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Thread: My Microwaveable Corn Bag Caught Fire!!

  1. #51
    Power Poster sewbizgirl's Avatar
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    You know, with all the textiles being made in China and Pakistan, how do we even know they are 100% cotton as they say they are? Obviously they are not!

    I would not put any kind of fabric or fabric with batting in the microwave.
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  2. #52
    Senior Member Momo's Avatar
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    I just got a new microwave because our old one was catching on fire on the metal piece inside. The new microwave instructions state that items placed in the microwave should be a certain height to prevent fires.
    I am guilty of placing a very short dish with some frozen nuts in the old one to defrost. Guess I should have used something taller.
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  3. #53
    Super Member Rose_P's Avatar
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    I made a bag for potatoes just winging it, and this was before I did much quilting. I had seen them in a store and figured I could do that only better . I used Warm and Natural, and in all probability cotton-wrapped poly thread. It worked fine, but I saw absolutely no improvement over the usual microwave potato cooking, and so have just used it as a hot-mat on the table ever since. Is there any chance the batting in yours was Insul-brite, which is not supposed to be used in the microwave because it has metal?

    I cook naked ears of corn under the microwave spatter cover and it turns out great.

    In the future, if there is ever a fire in a microwave, you and all your family members should know that all you should do is turn it off and wait until the fire goes out. It will because there is a limited air supply in there. That's much safer than trying to move a burning item, and was mentioned in the instructions that came with my first microwave. Having a fire extinguisher in the kitchen is also a good idea, and your insurance company might give you a discount if you do that and a few other simple things around the house that can reduce risk.
    Last edited by Rose_P; 05-15-2012 at 08:14 PM.

  4. #54
    Super Member Bluelady's Avatar
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    I have cooked small potatoes in a brown paper bag in the microwave. Come out great!

  5. #55
    Super Member Pam H's Avatar
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    My daughter, my husband and my mom all had theirs catch fire. My theory is that if you only cook 1 small potato there is not enough moisture or steam to prevent the bag from burning. When I cook 2 or more potatoes my bag is very wet by the time they are done cooking. I never leave the bag cooking unattended out of fear of a fire. Potatoes taste so darn good cooked in them that I still want to use the bags!

  6. #56
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    I have heard of so many of these bags starting fires since the craze. My mind keeps wondering, who in their right mind, would put any kind of cloth in a microwave for 8-10 min. And especially anything with polyester, i.e., cotton covered polyester thread. With all the junk made in China now, wouldn't trust any fabric or batting to be 100% anything. A friend of mine works for an after fire clean up company, and we were discussing this a month or so ago. She said, oh well, things like this keep me employed. Got two of the potato bags for Christmas a few years back, they went straight in the wastebasket.

    My potatoes I m/w on the tray and my corn, in a m/w vegetable cooker, with a small bit of water in the bottom. Please keep the cloth out of your m/w ovens.

  7. #57
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    Quote Originally Posted by vivsqt View Post
    You have to use feed corn. I have been using corn bags for years to keep my feet warm at night. The last bag I made, which I used for about three years, before the corn decided that enough was enough and it burnt. But it did not catch fire. I do not use any batting in my bags. Cut your fabric about 9 or 10" sq and put 6 cups of feed corn it, sew it up and you're ready to go. I put my on for 2 minutes on high. First bag was gift and I love it.
    LOL, you're talking about something different ....you made the corn bags for keeping body parts warm....they are talking about the one to cook corn in. Easy to confuse the two from the thread title.

  8. #58
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    Quote Originally Posted by mermaid View Post
    I am curious (and intelligence challenged, I guess).. but when you call it a "corn bag", do you mean to cook corn in?? I've not heard of using the bags for corn, but if you do, would you please share your cooking method? Thanks
    corn bags, potato bags, etc., seems to be another way for LQS to "sell" more fabric..........as far as "cooking" corn...not really necessary...if it fresh-picked you can eat it right there....altho it is not "hot"......corn like tomatoes are ready to eat.....In corn season.....I will remove husk, and put in plastic zip lock and micro for about 3 min......please not salt, butter or anything just the sugar sweetness of that corn is satisfying enough.....my question is how to get all the cornsilk off the cob.........any sure ways out there. I never buy corn on the cob other than from a farm during season........tons of it - for meal eating, salads, relishes, and some freezing....eat and enjoy and each year eagerly wait for corn season again!!!!
    As far as the potato bags...was given one once as a gift.......got rid of it......those get microed easy enough without a "bag"......that is just me...

  9. #59
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    Hi, My experp. is to make it all out of 100% cotton. Poly will catch fire. But we have had no problem with the 100% cotton. If I make any and give away it is always 100% cotton. I have a stash bag to keep only 100%cotton for just that purpose without getting mixed with the other.

  10. #60
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    Quote Originally Posted by ptquilts View Post
    I have been nuking my corn naked (the corn, not me) and it seems to taste fine. I like that it is not dripping with water like if you boiled it.
    Too funny!!
    After boiling the corn, I use tongs to remove it from the water, place the corn in a colander and then place the colander back over the corn water pan to continue dripping. My colander is large enough to sit directly on the rim of the pan. I also place a tin foil tent over the corn to keep the heat on the corn before serving.

  11. #61
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    My FIL would pull the husks back, remover the silk and replace the husks, freeze in bags and in middle of winter have corn that tasted like it had just been picked. He microwaved it. Never used a bag to cook them that I know of.

  12. #62
    Super Member nannya54's Avatar
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    Honestly, I haven't read everyone's responses so perhaps this has already been mentioned and questioned and if so, my apologies........

    Did you happen to put any moist food in the bag to cook or did you just put the dry cotton and dry batting and dry thread in the microwave? It's the moisture on and in the food being cooked that helps the bag from NOT burning. Just a thought since I didn't see in you statement that there was anything.

  13. #63
    Super Member Ps 150's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by nannya54 View Post
    Honestly, I haven't read everyone's responses so perhaps this has already been mentioned and questioned and if so, my apologies........

    Did you happen to put any moist food in the bag to cook or did you just put the dry cotton and dry batting and dry thread in the microwave? It's the moisture on and in the food being cooked that helps the bag from NOT burning. Just a thought since I didn't see in you statement that there was anything.
    Honestly, I'm not sure that DH moistened the bag or not. He doesn't seem to remember. I know our potato bag was dry when I tested it and it came out of the microwave after 5 minutes, absolutely fine. Perhaps we just got lucky.
    "Love is not love which alters when it alteration finds, or bends with the remover to remove."

  14. #64
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    pardon me for asking - but are you sure its ok (health wise) to nuke a zip lock bag? I know a few years ago they put out not to let plastic wrap touch anything with grease/fat - like meat while microwaving - can be cancerous(?). Think I'd rather do any one of the other ways mentioned here - naked, natural (husk), paper towel, waxed paper or fabric.

  15. #65
    Super Member Ps 150's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by ashiecat View Post
    pardon me for asking - but are you sure its ok (health wise) to nuke a zip lock bag? I know a few years ago they put out not to let plastic wrap touch anything with grease/fat - like meat while microwaving - can be cancerous(?). Think I'd rather do any one of the other ways mentioned here - naked, natural (husk), paper towel, waxed paper or fabric.
    No, I would never use plastic. The corn bags were made out of cotton fabric.
    "Love is not love which alters when it alteration finds, or bends with the remover to remove."

  16. #66
    Super Member nannya54's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ps 150 View Post
    Honestly, I'm not sure that DH moistened the bag or not. He doesn't seem to remember. I know our potato bag was dry when I tested it and it came out of the microwave after 5 minutes, absolutely fine. Perhaps we just got lucky.
    I've made and sold hundreds of potato/corn bags and only 2 caught on fire. One person left the safety pin on it that held the instructions and the other hadn't been washed after making sweet potatoes (the juice is very volatile) in it. That's not the bags fault in either case. The food to be cooked has to be damp and you have to put a wet paper towel around the item. It's that moisture that not only cooks the food so lovely, it's the moisture that stops anything from burning. Put dry food in the oven, it will burn. Put dry food in a skillet or sauce pan, it will burn. Cooking needs moisture. Dry cotton will burn. You made your bag just fine with all cotton materials. Try it again and actually cook something with a damp, or just plain wet, paper towel wrapped around it and you'll end up liking it more than the ol' oven method or boiled method.

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