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Thread: Making Quilting Stencils / Marking your quilt

  1. #26
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    Clotilde has one call Ultimate Iron off Pounce.

  2. #27
    Super Member quilt addict's Avatar
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    Thank you for asking the question. Some great information here. I think next time I will try the press and seal.
    Lisa

  3. #28
    Super Member irishrose's Avatar
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    Thank you for asking this. I'm learning a lot.

  4. #29
    Senior Member SUZAG's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Krisb View Post
    Try using Glad wrap. Really. Sounds crazy, but it works. Try looking at this

    http://home.ptd.net/~shoofly/PNS/directions.htm
    Just make sure you use a washable or disappearing marker. I grabbed a permanent marker and marked it out, stitched it and it left a mark on the fabric when I peeled off the wrap...now an applique is going in that spot...LOL

  5. #30
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    do not trust the blue pounce many have reported it does not come out even in washing.
    Also avoid anything chalk like with color in it. Same reason as above.

  6. #31
    Super Member patdesign's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by kristakz View Post
    Does anyone make their own quilting stencils? I hate the idea of buying them - my blocks are seldom standard sizes, and often I'd need to buy a stencil in several sizes in order to do my quilt. So I'm trying to figure out how to mark my own designs on the quilt top. I tried buying some template plastic and cutting that to make a stencil, but it was (I guess) too thick, because cutting an intricate curve was a complete disaster. So, do you have any suggestions for making my own stencils?

    I've also tried sewing over paper templates - and I hate having to pull the paper out later.

    I'm also having a heck of a time finding something to mark with. I bought a pounce pad today, and that's not too bad, but I'm finding it doesn't always leave a legible line. none of the pencils I've tried are working at all. not sure if it's my fabric colour, or something wrong with the pencils, but unless I press REALLY hard, I get nothing. And they all say to mark lightly.

    Any and all suggestions appreciated. I'm getting desperate today.
    I use the disappearing ink pen (red violet in color on one end and blue on the other) Depending on how warm and humid it is the ink will disappear usually in less than 24 hours. I often trace a pattern I like from a library book and then copy it by tracing again onto the plastic pages you purchase and cut it out, then trace around that with the disappearing ink pen, the good news is that you have the pattern to use another day, and you can alter it as you see fit when tracing.
    pat design

  7. #32
    Super Member tjradj's Avatar
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    Here's the link to the Don Linn tutorial on this template from tulle process. It's fantastic. It is the monthly tutorial for the Free Motion Quilting challenge from SewCalGal.blogspot.com. Check it out, esp the video.
    http://www.sewcalgal.blogspot.ca/201...torial-by.html
    Quote Originally Posted by SittingPretty View Post
    I've heard of using tulle fabric in an embroidery hoop. You mark the design on the tulle with a marker. Then you trace the design through the tulle onto your fabric. You could use a permanent marker on the tulle (NOT ON YOUR QUILT!), if you want to save it, but I guess you could use a washout marker, if you want to use the tulle over again with a different design. As for marking your quilt, some people use the Crayola washable markers. I, too, have found that I have to press harder with the other pencils than the "light touch" in the directions. Otherwise, I like marking with chalk, but it does seem to brush off some.
    I used to be "hot", now it's just "hot flashes!"

  8. #33
    Super Member meanmom's Avatar
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    I was shown in a machine quilting class to make my own stencils out of poster board. ( thin cardboard) You just draw out your design on the cardboard. Set your sewing machine to a smallish satin stitch. Put in an old needle and sew on the line with no thread in the machine. ( my machine won't sew with no thread, I use thread) sew for several inches then leave a little space like in a regular stencil. Sew out the whole design to cut it just like a regular stencil. THe sewing machine will cut the cardboard out with a nice thin line for you. It works great.

  9. #34
    Super Member lpsewing's Avatar
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    I am a newbie,I put this in my favorites right!
    Thank you !
    lp

  10. #35
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    I like the idea of the washable plastic. I will try it on the quilt I am doing now because I don't want to sew over paper and then have to tear it away.

  11. #36
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    I should have said water soluble stabilizer instead of washable plastic. I also watch Don Linn tutorial and think I will give that a try. Thanks Tjradj for sharing.

  12. #37
    Super Member Pat625's Avatar
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    Been thinking about this one for a few days since reading the post..I like to reuse things, so using plastic wrap isn't for me. What I am thinking is drawing my design out, them laminating it ( I have a $25 laminator that does 8X11 sheets). Then I can cut the lines out using an exacto knife. If I use the heavy laminate pockets I think this could work..anyone ever try this? Will let you know how it goes

  13. #38
    Junior Member Freddie's Avatar
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    I just watched the video. This is very informative. It opens a whole different aspect of transferring designs. Great!!!

    Quote Originally Posted by tjradj View Post
    Here's the link to the Don Linn tutorial on this template from tulle process. It's fantastic. It is the monthly tutorial for the Free Motion Quilting challenge from SewCalGal.blogspot.com. Check it out, esp the video.
    http://www.sewcalgal.blogspot.ca/201...torial-by.html

  14. #39
    Junior Member Happiness is...'s Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Krisb View Post
    Try using Glad wrap. Really. Sounds crazy, but it works. Try looking at this

    http://home.ptd.net/~shoofly/PNS/directions.htm
    Gotta try this!!!! Sounds really cool.
    Terri

  15. #40
    Super Member liking quilting's Avatar
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    I will try this; thank you sooooo much!!!
    Mavis

  16. #41
    Senior Member kristakz's Avatar
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    I found something similar to overhead transparencies (remember those? From before the days of laptops and projectors). They worked great! Easy to cut with an exacto knife, you can see through them (that's what I didn't like about the cardboard option - can't see to position it correctly). Used a pounce to transfer the design - other than a few spots being hard to see, it worked really well.

    I'm figuring out that marking a quilt is never going to be quick and easy - but I think I have an option that works pretty well now. Thanks for all the suggestions!

  17. #42
    Super Member patdesign's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Terri Morin View Post
    Gotta try this!!!! Sounds really cool.
    Thanks looks easy
    pat design

  18. #43
    Super Member judykay's Avatar
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    I love all the ideas that have been posted on this topic. Marking & basting my quilt top is me least favorite part of making a quilt.
    Happy Quilting
    Judy in Lower Michigan

  19. #44
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    I print or draw my designs on freezer paper, then cut them out and iron them in place. This way, I am able to sew along the edges and not have to tear things off. When I was learning FMQ, I did this with hearts and other simple designs. Now I do those freehand but use the freezer paper for more complex or unusual designs.

  20. #45
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    This is exactly what I was looking for in my search!

    I had been pondering ideas for making my own stencils. I didn't think of this at all. I was trying to figure out how to use an exacto knife to cut the stencil without making it a nightmare of a mess. Thanks so much for the idea.

  21. #46
    Power Poster ManiacQuilter2's Avatar
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    If I wanted to use a stencil, but it was a wrong size, I would scan it to the size I needed and then placed the copy on top of numerous cut pieces of artist tracing paper. I then sewed carefully following the lines on my Bernina without any thread. I then pinned the tracing paper and quilted following the dots. I never got a stencil burner to make stencils. Just not worth my time.
    A Good Friend, like an old quilt, is both a Treasure and a Comfort

  22. #47
    Super Member judykay's Avatar
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    Fantastic hint, thanks for sharing.

  23. #48
    Senior Member ekuw's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by SittingPretty View Post
    I've heard of using tulle fabric in an embroidery hoop. You mark the design on the tulle with a marker. Then you trace the design through the tulle onto your fabric. You could use a permanent marker on the tulle (NOT ON YOUR QUILT!), if you want to save it, but I guess you could use a washout marker, if you want to use the tulle over again with a different design. As for marking your quilt, some people use the Crayola washable markers. I, too, have found that I have to press harder with the other pencils than the "light touch" in the directions. Otherwise, I like marking with chalk, but it does seem to brush off some.
    I am working on a quilt now where I have used this method. In theory it sounds perfect, but I found that the stencil I traced was more difficult to see after each time I used it. Not sure if it is because my fabric is light, and I used white tulle or what, but I had to make 3 stencils (I did trace 50 wreaths!) to mark my quilt. I'll have to experiment more with different color of tulle maybe. When the stencil was fresh, it worked perfectly :-)

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