add the next row, so it from left to right. clear as mud?

  13. #13
    Junior Member gotthebug's Avatar
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    I think I got it.... thank you

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