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Thread: an offer I hate to refuse

  1. #1
    Super Member hikingquilter's Avatar
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    an offer I hate to refuse

    I have been offered a deal: A woman has asked me to make a full/queen size quilt for her. She has the fabric and has chosen a pattern - Jacob's Ladder. In exchange she has offered a large box of fabric. She collected fabric in the past and sewed some, but lost interest and now only knits. I made a Jacob's Ladder a couple of years ago for my DGS, Jacob, so I know what it will take. I've not seen the box of fabric yet, but would like to before I commit. My question is, what would you charge to make a quilt - labor only? I'd like to be able to judge whether the fabric is a good trade. I have never sold a quilt, only give them to family and a few close friends.

  2. #2
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    Would definately make sure you are getting good quality fabric and that it is worth your time and effort. Good luck.

  3. #3
    Power Poster BellaBoo's Avatar
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    I would certainly look at the fabric first. What is large and nice to her may be small and crappy to you. I don't quilt as a favor to others or to sell. The last person who asked me what I would charge to make a quilt for them I said 3 1/2 times the cost of new good quality fabric, pattern and thread that they pick out and brought to me with receipt.
    Got fabric?

  4. #4
    Super Member wolph33's Avatar
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    definitely see the fabric 1st.I worked with someone who said she would give me 5 large bags of fabric in exchange for a quilt.she brought the fabric-and it was worn out cut up clothes and very thin and very ugly-I gave it all back and said sorry-I can not use it.It was garbage fabric-and I am a fabric hoarder.
    http://www.etsy.com/shop/Upnorthcrafter

  5. #5
    Power Poster MadQuilter's Avatar
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    I could see an exchange for making a top but not for making a completed quilt.
    Martina
    Life, Liberty, and the Pursuit of Fabric!

  6. #6
    Super Member burchquilts's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by MadQuilter View Post
    I could see an exchange for making a top but not for making a completed quilt.
    I agree. Unless the fabric she brings you in all Liberty of London or spun gold...
    (`v)
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    (.(. (..`..♥ rebecca

  7. #7
    Senior Member kountrykreation's Avatar
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    I would do it, with, or without, the fabric exchange. HOWEVER, it would only be on my terms/timetable as in they supply ALL the materials and I would complete it when I could, which might be 6 days or 6 months. I like the process and have always given away my finished quilts, so at least the cost of fabric would be avoided.

  8. #8
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    Is she supplying the back, batt and thread or are you just doing the top? If she wants you to do the whole quilt then you will need to charge something for the things you will have to buy. I would look at the box of fabric before agreeing to it for payment. If it is a large box with lots of large Quilter's quality pieces of fabric, it may be adequate if your stash is low. If your stash has more fabric than you can possibly use in this lifetime, then work out payment plan instead.

  9. #9
    Super Member ube quilting's Avatar
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    I just made a queen size quillt for some one and the material alone was $110.00. It took me 14 hours to make the top, from washing fabric to finished top. Quilting will take another 8 hours and binding about 4 hours.

    I don't think a box of fabric, even great fabric, pays for the hours it takes to construct a quilt. The fabric would have to be worth about $300.00. That workes out to $12.00 per hour which is cheap.

    That is what I charged for this particular quilt.
    no act of kindness, no matter how small, is ever wasted. Aesop

  10. #10
    Power Poster PaperPrincess's Avatar
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    it would have to be a really, really, really big box.
    "I do not understand how anyone can live without one small place of enchantment to turn to."
    Marjorie Kinnan Rawlings

  11. #11
    Senior Member Hattie Frances's Avatar
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    This kind of arrangement seems like a friendship breaker. Non-Quilters really dont know what goes into making a quilt. I believe that's why so many of you give them away out of love. Their mouth usally drops open when you tell them what is a fair price for your hard labor of love. Good Luck in this venture.

  12. #12
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    I would look at the fabrics laying aside the quilt pieces I could use. No reason to accept the rest as part of your exchange. If she sewed and did not quilt she will probably have all kinds of fabrics other than quilting cottons. Before I got into quilting and only sewed I very seldom purchased cotton fabrics. My suggestion is to make an offer only on what you want to keep and tell her how much you charge for your work. Please consider that you are doing a speciality item with special skills and

  13. #13
    Senior Member jeank's Avatar
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    Let her sell her fabrics at a garage sale, pay you cash!
    Jean in MI

  14. #14
    Super Member Jan in VA's Avatar
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    I am currently making a log cabin queen/king quilt -- 36 blocks with three borders to replace one made in 1970s -- for a couple who hired me; they are an average couple with no quilt knowledge. I am charging them about $600. Just for fabric? No way.

    Jan in VA
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    peacefully colors my world.
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  15. #15
    Power Poster mighty's Avatar
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    I have to agree, just for fabric, no way. Unless of course it was a whole store full!!! LOL

  16. #16
    Junior Member Christine George's Avatar
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    I never tell anyone no. I just tell them that they're number _ in line and it'll be about a year. Then they can make their own decision.

  17. #17
    Power Poster Jingle's Avatar
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    Not a problem for me. I give my quilts to family and friends and to some that I think need a quilt.
    Another Phyllis
    This life is the only one you get - enjoy it before you lose it.

  18. #18
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    I'm making a memory quilt for a friend who doesn't sew. It will be about a year from start to finish because it gets worked in on my time schedule and around client quilting. I'm doing it out of love for her and am enjoying the work. But no way would I do this in trade for fabric.
    Cheryl Robinson
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    APQS Millenium Longarm with Intelliquilter

  19. #19
    Super Member Ruby the Quilter's Avatar
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    sounds like your friend either doesn't understand the time it takes to make a quilt or she is taking advantage of your friendship.
    Quilting in the Desert

  20. #20
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    I made 2 quilts for a friend. The first one I kind of designed and she bought all the fabric, batting and paid for the long arming (as I don't do that). I finished the top basically at a 3 day retreat (it was a simple pattern). It was queen size and materials were $117, plus batting and longarming which was $180, altogether probably close to $350. I also did a lap size for her, for her Father's Christmas present. It was all AirForce material, probably $!00 in material and batting, plus longarming, probably another $120. If I had charged her for my labor she certainly couldn't have afforded it. I really haven't made another quilt as a commissioner item, and probably won't ever again...but I enjoyed making those quilts and I know she appreciated what I did. If you want to do it.....do it, but a box of fabric really isn't worth it unless it's a ton and of great quality!!

  21. #21
    Super Member Latrinka's Avatar
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    I don't know. I hate when people ask me stuff like this, but agree with the others that you should definitely see the fabric, and work out the deal before committing to it.
    If a woman's work is never done....why start?

  22. #22
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    To be gracious you could ask to see the fabric - and let her know that you put so much time and effort into your quilting that you only sew with 100% cotton and you'd like to make sure she is happy with your quilting by taking along something you have made to show her your quality of work. Good luc- let us know how it works out.

    Happy Quilting !

  23. #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by BellaBoo View Post
    I would certainly look at the fabric first. What is large and nice to her may be small and crappy to you. . . . .
    Definitely see if what she has to offer is something that you want!

    I've learned that friends and relatives can be the worst people to 'do business' with.

  24. #24
    Member cosyjo's Avatar
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    It's so hard to please people and to work that hard for a box of fabric seems a bit more give than get. I just wouldn't do it. Unless there was an exchange of money also. Or some kind of renumeration.

  25. #25
    Junior Member Raine's Avatar
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    Is it my understanding that this lady has quilted before? Unless you really want to do it for her go ahead. Personally the time and energy it takes to make a quilt, even with her supplying all the materials, a box of fabric along is not worth it. Who is going to quilt it when you complete it? I am with Cosyjo, exchange of money then I could buy my own fabric.
    Believe, it can be done!

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