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Thread: Need Help on Satin Stitch

  1. #1
    Super Member Jenniky's Avatar
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    Need Help on Satin Stitch

    Im working on a quilt that has applique. So far all applique I have in my short quilting has bee done using the blanket stitch which I learned from a class. I would like to make this quilt using the satin stitch to go around the applique. Here is a picture of my result. Im not real happy with it. I had a lot of trouble with the tight turns and lots of puckering of the fabric as you can see. Was hoping for some help or links to good tutorials on this sort of stitching. Thanks in advance for helping.
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    Have an awesome day!

  2. #2
    Senior Member MoanaWahine's Avatar
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    I have been holding off on doing this for the same reason you are asking this question. I have been told one thing, when doing a satin stitch applique, you will need a stabilizer on the back to help in the puckering and shrinkage. Have not tried this yet, so waiting to see what a more experienced person states. Thanks for the question on this.
    Julie

  3. #3
    Super Member Val in IN's Avatar
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    Actually, it's not that bad for your first attempt. As with everything else, it's a matter of practice and "tweaking" your stitch adjustments. Next time, perhaps try using a stabilizer on the back, just like you would for machine embroidery, because that is essentially what you are doing when you satin stitch. It may help with the puckering. Good for you for trying a new tenchnique! This is how we learn and grow
    "I've always been crazy, but it's kept me from going insane!"
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  4. #4
    Super Member Nanamoms's Avatar
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    Goodness, you didn't do a bad job at all! Sometime even using an embroidery machine, you will get puckers. I don't have any links to share; however, you can press the puckers out. Lay a towel on your ironing board with the applique face done and press (not iron) with steam. Check it every few seconds so that you don't over press.

    Hopefully another board member can give you some tips also!!

  5. #5
    Senior Member crashnquilt's Avatar
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    Satin stitch is a dense stitch so you do need a stabilizer on the back. I would suggest a medium to heavy weight tearaway stabilizer. That should be easy to remove once your stitching is done.
    Crashnquilt


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  6. #6
    Super Member Lori S's Avatar
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    I use Stitch and Tear ( stabilizer ) for all of my satin stitch applique , it makes a world of difference. When doing satin stitch the heavier the stabilzer the better the results.

  7. #7
    Super Member trif's Avatar
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    Yes on stabilizer, also looks like you just need to stop, with needle down and pivot, then restart on your turns, this will help on turns, you really did a good job for first attempt. Don't be to hard on yourself.

  8. #8
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    What most of the other posters said about stabilizer. I use a fairly heavy tear away stabilizer when I am doing satin stitch applique, and rarely if ever have puckering problems. Also, I experiment (most every time, because I forget from one experience to another) with needle placement and turning. For example, if I'm turning fabric to the right should my needle stop - before the turn - on the right or the left. One of these days I'll write it down after I again experiment....
    and by the way, I think that your applique is lovely, and I am sure with some heavy duty pressing you can get those puckers under control.
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  9. #9
    Super Member jcrow's Avatar
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    I've never done the satin stitch and I'm so glad that I read this thread as I was thinking about doing it for my wall hanging I just finished. I never thought about stabilizer. Thanks QB members!
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  10. #10
    Super Member Treasureit's Avatar
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    Agree with needing stabilizer. I do a lot of machine applique and I use coffee filters for stabilizer and don't have a problem. Turns take some practice... turning left stop with the needle down to the right. Right turn - needle down on the left. You better try that on a practice piece first...it is hard to remember without doing it.

  11. #11
    Super Member Chicca's Avatar
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    I really love to do the satin stitch applique. All of the responses are wonderful. You did a great job on your first attempt...you should have seen mine. LOL. But, I agree that stabilizer is the key factor to improve the puckering. Recently, I discovered using the free motion quilting foot, with feed dogs down, stitch length at 0 and the width at what you desire; I really am enjoying the freedom it gives me. I am in total control and can clearly see where each stitch will go. I hope that you continue to experiment and have a great time creating.
    Last edited by Chicca; 03-30-2012 at 09:54 AM. Reason: I forgot a couple words
    Brenda

  12. #12
    Super Member Christine-'s Avatar
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    I tend to stay away from heavy stabilizer in a quilt, unless it's a water soluble, because the thickness under the satin stitching seems out of place on a soft quilt.

    You can use a light stabilizer if you starch the block fabric you're stitching on. Place the light stabilizer under the starched block, add your applique pieces and you'll find it works nicely.

    Christine-
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  13. #13
    Power Poster Prism99's Avatar
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    I too think that's very good for a first attempt.

    What I do is heavily starch the background fabric before cutting the square (and I cut larger than necessary in case there is some distortion during sewing). Heavy starch provides enough stabilization so I do not have to add a stabilizer. My method for starching is to mix a 1:1 solution of Sta-Flo liquid laundry starch and water, "paint" it on with a large wall painting brush until the fabric is saturated, dry in dryer, then iron with steam.

    I have not needed it so far, but if I felt the need for additional stabilizer I would simply add a layer of Stitch n Ditch (inexpensive very lightweight paper purchased from Amazon). This would be easy to remove afterwards and would not make the satin stitch any more stiff.

    You might want to try out a couple of different stabilizers (including my starch method) on some practice blocks to find out which you like best.

  14. #14
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    you might try using a little fabric glue or fusing the applique to the fabric. I've done both and haven't had a problem with using either. Stabilizer is a big help I have also used coffee filters and they work fine for applique and embroidery.

  15. #15
    Super Member applique's Avatar
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    Stabilizer

    I also use stabilizer under my applique. I prefer wall liner by the roll from Lowe's or Home Depot since I do very large applique quilts and hangings and this is a very cheap source (about $14 for a roll). When you lift the presser foot to readjust the piece you want the needle to start right next to the last stitch so there is no gap in the stitches. To turn a corner, restitch from the top right over the stitches that you just made. For a point make sure you stay on the fabric and don't stitch off on either side. Rember to keep your stitches perpendicular to the piece as you go, this is why you have to keep repositioning the needle as you go around a circle. The smaller the circle the more you have to reposition.
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    Debbie
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  16. #16
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    I use freezer paper as stabilizer. It works wonders.

  17. #17
    Super Member LivelyLady's Avatar
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    That is so pretty! A stabilizer would definitely help and it also makes moving the piece easier, too. I use coffee filters for my stabilizer. I buy a pkg of a 100 at the dollar store. They iron flat, tear easily, and are acid free.
    When you sleep under a quilt, you sleep under a blanket of love.

  18. #18
    Super Member Jenniky's Avatar
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    Lots of wonderful help thank you all for your replies and I will of course be testing and experimenting all of the suggestions to see what works for me.. Especially thanks for help on where to stop the needle that is a big problem Im having. I'm going to ask now a question that should be clear to me but is not unfortunately. "Does the stabilizer go under the background piece or under the cut out design like the flower itself. I used the Heat N Bond ultrahold on the back of those pieces that I Ironed onto my background. I really like what was mentioned about applique on a soft blanket. This is for a blanket for my grand-daughter and would like to not have stiffness that will be uncozy so possibly the heavy starch method might be a good thing.
    Have an awesome day!

  19. #19
    Super Member Jenniky's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by applique View Post
    I also use stabilizer under my applique. I prefer wall liner by the roll from Lowe's or Home Depot since I do very large applique quilts and hangings and this is a very cheap source (about $14 for a roll). When you lift the presser foot to readjust the piece you want the needle to start right next to the last stitch so there is no gap in the stitches. To turn a corner, restitch from the top right over the stitches that you just made. For a point make sure you stay on the fabric and don't stitch off on either side. Rember to keep your stitches perpendicular to the piece as you go, this is why you have to keep repositioning the needle as you go around a circle. The smaller the circle the more you have to reposition.
    Thank you so much for sharing you pictures. The Moose is awesome. I will practice practice and practice more using your tips and all the other wonderful Tip and Suggestions. Thank you QB members
    Have an awesome day!

  20. #20
    Super Member Jenniky's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jenniky View Post
    Lots of wonderful help thank you all for your replies and I will of course be testing and experimenting all of the suggestions to see what works for me.. Especially thanks for help on where to stop the needle that is a big problem Im having. I'm going to ask now a question that should be clear to me but is not unfortunately. "Does the stabilizer go under the background piece or under the cut out design like the flower itself. I used the Heat N Bond ultrahold on the back of those pieces that I Ironed onto my background. I really like what was mentioned about applique on a soft blanket. This is for a blanket for my grand-daughter and would like to not have stiffness that will be uncozy so possibly the heavy starch method might be a good thing.
    Still looking for help on answering my question: "Does the stabilizer go under the background piece or under the cut out design. Thanks
    Have an awesome day!

  21. #21
    Member pamelainsa's Avatar
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    Here is a link to some hints that might help you.

    http://www.allpeoplequilt.com/techni...-tips_ss1.html

  22. #22
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    Believe it or not, I always use a piece of notebook paper or typing paper under mine and it works like a charm.

  23. #23
    Super Member Jenniky's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by pamelainsa View Post
    Here is a link to some hints that might help you.

    http://www.allpeoplequilt.com/techni...-tips_ss1.html
    Perfect.... Thank you so much Pamelainsa. Pictures are worth a thousand words sometimes...especially for me. I dont know why I couldnt find this on my own but thanks
    Have an awesome day!

  24. #24
    Power Poster Prism99's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jenniky View Post
    "Does the stabilizer go under the background piece or under the cut out design like the flower itself. I used the Heat N Bond ultrahold on the back of those pieces that I Ironed onto my background. I really like what was mentioned about applique on a soft blanket. This is for a blanket for my grand-daughter and would like to not have stiffness that will be uncozy so possibly the heavy starch method might be a good thing.
    The stabilizer goes underneath the background fabric, next to the feed dogs. It does not even have to be secured to the background fabric; you can just place a piece of paper underneath your background fabric and sew. The Stitch and Ditch I recommended (if necessary, in addition to heavy starching) is very lightweight and will pull away easily from your stitches afterwards.

    Instead of Heat n Bond, you might want to try MistyFuse (and there is another called I think Shade Fuse that is similar). Misty Fuse is a *very* soft fusible that does not add stiffness. It does not come with a paper backing, but that is not a problem as you can simply use a sheet of parchment paper to protect your iron, ironing board, etc. (Parchment paper is inexpensive and sold with other kitchen products such as freezer paper, aluminum foil, etc.). MistyFuse is available on Amazon and eBay; I have not seen it sold locally yet.

  25. #25
    Super Member applique's Avatar
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    Fusibles

    You can iron two pieces of parchment paper to the Misty Fuse and have a paper backed fusible which will be very soft and still trace or draw on the paper. You can also use the fusible paper backed and cut out the excess in the middle of the pieces before fusing (called windowing) see picture below. Usually the "ultra" weights are the heaviest and the most difficult to stitch through. Some even say on them not for sewing.
    Attached Images Attached Images
    Last edited by applique; 04-01-2012 at 04:28 AM.
    Debbie
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