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Thread: My 6yr old wants to hand quilt her next one

  1. #26
    Super Member klgreene's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by raptureready
    I don't want to sound mean but....
    Teach her the proper way to do it with as small of stitches as she can manage. Tell her the smaller the better. After a few minor pin pricks she'll learn. We can't protect them from every little hurt as much as we want to. Let her learn and part of the learning is learning not to stick yourself.
    Just give her some thimbles and keep encouraging her. Tell her that it will be so beautiful when she gets it done and that yes, it takes a long time but it's worth every minute.

    Every read the story about the butterfly struggling to get out of the cocoon? All the hard work needed to get out also helps them develop so that they can fly. If you open it for them they die. Allow your "butterfly" to develop so that she can fly.
    Teach her the correct way from the start. By the time she's your age or much older, my age, she'll be better than anyone on the board. It's much harder to go back and correct something that was learned wrong, than to start the correct way from the start. I give her so much credit for learning at a young age.

  2. #27
    Super Member greaterexp's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by tortoisethreads
    Oh I definitely want her to learn the correct technique, I was thinking more of this style of quilting...http://4.bp.blogspot.com/_vduCtjwfsP...h/P2170353.JPG I thought it looked really pretty, and she could get used to holding a needle and thread. My handquilting needles are tiny. I might let her use a larger one for her first try. Her quilt is purple and white, so I found some purple embroidery floss. She's excited and knows, although this "thread" is way bigger than mommy's, she will still be quilting.
    This looks like it would be just perfect for little hands of someone just learning. I imagine she would love the colored thread, and she would learn more about making her stitches even. She can learn and perfect tiny stitches later as she matures. What a wonderful gift - for you, to have a daughter interested in learning quilting from you, and for your daughter to have a loving mom to teach her. I hope you'll post a picture of her finished quilt.

  3. #28
    Senior Member Aunt Bea's Avatar
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    Being an experienced hand quilter, I'm not sure I agree with starting big. I made a quilt that called for pearl cotton and large stitches. It was very uncomfortable for me and took me much longer than I thought to finish. Of course, I'm comfortable with an 11 between and quilting thread. I guess my point is, if she gets comfortable with the large needle and stitch, it could be difficult for her to switch. How about loading a hoop with muslim and batting and let her try both methods before starting the quilt. Either way, you are the luckiest mother on earth to have someone so young to pass your skills along to.

  4. #29
    Super Member lfw045's Avatar
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    I can say from experience that quilting with N0.5 Perle cotton is not that easy as it would seem...for example threading the needle and pulling it through. For a youngster it would be even harder to do in my opinion. I would get her some hand quilting thread and let her go for it. It will be easier for her and she won't get as frustrated..

  5. #30
    Super Member misseva's Avatar
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    this reminds me of my dd when she was about 8 and wanted me to teach her to crochet. i thought she was too young but she WAS determined - now she picks the most difficult patterns to work on and has since taught me to knit. aren't dd wonderful?

  6. #31

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    I was 3 yrs. old when my Grandmothers taught me to sew. It was all hand done for the first year. Then they started me out on the machine. My first quilt I was somewhere between 3-4 and my Grandma Horn taught how to make the small quilting stiches. Of corse they weren't purfect but she made me prode of them and incouraged my quilting from that time. I which they were still here. I miss both of them so much. I'm 65 Yrs. Old and have sewing and quilting for the last 62 yrs.

  7. #32
    Super Member bjnicholson's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by tortoisethreads
    Oh I definitely want her to learn the correct technique, I was thinking more of this style of quilting...http://4.bp.blogspot.com/_vduCtjwfsP...h/P2170353.JPG I thought it looked really pretty, and she could get used to holding a needle and thread. My handquilting needles are tiny. I might let her use a larger one for her first try. Her quilt is purple and white, so I found some purple embroidery floss. She's excited and knows, although this "thread" is way bigger than mommy's, she will still be quilting.
    Good idea. If she has the mindset to hand quilt, she must realize the time it takes. I like the floss idea.

  8. #33
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    She is young but if she wants to learn then teach her the correct way because, as we all know, when we start doing something the wrong way it is hard to relearn the correct way. Her quilting may not be perfect to us adults but to her and for her it will be beautiful and what she learns now will mean so much more later on.

  9. #34
    Super Member wildyard's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by tortoisethreads
    Oh I definitely want her to learn the correct technique, I was thinking more of this style of quilting...http://4.bp.blogspot.com/_vduCtjwfsP...h/P2170353.JPG I thought it looked really pretty, and she could get used to holding a needle and thread. My handquilting needles are tiny. I might let her use a larger one for her first try. Her quilt is purple and white, so I found some purple embroidery floss. She's excited and knows, although this "thread" is way bigger than mommy's, she will still be quilting.
    I think that is very doable for a 6 yr old. I started teaching my DGD a similar thing when she was 5 and she did quite well with it. I put my emphasis on making nice even stitches and following the pattern. As she practices, and matures, she can handle smaller needles and finer threads. At 5, my DGD sewed a design on the fabric and then sewed the edges of the fabric together into a pillow cover, all by hand and did a good job of it.

  10. #35
    lgc
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    Quote Originally Posted by tortoisethreads
    Oh I definitely want her to learn the correct technique, I was thinking more of this style of quilting...http://4.bp.blogspot.com/_vduCtjwfsP...h/P2170353.JPG I thought it looked really pretty, and she could get used to holding a needle and thread. My handquilting needles are tiny. I might let her use a larger one for her first try. Her quilt is purple and white, so I found some purple embroidery floss. She's excited and knows, although this "thread" is way bigger than mommy's, she will still be quilting.
    I love this idea! I think for her first hand quilting experience it will turn out great.

  11. #36
    lgc
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    Also, try tiger tape to help keep her stitches the same size

  12. #37
    Super Member kwiltkrazy's Avatar
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    I agree teach her to do it properly first, so she doesn't have to relearn it the right way. BTW great for your daughter, tell her to keep up the good work.

  13. #38
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    How well said. Let her learn the right way, can you imagen if she is tout the right way now, what a beautiful quilter she will be when she is an adult. Good for both of you, and God bless.

  14. #39
    lgc
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    After re-reading the replies, I've come to the conclusion that if you feel your child can understand the traditional way of quilting (6, 8, 12 stitches to the inch [whatever]) then by all means teach away. All I can say is when teaching my child to quilt at 6 or 7; she just wanted a finished quilt. My teaching her to do it right at that age just frustrated her and at 17 the doll quilt is still waiting to be finished.

  15. #40
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    Quote Originally Posted by raptureready
    I don't want to sound mean but....
    Teach her the proper way to do it with as small of stitches as she can manage. Tell her the smaller the better. After a few minor pin pricks she'll learn. We can't protect them from every little hurt as much as we want to. Let her learn and part of the learning is learning not to stick yourself.
    Just give her some thimbles and keep encouraging her. Tell her that it will be so beautiful when she gets it done and that yes, it takes a long time but it's worth every minute.

    Every read the story about the butterfly struggling to get out of the cocoon? All the hard work needed to get out also helps them develop so that they can fly. If you open it for them they die. Allow your "butterfly" to develop so that she can fly.
    I totally agree.

  16. #41
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    I started my DGD when she was 3 to use a thimble. She called it a thumbull. I would stick in the needle and she would pull it out. She is now 10 and has made two quilts and now wants to learn how to make doll clothes.
    I love every minute we get to spend together.

  17. #42
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    I agree teach her right. Thimbles, I didn't start out using one but was killing my hand. I bought leather thimbles which were better but taking out the hard liner and just using the leather worked best. I got an old leather belt and started cutting, then with an upholstery needle and some string, custom thimbles that cost almost nothing.

  18. #43
    Senior Member patimint's Avatar
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    If she wants to quilt, by all means let her. I learned to quilt on bed-size quilts sitting beside my mother, grandmother and aunts. we quilted on "every-day quilts" & as soon as we could do small enough stitches & even stitches we could then quilt on "fancy quilts". And yes, once I learned how, if my stitches were too big, my mother made me take them out & do it again.

  19. #44
    Senior Member Grandmother23's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by tortoisethreads
    Oh I definitely want her to learn the correct technique, I was thinking more of this style of quilting...http://4.bp.blogspot.com/_vduCtjwfsP...h/P2170353.JPG I thought it looked really pretty, and she could get used to holding a needle and thread. My handquilting needles are tiny. I might let her use a larger one for her first try. Her quilt is purple and white, so I found some purple embroidery floss. She's excited and knows, although this "thread" is way bigger than mommy's, she will still be quilting.
    I wish I had granddaughters!!! And I like the look of the stitches on that website. I might have to try that myself. :-D

  20. #45
    lgc
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    It's on my list of things to do now too!

  21. #46
    EC
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    Quote Originally Posted by lgc
    After re-reading the replies, I've come to the conclusion that if you feel your child can understand the traditional way of quilting (6, 8, 12 stitches to the inch [whatever]) then by all means teach away. All I can say is when teaching my child to quilt at 6 or 7; she just wanted a finished quilt. My teaching her to do it right at that age just frustrated her and at 17 the doll quilt is still waiting to be finished.
    I totally agree! There are no rules. I think any project should be age appropriate. If she is truly interested after her first finished quilt, she can start making smaller stitches. I think little ones need to see some progress to hold their attention.

  22. #47
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    Hooray for your very ambitious child!!!! Work with her and encourage her!!!! God bless!!!

  23. #48
    Senior Member Phyl's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by tortoisethreads
    Oh I definitely want her to learn the correct technique, I was thinking more of this style of quilting...http://4.bp.blogspot.com/_vduCtjwfsP...h/P2170353.JPG I thought it looked really pretty, and she could get used to holding a needle and thread. My handquilting needles are tiny. I might let her use a larger one for her first try. Her quilt is purple and white, so I found some purple embroidery floss. She's excited and knows, although this "thread" is way bigger than mommy's, she will still be quilting.
    You are 100% right. Let her use the larger stitches at first. If it is too small, she may get discouraged and stop. She can get the tops of jars or plastic lids to trace around and then stitch on the lines. How wonderful that you have helped to make another generation love to quilt. Congratulations.

  24. #49
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    Quote Originally Posted by tortoisethreads
    Oh I definitely want her to learn the correct technique, I was thinking more of this style of quilting...http://4.bp.blogspot.com/_vduCtjwfsP...h/P2170353.JPG I thought it looked really pretty, and she could get used to holding a needle and thread. My handquilting needles are tiny. I might let her use a larger one for her first try. Her quilt is purple and white, so I found some purple embroidery floss. She's excited and knows, although this "thread" is way bigger than mommy's, she will still be quilting.
    I love the quilt on that blog, which website is it from? I'd love to read more. And I wish someone had taught me to handquilt when I was that young! :)

  25. #50
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    I would love to know more about quilting with a larger thread, too. At a quilt shop last summer I saw some girls quilting with crochet thread but didn't get a chance to talk to them about it(a tour bus group came in). Tha last quilt my Grandmaother made was quilted like this. Her others were all done with the traditional tiny stitches. Unfortunately none of us thought to ask her about it at the time.

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