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Thread: an offer I hate to refuse

  1. #26
    Senior Member qwkslver's Avatar
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    That sounds like a real bargain. There is a video up on qnntv.com of Mary Fons and daughter talking about that. She laid it all out, cost of fabric, etc. and at $20 an hour labor arrived at a figure of $3,000 for a full sized quilt. I realize she is the queen of quilting but even at that I don't think $20 an hour is a lot for skilled labor. I don't quilt for people.

  2. #27
    Super Member jlm5419's Avatar
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    Wow! You are WAY faster than I am.
    Quote Originally Posted by ube quilting View Post
    I just made a queen size quillt for some one and the material alone was $110.00. It took me 14 hours to make the top, from washing fabric to finished top. Quilting will take another 8 hours and binding about 4 hours.

    I don't think a box of fabric, even great fabric, pays for the hours it takes to construct a quilt. The fabric would have to be worth about $300.00. That workes out to $12.00 per hour which is cheap.

    That is what I charged for this particular quilt.
    jlm5419-an Okie back in Oklahoma!
    http://according-to-ginger.blogspot.com/

  3. #28
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    I've never made a quilt for pay but lots of the quilts have to be shipped so I put the insurance at 3 times what my long arm quilter charges me. I figure that covers thread, fabric, backing and time.

  4. #29
    Super Member Scissor Queen's Avatar
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    I wouldn't have any problems at all refusing that offer. I don't need fabric desperately enough to work that hard for it.

  5. #30
    Super Member Scissor Queen's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by nancyw View Post
    I've never made a quilt for pay but lots of the quilts have to be shipped so I put the insurance at 3 times what my long arm quilter charges me. I figure that covers thread, fabric, backing and time.

    You can't insure your time. You'll also have to have receipts for everything else.

  6. #31
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    Call around to a large town near you and ask what they charge to LAQ the size you are going to do? As for the material make sure it is good quality that you can use and also cotton. Good luck

  7. #32
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    Quote Originally Posted by ube quilting View Post
    I just made a queen size quillt for some one and the material alone was $110.00. It took me 14 hours to make the top, from washing fabric to finished top. Quilting will take another 8 hours and binding about 4 hours.

    I don't think a box of fabric, even great fabric, pays for the hours it takes to construct a quilt. The fabric would have to be worth about $300.00. That workes out to $12.00 per hour which is cheap.

    That is what I charged for this particular quilt.
    This is a most sensible response and even so the quilt labor is VERY cheap. I would not do it for 12 an hour.

  8. #33
    Super Member Farm Quilter's Avatar
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    I have never made the pattern Jacob's Ladder, so I'm not sure of how labor-intensive it is, but I would sell an easily made and easily (boring E2E) quilted quilt for $500 with them providing all the material for the front, backing and batting. I would provide the thread just because I only work with quality thread, especially with the quilting part. So for me to trade my work for material, the material would have to be quilt shop high quality material and there would need to be at least 50 yards of material that I like and would use for it to be worth my while.

  9. #34
    Super Member #1piecemaker's Avatar
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    I'd want to see what I was getting too. I don't have any use for most fabrics except cottons. Anything other than that would be a total waste of my time. Ask her if you can take a look at the fabric to see if it is anything you can use. Trust me, I've gotten into those kinds of deals before too.
    A finished quilt excites me!! Whether is it mine or yours!

  10. #35
    Senior Member margie77072's Avatar
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    Thanks for all the info, ladies. The information on how to charge for quilts was much needed.

  11. #36
    Super Member SouthPStitches's Avatar
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    Swapping a decent amount of DECENT fabric that you like and would use seems reasonable and fair for your to make the top. For you to spend your time and efforts providing the quilting and binding, doesn't seem like equal trade.

  12. #37
    Super Member jcrow's Avatar
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    Is this person a friend? You never said. Do you like her? It would depend to me. If it was someone I really liked, I would do it just for the fabric for the quilt itself. The box of fabric would be a bonus, even if some of it wasn't what you'd use. I would be honored to make a quilt for a good friend if they asked me and if they had purchased all the fabric. I know a Jacob's Ladder is something I can make pretty well, so I would do it for her. But that's just me.
    "Be yourself...everyone else is taken."
    Strong people don't put others down...they build them up."
    "Remember that your instincts are more important than rules"

  13. #38
    Senior Member Gabrielle's Mimi's Avatar
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    Some one just donated a huge box of fabric to my LQS to be used/shared/donated. Everyone was so excited to see what was there. I took a look and realized that while most of it was cotton, some of it was very thin (aka "cheap") fabric, and most of it was really dated looking. I imagine some of it would be okay if you put some newer blenders with it, but there were no coordinating fabrics in the box. It was obviously stuff someone did not want. It was generous of her to share it, but my point is this: if what's in the box is no good to YOU, what's the point? You won't be gaining anything in this transaction. Maybe you could go through the box beforehand and select the fabric that you would actually be able to use.
    Create with joy in your heart!

  14. #39
    Super Member debbieoh's Avatar
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    I would check out the fabric and be sure its doesn't have a odor and is alot of good stuff

  15. #40
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    Personally, I don't take on these kinds of projects. I don't want to make my hobby work, be pressured for a deadline or forced to sew on fabrics I don't like. That is just me. If I make a quilt to give away (and I do give away most of mine), it is done with a pattern I pick out, fabrics I have chosen, and worked on when I wanted to. When finished, it is given away. I would just say politely that I don't take on projects like this because.....blah, blah, blah. and let it be that. If you can recommend someone who might want the job, do that. Or refer her to the local quilt guild for help.

  16. #41
    Senior Member captlynhall's Avatar
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    I can't imagine being able to charge enough for my time to produce a quilt. I certainly wouldn't do it for any trade out. She may not realize what is involved in making a quilt start to finish, but never the less, she would be getting the best of that bargain. I would respectfully decline.
    When a dying man asked his pastor "How long does it take to die?" his pastor's heartfelt reply was "A lifetime." Live life to the fullest, but stop now and then to enjoy the sunset.
    Lynda

  17. #42
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    i did a queen size quilt for a gentleman i worked with to give his wife for their aniversary i had $185 in the the quilt as i purchased all the fabric to his color specifacation and used the pattern he requested ( he looked thru some of my quiltbooks and picked out the pattern ) however i didnt charge him any labor except what the quilting cost as i dont
    quilt it myself i quilt by check as my dmil says ))). he was thrilled and so was she and sooo surprised too we managed to keep it a secret for 5 months. he was very patient as i work full time and my dmil was going thru chemo/radiation at the time and it took way longer than expected. i was really glad to see it go though lol i was kinda tired of it lol.
    carla m

  18. #43
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    after i saw the fabric and if it was something i liked and felt it was worth it i would make the quilt top only... since i dont quilt i would have to pay and it is 2 cents an inch here now... so then she would be on her own for that part of the quilt..

  19. #44
    Super Member carolaug's Avatar
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    I would do it for the fabric...I just enjoy making them...I have been offered many times to be paid. I think it takes the fun out of it....and this is my hobby...I don't want the stress. Only take it on if you feel you would enjoy it...and be sure to have her pay for the thread,batting and backing

  20. #45
    Super Member Caroline S's Avatar
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    Personally I would not take her up on the offer. If she really, really wanted a Jacobs Ladder quilt she would have made it herself. I don't think a large box of unknown fabric would be enough payment for your time.
    Sweet Caroline

  21. #46
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    follow your heart...BUT ask yourself ...is $12 an hour really CHEAP? NO, many people are doing much harder labor for $7.25 an hour BEFORE taxes...(and yes they are considered SKILLED at what they do)

    Do you LOVE to make quilts? Would your friend really be able to pay an outrage price like $600 for a quilt? DO you honestly feel she is taking advantage of your friendship....

    only YOU know what your true relationship is, and how it stands. Only YOU know what your time is really worth.

    Personally I have found that not one person has ever been willing to pay me to make a quilt even at $10 per hour and they supplied all the materials....IF I choose to make them a quilt it is usually for a $150 and they supply everything...which is why I don't do it...I don't have time to do my own stuff..hehehe

    lots of varied advise/opinions on this and like I said, only YOU can determine what will be done.

  22. #47
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    It doesn't sound worth it to me. It's going to have to be a really big box of fabric!

  23. #48
    Super Member Lyncat's Avatar
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    Is this person someone you care enough about to make them a quilt? Part of the process for me is thinking about the person while I'm making the quilt or dress, or curtain, or costume, or whatever it is. If it is someone I love, it's enjoyable. If not, I kind of feel resentful at times. Go with your heart. If you want to consider it a gift, go for it! Just take the fabric she gives you and if you don't want it, quietly give it away. Just my 2 cents worth.

  24. #49
    Super Member Doreen's Avatar
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    A queen size quilt is a lot of work and some beds take an oversize queen because of the mattress height. A box of fabric is not enough.

  25. #50
    Senior Member Michellesews's Avatar
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    When I construct a quilt from the ground up...I start at $500 for a twin, $750 for a full and $1000. for queen/king. I think a box of fabric is a poor trade for all your labor, expertise, time, etc. I have said it a thousand times....folks who have never made a quilt have no clue what is involved....and how would they? Best of luck to you in your decision, I hope you find happy ground for both of you.
    Michelle Guadarrama

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