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Thread: machine quilting with decorative stitches

  1. #76

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    kasmitty..
    It looks sooo nice.

  2. #77
    Super Member BrendaB's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by kasmitty1
    It's so funny you asked that. I just did a little playing around with some of my "fancy stitches". I also LOVE multi-colored thread, though it is pricey. But when you use it on contrasting colors, and use the decorative stitch, I think it looks cool.
    Thank you for the visual. I was trying to imagine how it would look. I really like that effect. Will have to try some with my machine.

  3. #78

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    Quote Originally Posted by weezie
    Quote Originally Posted by bstanbro
    I have used a little round star-looking stitch for tieing my quilts.
    Me, too, but they get distorted and I end up with some pretty weird looking stars, which is never the look I'm going for. I used the small round eyelet stitch for tying a small quilt last year and it gave me a lot of distortion grief, also. I adjust the +/- knob that's specifically for that purpose, as per my manual, but to no avail.
    Hmm. I did it with a rag quilt--large 4-patch blocks. I put one in the center of each of the 4-patches. It's a rag quilt. I've been using it for about six months. So far, no problems.

  4. #79
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    Mbunny, I have used my decorative stitches on crazy patchwork and it looked stunning. I did it on top of the seem and I've used in one block different fancy stitches on the different seams and it didn't look "overdone". Sorry that I dont have a picture.

  5. #80
    Super Member sewcrafty's Avatar
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    Here's a question. Someone said to lay the fabric flat when doing decorative stitches. Does this mean to iron open the seam? This does make sense when you think about it.

  6. #81
    Super Member Sheree from Chicago's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by mbunny
    My machine, like most of the modern ones, has a bunch of "fancy" stitches. Usually I'd use them to decorate garments or home decor stuff, but do any of you use them to quilt with? The embroidery looking ones (yeah, we'll pretend that's a word) would be great on a crazy quilt, but I haven't tried them.

    I know, I can experiment, and will, but thought I'd see how your experiments turned out ;)
    A friend of mine on Facebook (Sarah Vedeler) does amazing embroidery on quilts. Of all the art quilters out there, her work amazes me the most.

  7. #82

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    Traditionally decorative stitches are done on crazy quilts. Using a different stitch for each piece. Decorative stitches are not usually used when quilting. Sometimes they are used on childrens quilts to add interest, and maybe just to use the stiches since our newer machines have so many. Same with the varity of threads available. I have used my machine embroidery threads on crazy quilts/childrens quilts.

  8. #83
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    Your sample and workmanship are beautiful. When I got my new machine, I used all the decorative stitches I liked around the edges of a cheater, crazy quilt with batting as my stabilizer and a contrasting color. Not knowing what I was doing, it worked well. When I placed my backing on, I used coordinating thread and stitched again. It turned out beautifully and no one is the wiser about whether or not it is a cheater. Of course, I dusted the machine inside frequently. Have fun with your stitches!

  9. #84
    Super Member clem55's Avatar
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    Loved the way your crazy quilt looked., beautiful. I have to try that! Always thought those stitches should be good for something.LOL

  10. #85

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    I just spent the afternoon making a sampler of all my decorative stitches. It took me quite a while. I made a quilt sandwich out of some scraps I have.

    Some of them end up looking pretty utilitarian when they are stitched out, but some were definitely very pretty. I can imagine using them in a quilt. And the best part is that the look just as good on the bottom.

    I tried out some variegated thread just for fun, and also some metallic thread. I am pretty sure some of them would have looked better in one color. Also, if you're nervous about the bobbin, I've had good results using monofilament thread in the bobbin with regular thread on the top. Then the stitches would be invisible on the bottom.

  11. #86
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    :thumbup: If only I had a machine that did embroidry I would use iy on the prayer quilts I make for my church. But I use a 76 year old Singer Featherweight and love it. Your stitches look wonderful on the shadow quilting. Good job

  12. #87
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    I use decortive stitches on all my quilts. Adds so much extra to each quilt. Plus decortive stiches secures layers of the quilt.

  13. #88
    Super Member fireworkslover's Avatar
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    You have two options: You can use those decorative stitches thru just the pieced top or assemble pieced top with batting and backing and stitch thru them all. You can also use a heavier weight thread and get some amazing designs. Use a 90/14 topstitch needle. Most of all - experiment.
    If stitching thru just your fabric top, you should stabilize it w/ several layers of spray starch and a fusible, medium weight interfacing. The layers of a quilt sandwich are stable enough to handle this type of stitching and don't require stabilizer.

  14. #89
    Moderator littlehud's Avatar
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    I have used my decorative stitches to attach my binding. It can be really pretty.

  15. #90
    Senior Member pam1966's Avatar
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    The way I "lock" the decorative stitches on my machine is to leave a thread tail of the top thread and the bobbin at the beginning and end. Then I pull the top threads through to the back, and with the bobbin threads I "bury" them as if I were hand quilting. My machine doesn't have a locking stitch and a zero stitch length on the decorative stitches wouldn't look good.

  16. #91
    Miss Mona's Avatar
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    I make a lot of quilts for the Childrens Home and use decorative stitches in the varigated thread on all the seams because kids will be kids and the quilts will get lots of use on the bed and on the floor. Sometimes I use more than 1 color and sometimes I use different stitches for each block. I'll make 2-4 quilts using the same blocks but with different stitches and color, all the quilts will be individual and the kids can tell theirs from the other kids; slso sew a patch in the corner so that the director can put the childrens name on it.

  17. #92
    Super Member JoanneS's Avatar
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    Try leaving the needle down, switch to straight stitch, shorten stitch as short as possible and stitch in place. That should lock the stitches.

  18. #93
    Super Member JoanneS's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by kasmitty1
    Quote Originally Posted by Gramof6
    Kasmitty your stitching looks fabulous! Don't you just love Superior thread? Thanks to you, now I will go raid DH's LA thread. LOL

    I do have a stupid question: When using decorative stitching on your machines, how do you lock the stitches in at the end? I have a Bernina but have never used any of these decorative stitches. If I can learn how to lock in the stitches, that will sure change thanks to this topic!
    Not a stupid question. I'd like to know that, too. I back-stitched once, then trimmed close. I know there's a better way. But I was just playing around. I'd love to know the right way.
    Try leaving the needle down, switch to straight stitch, shorten stitch as short as possible and stitch in place. That should lock the stitches.

  19. #94
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    I havent but in the future I plan to. Penny

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