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Thread: Not warm enough

  1. #1
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    I made a quilt for my son and he said he wishes it was a little warmer. I think I used a poly batting. I was wondering if there is a warmer batt or should I double up? FayZ

  2. #2
    Super Member butterflies5518's Avatar
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    I am unable to answer your question - we live in Texas, but as a newbie will be watching responses for those in the know. Thanks for asking,

  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by FayZ
    I made a quilt for my son and he said he wishes it was a little warmer. I think I used a poly batting. I was wondering if there is a warmer batt or should I double up? FayZ
    There is a batting out there called Thermore made by Hobbs. It is just about the same as the old Thinsulate batting that used to be sold. Very warm and lightweight. Just can't use fabric softener when its washed. I use it very frequently. It really comes in handy here in Buffalo in the winter!

    Also...I use it with anti-pill fleece for the backing. When I make quilts like this, people tell me its the only covering they need at night when its cold.

  4. #4
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    We use warm and natural here in IN. It is very warm and light weight. IMO.

  5. #5
    Super Member QultingaddictUK's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by S D G
    We use warm and natural here in IN. It is very warm and light weight. IMO.
    I love using W n N when I can afford it, I made a lovely warm quilt with it and also backed it with a lovely flannel, it turned out so cosy.

  6. #6
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    I would say unless you are MQ'ing, do not double up your batting. I use W&N 100% cotton batting and I've had nothing but positive comments about how warm the quilt it is. I made the mistake of doubling this and hand quilting on my first quilt. Doable but painful. And probably not necessary based on later experience.

  7. #7
    Power Poster Sadiemae's Avatar
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    Warm and Natural is warmer than Poly, or you can use wool is you want it warmer. If you wamt to double the batting, I would use a cotton batting like warm and natural along with a wool batting.

  8. #8
    Super Member jmabby's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by meemersmom
    Quote Originally Posted by FayZ
    I made a quilt for my son and he said he wishes it was a little warmer. I think I used a poly batting. I was wondering if there is a warmer batt or should I double up? FayZ
    There is a batting out there called Thermore made by Hobbs. It is just about the same as the old Thinsulate batting that used to be sold. Very warm and lightweight. Just can't use fabric softener when its washed. I use it very frequently. It really comes in handy here in Buffalo in the winter!

    Also...I use it with anti-pill fleece for the backing. When I make quilts like this, people tell me its the only covering they need at night when its cold.
    Can you tell me why you can't use fabric softner, love the smell of April Fresh.

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by jmabby
    Quote Originally Posted by meemersmom
    Quote Originally Posted by FayZ
    I made a quilt for my son and he said he wishes it was a little warmer. I think I used a poly batting. I was wondering if there is a warmer batt or should I double up? FayZ
    There is a batting out there called Thermore made by Hobbs. It is just about the same as the old Thinsulate batting that used to be sold. Very warm and lightweight. Just can't use fabric softener when its washed. I use it very frequently. It really comes in handy here in Buffalo in the winter!

    Also...I use it with anti-pill fleece for the backing. When I make quilts like this, people tell me its the only covering they need at night when its cold.
    Can you tell me why you can't use fabric softner, love the smell of April Fresh.
    Just like with Thinsulate and down, warmth depends on the air in between as insulation. Fabric softener coats the fibers, and they don't "fluff up" as much, so less air, less insulation, and less warmth.
    Edited to add: I love the smell of Downy, too. To scent something, I put a little bit on a washcloth, get it wet, wring it out, and toss in the dryer for a couple of minutes with the dried quilt/garment. You get the scent, but it doesn't go through all layers, leaving the insulation intact.

  10. #10
    Super Member Vanuatu Jill's Avatar
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    I love W&N and get it at Joann's when it is either 50% off (plus use my 10% off card on top of that), or wait until I have a 50% off coupon. Makes it more affordable then. Since I use it mostly living here (I always used poly in the tropics), I bought a roll when it was 50% off and used my 10% - so a 60% savings warrented the whole roll. I still have enough left to make one more queen quilt-which I am next, so I better be on the watch for another 50% off sale!

  11. #11
    Power Poster Sadiemae's Avatar
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    My late Momma taught me to use little white vinegar instead of fabric softener.

  12. #12
    Power Poster PaperPrincess's Avatar
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    Wool is also a great batting. It's warm but breathes.

  13. #13
    Super Member QultingaddictUK's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by PaperPrincess
    Wool is also a great batting. It's warm but breathes.
    I tried some but it says not to wash it and I did, oops did not like it all, maybe I did something wrong, never tried it again.

  14. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by S D G
    We use warm and natural here in IN. It is very warm and light weight. IMO.
    Ditto!

  15. #15
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    I haven't made anything big with wool batting, but it should be warm. I personally have found that cotton feels cold on my hip. I have to put another blanket over my hip when I am using a quilt with a cotton batt vs. the all synthetic quilted throw I bought. I don't know why I feel it so much, but the cotton is like it is ventilted or something.

  16. #16
    Super Member dublb's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by QultingaddictUK
    Quote Originally Posted by PaperPrincess
    Wool is also a great batting. It's warm but breathes.
    I tried some but it says not to wash it and I did, oops did not like it all, maybe I did something wrong, never tried it again.
    I use the wool a lot. I wash & dry it the first time then after that I only wash it & I hang it up to dry. It has to be quilted with in 3 ". It is very warm, yet in the summer it seemed to be cooler. I prewash my fabric but not my batting; that gives me the puffy look that I like. I hope this helps.

  17. #17
    Super Member ptquilts's Avatar
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    I like having a thin quilt, in winter when you need more warmth, add a blanket under the quilt. Or two.

  18. #18
    Super Member MacThayer's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sadiemae
    My late Momma taught me to use little white vinegar instead of fabric softener.
    The reason your Momma taught you to use a little white vinegar is because it will take any excess soap out of the quilt (which attracts dirt) and also act to soften the fibers a bit, like a fabric softener, but not quite as much.

    The reason you should never use a fabric softener on any quilt is that it will attract dirt to the quilt, and you will have to wash it more often. Not good for quilts. (This information comes from a book on restoring Heirloom Quilts.)

    Also, my mother always used white vinegar on her quilts. I just never knew the reason why, except my Grandmother and Great Grandmother always did the same! So there's your folklore!

  19. #19
    Super Member dublb's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by MacThayer
    Quote Originally Posted by Sadiemae
    My late Momma taught me to use little white vinegar instead of fabric softener.
    The reason your Momma taught you to use a little white vinegar is because it will take any excess soap out of the quilt (which attracts dirt) and also act to soften the fibers a bit, like a fabric softener, but not quite as much.

    The reason you should never use a fabric softener on any quilt is that it will attract dirt to the quilt, and you will have to wash it more often. Not good for quilts. (This information comes from a book on restoring Heirloom Quilts.)

    Also, my mother always used white vinegar on her quilts. I just never knew the reason why, except my Grandmother and Great Grandmother always did the same! So there's your folklore!
    Thank's!

  20. #20
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    Can you use thinsolate as a batting?

  21. #21
    Power Poster Sadiemae's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by MacThayer
    Quote Originally Posted by Sadiemae
    My late Momma taught me to use little white vinegar instead of fabric softener.
    The reason your Momma taught you to use a little white vinegar is because it will take any excess soap out of the quilt (which attracts dirt) and also act to soften the fibers a bit, like a fabric softener, but not quite as much.

    The reason you should never use a fabric softener on any quilt is that it will attract dirt to the quilt, and you will have to wash it more often. Not good for quilts. (This information comes from a book on restoring Heirloom Quilts.)

    Also, my mother always used white vinegar on her quilts. I just never knew the reason why, except my Grandmother and Great Grandmother always did the same! So there's your folklore!
    Thanks, I always just did what my Momma told me. I never knew the reasoning behind it.

  22. #22
    Senior Member pineneedles4's Avatar
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    I recently purchased a wool batting but have not used it yet. It was at Hancock's and it's very soft. I've heard it's a dream to quilt with so I'm looking forward to using it in a quilt. I believe it's by Hobbs. It was sold by the yard and I used a 50% off coupon.

    Vanessa in Oklahoma
    www.pineneedles.wordpress.com

  23. #23
    Super Member aorlflood's Avatar
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    I'm not sure that quilts, in and of themselves, are supposed to be that warm. Originally, they were layered as the weather called for.

    That's what we still do to this day in our house. There are no blankets in this house, only quilts...and we layer them as needed to create the warmth or remove them as necessary as the weather warms up.

    You can tell him to add a blanket between the quilt and the top sheet. That would help.

  24. #24
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    Having been a member of this Board for almost a year now, I've learned that I'm a total outlier on this topic, but I still recommend using fleece as a batting if you want a really warm quilt.

    I made a quilt for my elderly mother when she just couldn't get warm last winter. She hates the feel of fleece, but it was the warmest fabric I could think of. So I pieced an all-cotton top and backing for the quilt, then used generic white fleece (purchased with a coupon) as the batting. I did simple SID quilting (fleece doesn't need much) and the result was a lovely WARM quilt that Mom really used.

  25. #25
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    I thank everyone for your help. I talked to my son a little while ago and he suggested I make him another one and he would layer them. I think he just wanted another quilt.smile.I was told not to use fleese because it stretches but one thing I've learned about quilters is Nothing stops a quilter from making what she wants. I will try your suggestions.

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