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Thread: Newbie Question

  1. #26
    blueribbontoes's Avatar
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    I laughed when someone above said that there are so such thing as mistakes. I am still a newbie, I started quilting a little over 16 months ago. I made a quilt for my daughter, who incidently is 17 months old. I made the quilt from 6 inch fabric squares that my family, extended and inlaws included, gave me for the quilt. Some squares were from my baby's great great grandmother! Anyhow, I finished the quilt and none of the rows matched up. Not one. It was BAD, but I was still pretty proud. Mismatched, yes, but regardless it was my first effort. I brought it in recently to get quilted, and the lady I hired TOOK apart the quilt and redid it! I was crushed. (it was like taking apart a child's noodle project and straightening the noodles. ) I guess I learned a valueable lesson: practice on something that doesn't have sentimental value! The quilt is now beautiful, but it isn't MY quilt any longer! I guess we all have to start somewhere. Good luck and have fun.

  2. #27
    blueribbontoes's Avatar
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    SORRY for the double post!

  3. #28
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    Quote Originally Posted by blueribbontoes
    I laughed when someone above said that there are so such thing as mistakes. I am still a newbie, I started quilting a little over 16 months ago. I made a quilt for my daughter, who incidently is 17 months old. I made the quilt from 6 inch fabric squares that my family, extended and inlaws included, gave me for the quilt. Some squares were from my baby's great great grandmother! Anyhow, I finished the quilt and none of the rows matched up. Not one. It was BAD, but I was still pretty proud. Mismatched, yes, but regardless it was my first effort. I brought it in recently to get quilted, and the lady I hired TOOK apart the quilt and redid it! I was crushed. (it was like taking apart a child's noodle project and straightening the noodles. ) I guess I learned a valueable lesson: practice on something that doesn't have sentimental value! The quilt is now beautiful, but it isn't MY quilt any longer! I guess we all have to start somewhere. Good luck and have fun.
    I'm glad you posted this - because there have been times when I've been tempted to "fix" someone else's effort. I'm learning to compliment what I can - maybe the color, the idea, whatever - and keep my mouth shut about the rest. Although if I was the quilter, I am pretty sure I would have asked permission before messing with it - or I would have sent it back and not touched it if it bothered me too much to work on it the way it was.

  4. #29
    Super Member mary quite contrary's Avatar
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    How sad that someone messed with your work.

  5. #30
    Super Member GailG's Avatar
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    I agree with bearisgray and QuiltinLee about finding that quarter inch. I like the graph paper trick. Will certainly use it. Thanks. You people are just TOO smart. :lol:

  6. #31
    Super Member GailG's Avatar
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    To blueribbontoes, I think the lesson that I would have learned from this episode would have been NEVER to use that quilter again. She really assumed a lot by doing that. She definitely should have asked you first.

  7. #32
    Super Member gcathie's Avatar
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    Gee you got some great advice from everyone....best thing is jump in get your feet wet....we all learn from our mistakes and practice....practice....practice ....but have Fun....

  8. #33
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    Quote Originally Posted by gcathie
    Gee you got some great advice from everyone....best thing is jump in get your feet wet....we all learn from our mistakes and practice....practice....practice ....but have Fun....
    That quilter should have asked permisson before she undid one stitch or as stated, give it back and not work on it. Oh boy, did I ever get my feet wet this morning :!: They are now soggy :roll: Tried meandering, from a distance it's ok but I need lots of practice, practice, practice. And need to breathe :D

  9. #34
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    Hi all, i'm from West Virgina i would love to have some help with making a set of quilting frames my hubby made me a set many years ago but i must have left them when we moved i like to have the woodens kind they have 4 horese one on each end i know this talk may sound funny to you all be i'm very country and i just love the look of country fid.I guess you say i'm from the old school i just love to sew i'm making some throws for the house and also some for Christmas gifts any help would greatly appericated God Bless :)

  10. #35
    Super Member mary quite contrary's Avatar
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    I would check at farm auctions. Those kind sell for a whole lot less than it would cost you to make new ones and they would have a whole lot more charactar. I have my great grandmothers old frame so I know what you are talking about.

  11. #36
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    Thanks Mary,my friend said she may have one of those horses so hubby could get a patern from i sure hope so my last set only cost like twenty five dollars to make he use furring strips for the long sides and it work very good can you believe i don't even have a picture of the other ones or he could have use it to go by you lose a lot of things when moving but thanks sweetie God Bless

  12. #37
    blueribbontoes's Avatar
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    I showed the quilt to many people before getting it done, and it really wasn't THAT bad. My rows just didn't line up perfectly. I know perfectionists would of gone batty! Its funny though, because as I keep quilting I find that I take things apart a million times to get it perfect. I ddin't mind the mistakes so much in my first, because it was my first quilt for my first baby. I am a sentemental type of gal, though. :D

    I guess what made me frustrated because she didn't ask. One man's trash is another's treasure...

    Be patient with us newbies! We're learning! Ha!

    (Sorry for hijacking the thread.)


  13. #38
    Senior Member GiGi's Avatar
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    To ensure a good cut, you must square the fabric first. After you have folded your fabric in half, take your long ruler, line it up top and bottom then cut. This ensures you have a straight edge to begin cutting. Always remember that no fabric, regardless of brand name/manufacturer is straight/square off the bolt. You have to square it for perfect cutting.

    Hope this helps. GiGi

    P.S. Remember, everyone was a beginner. We all made and continue to make mistakes. It's part of quilting. Good Luck. :D :D

  14. #39
    Super Member GailG's Avatar
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    BRT, another thing that you will learn through experience is how to MAKE things fit. When the blocks are not quite the same size, they is a certain degree of it that can be either stretched or eased into place. Then the steam iron can take care of the rest. Of course, it it's a great deal off, that may be another story. I match seams, then if one piece is a little bigger than the other, I put the bigger one on the bottom, close to the feed dogs. That does the trick most of the time. Then, too, the walking foot helps for that too. Just stick with it. :lol:

  15. #40
    kd124's Avatar
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    BRT---That is so sad. I would have been so tempted to refuse to pay the entire amount for ruining a keepsake. Sure hope you never went back to her.

  16. #41

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    Hi, I would cut 4 1/2 strips the width of the fabric and then cut those into the squares. I strip piece as much as possible. I bought myself a ruler that is 6 x 23 inches so it will measure across the with of fabric as it comes from the store.
    See if there is a shop in your area that does a block of the month. You pay a small fee and get instruction and the pattern and fabric. It's a fun way to make quilting friends, learn new tricks of the trade, and an inexpensive night out with the "girls'

    Happy quilting - just a warning it is highly addictive!
    Mary

  17. #42
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    Well I am a fairly new quilter also. The first thing I learned was
    Get a large cutting board.
    Second.
    A large ruler
    Third
    A good Olaf cutter
    Fourth
    Cut straight as possible (sic) yeah beginners don't.
    Fifth
    Go with it. Read books, go to quilting bloggers sites, see how people do and most of all have fun with it.
    I made a twin size quilt for my first project. Of course Ididn't know about the quilt shrinking a bit (15") when I quilted it. But I learned about measuring and I love quilting.
    http://[email protected]
    You can see what a beginner goofs at and still loves it. My blog has been a journey in the quilting world.
    Hope this helps you.

    I

  18. #43
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    Gosh, I'd say stick with a VERY simple pattern. 4 or 9 patch. Until you get the hang of everything..... I guess I'm not much help, so I'll leave that up to the Pros on here. BUT I do want to welcome you from rainy and cold Washington

  19. #44
    Super Member marla's Avatar
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    When you buy a ruler, try to get all the same brand as some may be off 1/16 or so from another brand. I like Olfa. Also get the sandpaper dots to use on the back of your ruler. This keeps the ruler from slipping on the material. Walk your fingers up the ruler as you cut. Start with only a double fold piece of material until you are confident with your accuracy. Double check your measurements before cutting. Good luck!

  20. #45
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    Quote Originally Posted by marla
    When you buy a ruler, try to get all the same brand as some may be off 1/16 or so from another brand. I like Olfa. Also get the sandpaper dots to use on the back of your ruler. This keeps the ruler from slipping on the material. Walk your fingers up the ruler as you cut. Start with only a double fold piece of material until you are confident with your accuracy. Double check your measurements before cutting. Good luck!
    Excellent advice!!!!

    1/16 doesn't seem like much, but if you have four strips (3 seams), and a consistent seam allowance that's 6/16 (3/8) of an inch difference.

    I've heard there's a frosted brand out that's even nicer than Ominigrid - is that the Olfa you mentioned? I've found Omnigrid rulers to be quite accurate. (I worked with engineers that wanted accuracy down to plus or minus a thousandth of an inch) Can't get that with fabric.

  21. #46
    Super Member GailG's Avatar
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    bearisgray, accuracy is one thing, but that kind of accuracy can take the fun out of quilting, huh. :lol:

  22. #47
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    if you can get 1/4 inch pressure foot for your machine, do so. It makes sewing 1/4 inch so much easier. I have only had for a couple years and it improves you accuracy 100%. Check it out. You'll love it.

  23. #48
    blueribbontoes's Avatar
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    Thanks for all the great tips!

  24. #49
    Super Member GailG's Avatar
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    Haha, Loretta. If that's the case I have four fat-quarters. Probably all that sitting I do at the machine (and maybe the jelly rolls :lol: )

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