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Thread: Mixed Emotions About This

  1. #26
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    thought thesame thing about the pattern prices but the lady lived a wonderful life and enjoyd her passion from the posting

  2. #27
    Super Member BarbaraSue's Avatar
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    While it is sad about the lady, it is nice that she is being remembered in the selling of the fabrics. It isn't just a textile. It was a chosen fabric from a gifted quilter. While sentimental value adds no $$ to the item, it is still appreciated by me that late quilter is acknowledged. And after seeing the fabrics that were on that particular site makes me want to see her finished works. Her choices in fabrics were stunning. IMHO
    To make lots of quilts, is to have lots of scraps, and I do, and I do.
    BarbaraSue

  3. #28
    Super Member butterflies5518's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by jaciqltznok View Post
    what is really sad are the prices she is charging for those books/patterns...yikes,,.
    I noticed that as well! Although I did place 2 small bids on fabrics, we'll see.
    Quilting makes me happy!..

  4. #29
    Super Member Grace MooreLinker's Avatar
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    Mixed Emotions About This

    Quote Originally Posted by BuzzinBumble View Post
    I feel both Sad and Happy over this:
    http://www.ebay.com/itm/3pc-Lot-Yell...item3cc4a485af
    Not the fabrics, but the description:
    "This is from the estate of a avid sewer. This talented, older lady was an avid sewer who had a basement turned into a sewing room filled with fabrics, patterns, 5 sewing machines and everything else you can think of associated with sewing. She also had weakness for soft, rich looking fabrics.While I was not able to acquire any of her finished quilts, I was able to get a hold of many of the fabrics and quilt patterns she had left. Please enjoy!"

    On the one hand, how marvelous for this talented lady that she was able to create a haven for her sewing & quilting and surround herself with things to fuel her passion! But on the other hand, it's so sad she didn't have a chance to use it all. What's that saying? She who dies with the most fabric wins?
    I think the saying is really a let down, how many needy could use a warm quilt out of a stash, which sets on a shelf. so dying with a big staeh has done nothing.
    Freedom is costly and quilting keeps us busy...

  5. #30
    Super Member coopah's Avatar
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    It's good to hear that some of you have told your families exactly what you want done with your stash. They won't have to make decisions about your things as you've already decided what to do. That is a wonderful gift to them.

  6. #31
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    I always say I have to live to be about 200 yrs old to finish all the projects I want to and since I keep seeing more and more I guess I'll probably be like that poor lady at least she seemed to have a lot of joy working on her fabric. Sue

  7. #32
    Super Member burchquilts's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by auntpiggylpn View Post
    I look at it this way. I love fabric. I have a pretty significant stash which brings me much happiness. I will NEVER use all that I have but that doesn't deter me from gathering more. Leaving a stash behind after I am gone doesn't trouble me one bit. I have left specific written instructions for my family as well as discussed with them on how to dispose of my sewing and quilting supplies when I am gone. They know who gets what and what to do with anything that is left over. I even have some rare, highly sought after, hard to find fabrics that are separate from my stash. My family knows that these fabrics are special and will be sold. I also let my family know that if they didn't wish to follow my instructions upon my demise, that is their prerogative. I'm not going to come back and haunt them!!!
    I agree with everything you said. I would like my beloved heirloom Featherweight to stay with my kids but my fabric? I just want it donated to whoever can use it. I know here in WI the women's prison acceps fabric donations to make quilts with & that sounds like a good choice to me. And I, too, have promised my kids that if they thik I;m a royal pain now, just watch if you don't follow my directives... LOL!
    (¯`v´¯)
    `*.¸.*´
    ¸.•´
    ¸.•*¨)¸.•*¨)
    (¸.•´(¸.• (¸.•´¸¸.•¨¯`•.¸¸.♥ rebecca

  8. #33
    Super Member peaceandjoy's Avatar
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    My children have no interest in any crafts; so I know they will not want any of my things when I am no longer able to use them. The guild I belong to does charity quilts, so after a friend or two takes what they would like, the rest will go to towards making charity quilts. That's fine by me!

    In the meantime, I look at my stash the way any collector would look at their things - I enjoy them!

  9. #34
    Senior Member Elaine433's Avatar
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    If we all lived long enough to use up our stash of fabrics, we would have to live into the next century.

  10. #35
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    Sewing was her passion, obviously. She surrounded herself with people (I assume) and fabrics and an area that gave her peace and joy. More power to her. As for all the leftovers after her death... maybe a legacy to pass on of sorts? Fabric isn't cheap, and neither are good machines. My Grandmother, who no longer quilts due to arthritis, gave me the pick of her small stash, and I was very thankful. I'm glad she is still alive to see what I'm doing with the stash, but I can't help but feel a little bit of her going into projects whenever I use what she gave me. Perhaps the recipients of the older lady in OP feel the same? Her money, her stash, her choice. Personally, I don't see anything wrong with it. And like I said, if I was one of her decendents, I would treasure whatever I inherited from it.
    “Creativity is allowing yourself to make mistakes. Art is knowing which ones to keep.” ~Scott Adams

    Piecefully,
    Lisa

  11. #36
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    none of us have enough time to use it all

  12. #37
    Super Member judykay's Avatar
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    When I made up my will I attached a wish list to it stating what I would like my children to do with certain things that I know they don't want. If they do it or not I will never know but I think my daughter will as I was very specific about what I wanted done with my machines, tools and stash.
    Happy Quilting
    Judy in Lower Michigan

  13. #38
    Super Member rosiewell's Avatar
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    Oh but she probably enjoyed the acquisition of all the treasures, for a collector of fabrics like me having the fabric is just as much fun as creating something with it.

  14. #39
    Super Member justflyingin's Avatar
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    Actually, I think of it like anything else we might leave behind, whether china, or pets, or clothing. If it provided the original owner pleasure, and she was able to create with the items, they did serve their purpose...

  15. #40
    Super Member Rose_P's Avatar
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    I just assume I will leave a stash behind. To do otherwise would mean that I must have given up quilting at some point, or else had a very clear idea about when my final departure would occur. I'd rather not plan for that too much! I hope my kids understand the value both to me in having choices close at hand and also for the lucky people who will be happy to find what I've left behind, whether it's at an estate sale or donated for charity.

  16. #41
    Super Member BuzzinBumble's Avatar
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    You all have wonderful outlooks and great attitudes! Love the thoughts you've shared!

  17. #42
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    I am one of the fortunate ones in that both my niece and great niece have a love for quilting. But I have still advised them what to do with the fabric, patterns, books, etc., that they don't want. It is always good to think ahead!

  18. #43
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    Several years before I became a quilter, my husband had attended a locker sale and gave me a suitcase filled with small flat paperbags. Each bag was labeled with the receipent's name and type of garment. Apparently the renter of the locker had died and the contents were auctioned to recoop the unpaid rent. As I went thru each bag, I imagined how much mom/grandma had lovingly she had made each garment, that it made me cry. As some piece were large enough I made my granddaughter a dress. She is now 19 and has saved the dress. I still have the rest of the fabric remments.

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