Welcome to the Quilting Board!

Already a member? Login above
loginabove
OR
To post questions, help other quilters and reduce advertising (like the one on your left), join our quilting community. It's free!

Page 1 of 2 1 2 LastLast
Results 1 to 25 of 45

Thread: Need help to get past just stitching in the ditch!

  1. #1
    Super Member montanajan's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
    Location
    NW Montana
    Posts
    1,318
    Blog Entries
    1
    Fairly new quilter - have several tops ready to be quilted, usually do small projects to avoid any quilting that is complicated. How did you experienced quilters go beyond basics in machine finishing? I've done cathedral windows, quilt-as-you-go & in the ditch - my attempts at even meandering look so messy I've quit trying. HELP!

  2. #2
    pab
    pab is offline

    Join Date
    Nov 2010
    Posts
    540
    Blog Entries
    13
    When I started out I needed to practice ,practice practice.Things do get betterr and once the quilt is washedthe boo-boos disappear...dont get discouraged.pab

  3. #3
    Super Member montanajan's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
    Location
    NW Montana
    Posts
    1,318
    Blog Entries
    1
    Quote Originally Posted by pab
    When I started out I needed to practice ,practice practice.Things do get betterr and once the quilt is washedthe boo-boos disappear...dont get discouraged.pab
    Thanks for the encouragement

  4. #4
    Senior Member CompulsiveQuilter's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2010
    Location
    Knoxville, TN
    Posts
    745
    I took the plunge to FMQ with placemats - the first set for myself, so it didn't matter so much that they were ... uh, WAY less than perfect. Second meandering attempt was placemats for my mom - who would think they were wonderful no matter what. SMALL SMALL projects was the key for me. I'm getting a little more confident and ready to tackle a lap quilt next. Keep practicing!

  5. #5
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Location
    Kansas City area USA
    Posts
    445
    Baby quilts helped me get over the hump!! Big enough to teach you how to handle fabric while free motioning but nothing like a King size monster. Babies don't care and Moms are too frazled to notice seams that don't match or quilting that is ''strange''.....she is just thankful for a clean blanket with pretty colors!! And yes, after a good washing/drying, most of the quilt designs ''soften'' and goofs are really not noticable.

    Dog beds/mats for a local shelter is another good idea for practice pieces.

    jodi in leavenworth

  6. #6
    Super Member SuziC's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    Upstate NY
    Posts
    3,711
    I agree with the others, practice is the key. Start small and keep going..you will get better at it the more you do it. Don't stress...it's suppose to be fun :!: :!: :!: :!: :!:

  7. #7
    Super Member sewcrafty's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Location
    New Hampshire
    Posts
    3,958
    Just make a sandwich and go go go!! A lot of women can put the pedal to the metal and do it great, me I set machine at low-med speed and enjoy. Also, check your manual for the correct tension, you might have to adjust it to avoid the eyelashes on the back.

  8. #8
    Super Member SherriB's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Location
    Quilting somewhere......
    Posts
    2,844
    Blog Entries
    40
    I am right there with you! I have tried FMQ but just can't get the tension right on my machine. I have a Singer 301 and Santa is bringing a darning foot for it. I hope to try FMQ after Christmas. Lots of members say it is easier to FMQ on the older machines.

  9. #9
    Super Member candi's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Location
    NE The Sunshine State
    Posts
    4,071
    I am right there with you. I have a muslin sandwich next to my machine, and I practice almost every time I sit on the machine for a couple of minutes, it DOES get better. I am now at the point where my stippling on small size quilts look OK. Can't for the life of me do it on bigger quilts, too unorganized and the quilt is heavy. But I did ask Santa for the FM slider to help the bigger quilt "slide" on your machine, so maybe this will help.

    Also, a couple of things that helped me where reducing the motor speed to half, and then floor the pedal, this way the speed is constant, and I can just control moving the fabric.

    We will get it one day:)

  10. #10
    Super Member yetta's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2010
    Location
    Manassas Va.
    Posts
    1,242
    Quote Originally Posted by candi
    I am right there with you. I have a muslin sandwich next to my machine, and I practice almost every time I sit on the machine for a couple of minutes, it DOES get better. I am now at the point where my stippling on small size quilts look OK. Can't for the life of me do it on bigger quilts, too unorganized and the quilt is heavy. But I did ask Santa for the FM slider to help the bigger quilt "slide" on your machine, so maybe this will help.

    Also, a couple of things that helped me where reducing the motor speed to half, and then floor the pedal, this way the speed is constant, and I can just control moving the fabric.

    We will get it one day:)
    me too...hang in there...I keep thinking I am being given the opportunity to practice patience and fmq at the same time,

  11. #11
    deema's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2010
    Location
    Ontario, Canada
    Posts
    1,317
    I haven't tried yet, either. I need to get a darning foot for my machine. My plan for practice is that I'm going to make myself a large quilt and kind of quilt as you go...breaking it up into 4 or 6 manageable portions (depending on how big it ends up! lol) and FMQ each portion then attach them together. I'm not doing it a block at a time because I just don't wanna. lol

  12. #12
    Banned
    Join Date
    Mar 2010
    Location
    Sturbridge, Ma
    Posts
    4,014
    Check out the book "Foolproof Machine Quilting" by Mary Mashuta. I believe that is the title. It is often assumed that machine quilting is only in the ditch and free motion. This book show how the walking foot can be used in more decorative machine quilting.

  13. #13
    Super Member montanajan's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
    Location
    NW Montana
    Posts
    1,318
    Blog Entries
    1
    Placemats - manageable size for sure - I'm making a few small tabletoppers & may try fmq (just figured out what those letters mean LOL on them. Thanks for encouragement.

  14. #14
    Super Member montanajan's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
    Location
    NW Montana
    Posts
    1,318
    Blog Entries
    1
    Quote Originally Posted by Holice
    Check out the book "Foolproof Machine Quilting" by Mary Mashuta. I believe that is the title. It is often assumed that machine quilting is only in the ditch and free motion. This book show how the walking foot can be used in more decorative machine quilting.
    I'll see if I can find it - thanks for suggestion.

  15. #15
    Super Member Farm Quilter's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2010
    Location
    Odessa, Washington
    Posts
    1,907
    Lead Day has an outstanding blog where she gives you designs to quilt on a DSM...and she posts videos of her doing the designs on quilt squares. I use her designs on my longarm - they are awesome! Her blog is: http://www.freemotionquilting.blogspot.com/

  16. #16
    Peggi's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Location
    Mich. beautiful U.P.
    Posts
    166
    Wish I could remember (a sign of old age) the exact sites I've been into about FMQ but one I did enjoy watching was:
    http://www.sharonschambernetwork.com/default.asprx. Good luck to you - FMQ always scares me half to death but it is true, after they are washed you don't notice.

  17. #17

    Join Date
    Nov 2010
    Location
    Texas
    Posts
    10
    When I learned to free motion I started with "Quilting Made Easy" It's done with paper and they are all over patterns. The long edges have an adhesive that sticks to the quilt but leaves no residue. You have lines to follow but if you go off the lines it doesn't matter.The one thing that you have to do is baste your quilt. You can't pin them because you can't see the pins. The do have a website www.QuiltingMadeEasy.com. I no longer have to use the paper. It's a good teacher.

  18. #18
    community benefactor stitchofclass2's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2010
    Location
    Illinois & Wisconsin
    Posts
    831
    Blog Entries
    33
    My DIL and also have read this - use a pencil and paper and draw your meandering over and over until it just flows without much thought. Then go to your machine and do a practice piece and then you are good to go! Hope this helps.

  19. #19
    Super Member noveltyjunkie's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Location
    53 degrees North
    Posts
    1,668
    Blog Entries
    3
    I hear you! Somehow I seem to get worse the more I think about it.....

    This may sound really odd but sometimes (if I am quilting in the evening!) I have a beer first to stop me tensing up and over-thinking everything. I haven't got it yet but the trick with this sort of activity is that your brain has to learn it physically so that it "just happens"- like riding a bike. In order for your brain to reach that stage it has to experience it. Lots of times.

    Sadly this means you have to look at the iffy results while your brain is laying down those neural pathways, but you can always save some off cuts of batting and cheap pieces and just agree in advance that they are going straight in the bin if you think they will be too scary to look at!

    Urg. I have created an image of riding a bike while drinking a beer, havent I? Not good.

  20. #20
    Senior Member Dingle's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Location
    So. Nevada
    Posts
    848
    I can't seem to do it either. I'm real bored with SID. I'm doing it right now and hate it. I have tried small sandwiches but get discouraged real quick and stop. I think I may end up being one of the people who just make the tops and quit. What a waste!

  21. #21
    Super Member soccertxi's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2010
    Location
    Glendale AZ
    Posts
    1,502
    Oh :::shudder::: I have one of my 1st FMQ practice pieces to remind me of how far I have come! I agree that practice is the key. The other two things that helped me was www.pajamaquilter.com and a white board. You can practice your 'doodling' with out being afraid of messing up fabric. What ever you can draw (don't put your elbow down), you can quilt. Be brave...oh..and some music and a glass of wine don't hurt!

  22. #22
    Super Member Yvonne's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    Humboldt County, California
    Posts
    1,733
    The best piece of advice I've received for fmq was to worry only about the part of the quilt that's under the needle. The rest will take care of itself. Much easier to quilt one block than to think of the whole project!
    The other thing that I think helps is give yourself a project that you can "play" on. In other words, anything goes and you don't have to worry about it being perfect. My scrappy log cabin was my latest "play time" quilt. I have many!
    Another suggestion is to pick a shape that's easy for you to use. I can make hearts til the cows come home. I now make really neat vines with heart shaped leaves.
    Best suggestion I can give you - Go have some fun! Play!
    P.S. I remember in a much earlier discussion of fmq someone suggesting a glass of wine and music.

  23. #23
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2010
    Location
    Alaska
    Posts
    366
    Something that helped me is to 'doodle' the design you want to make on paper. I went through pages & pages of paper doodling it. I can't make round circles to save my soul, but practicing on paper & then on a quilt sandwich helps a lot. It's like playing the piano - the more you practice, the better & more confident you get.

  24. #24
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Location
    Dalton, MN
    Posts
    338
    Blog Entries
    1
    I'm also new to quilting and get lost with some words. What is Ditch quilting? What does SID stand for? I think I have figured out the rest.

  25. #25
    Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Posts
    36
    I'm still in the dark about what all those initials mean. In your letter you used fmq and lol. I draw a blank on both and others that I have seen in other links. HELP! Maybe I should ask Konstantin for a vocabulary abbreviation list. Flo. [email protected]

Page 1 of 2 1 2 LastLast

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

SEO by vBSEO ©2011, Crawlability, Inc.