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Thread: Prices for finished quilts ...

  1. #1
    Senior Member w7sue's Avatar
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    Prices for finished quilts ...

    My sister-in-law has invited me to meet with her and a friend. Her friend is opening up a small store in an antique district in Portland, Oregon. They both think they would like to have my quilts in the store. I have an email prepared for Mindy with pictures of some of my recent quilts. I have a HUGE stack of quilts without homes that are just sitting in a closet - I might as well sell them so I can make more. I don't have any records of how much I have spent - the only costs I have would be for the long arm quilting on most of them. I have my own long arm now so I don't have to pay someone else for that part anymore. I saw an article someplace with a formula (of sorts) and can't find it. Mindy will want 20% for selling the quilts. I don't even know where to begin for pricing quilts. HELP!!!

  2. #2
    Super Member ptquilts's Avatar
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    All I can say is, you are very lucky she only wants 20% commission. That is quite low. Pick out a few that you are not attached to and see how they do. If they sell quickly, maybe your price is too low.

    Only you can say what a fair price would be. Look at it this way - if someone gave you $1000 you would be ecstatic. If you found out one sold for $5 you would be miserable. Keep working in from both ends.

  3. #3
    Super Member mermaid's Avatar
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    Start with the cost of the quilting. Add $100 for fabric & thread. Add another $100 for your labor. Total and add another 20% of that. Now stand back and consider if you have priced your labor and fabric too low. Have another go at it. People mostly buy because they can't make it themselves. You are selling your talent. I would start with a higher price, and then come down if it looks like they're priced too high. With this information, you can put a ''sale'' tag on top of the original price tag. How 'bout this formula?

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    Super Member Candace's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by mermaid View Post
    Start with the cost of the quilting. Add $100 for fabric & thread. Add another $100 for your labor. Total and add another 20% of that. Now stand back and consider if you have priced your labor and fabric too low. Have another go at it. People mostly buy because they can't make it themselves. You are selling your talent. I would start with a higher price, and then come down if it looks like they're priced too high. With this information, you can put a ''sale'' tag on top of the original price tag. How 'bout this formula?
    I spend much more than $100 for fabric, batting and thread on my quilts, and my labor is sure worth more than $100.
    Last edited by Candace; 08-19-2013 at 12:01 PM.

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    What do you do if your quilts are already labeled?

  6. #6
    Super Member Candace's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Misty's Mom View Post
    What do you do if your quilts are already labeled?
    Aren't paintings and art work in general, signed? I would see a label as a necessity.

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    I found an article by Cindy Roth of Longarm University (longarmuniversity.com) for pricing a commission quilt. It seems high for my area, but it provides a starting point.
    Even though you have your own long arm quilter now, you should think about the cost of the machine.
    Good luck!

  8. #8
    Super Member mermaid's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Candace View Post
    I spend much more than $100 for fabric, batting and thread on my quilts, and my labor is sure worth more than $100.
    . Exactly my point...to start with figures and step back to evaluate. It then becomes a more realistic view of what your project is worth to you or to someone else...I did not mention batting cost because many LArm quilters prefer to use their favorite and it becomes part of your contracted cost.

  9. #9
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    I would start with the replacement cost of the fabric, batting, and thread at full retail value.

  10. #10
    Super Member ghostrider's Avatar
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    Check out the quilts on Etsy, find some similar to yours and see what their prices are. At least you'll get a very general idea of what others are asking (key word is asking). The price range on Etsy goes from sublime to ridiculous.
    http://www.etsy.com/listing-category...elevant&page=0

    Some people triple the cost of materials, but that doesn't take the complexity of the design or techniques used into consideration at all. That may be the 'formula' you were thinking of.

    As an aside, I hope your SIL is charging a more realistic commission percentage to non-relative consignment sellers. You are getting a VERY good deal at 20%.
    The Earth without art is just "Eh".

  11. #11
    Power Poster ckcowl's Avatar
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    another place to look is the 'QuiltsForSale.ca web site- browse through the quilts, compare yours to the same style someone else is offering. you need to *guess-estimate* the amount of fabric, batting, thread, patterns,- then think about the time involved- how much is your time worth? even though you have a long-arm you still need to include the cost of quilting in the price of the quilt- it does not matter if you do the quilting or if someone else does it- it is a process that needs to be added into the price...you can choose to add the amount it would be if you were paying someone else or you can determine what your prices would be if you were quilting for someone else- either way- it needs to be added in. and if you price your quilts high & they do not sell you can *have a sale* and deduct some- sale items sometimes sell better- just because they are 'on sale' ; remember to add your consignment fee to the cost- so when that comes off the top you still make what you need to make.
    hiding away in my stash where i'm warm, safe and happy

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    Super Member RainyBC's Avatar
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    I read (somewhere?) that you should take your cost and triple it. I don't know if that's fair or not, but I think if your quilts are of good quality which I'm sure they are they should not go cheap. I purchased a hand quilted quilt made by the Amish ladies over 25 years ago and paid $300.00 at that time. I'm quite sure the same quilt today would cost at least $1,000.00.

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    I think you also need to consider the type of store this will be. A high end store can carry the kinds of prices being talked about here. However, if the store is mid-market, pricing a quilt in the high hundreds might have no takers and you are wasting your time. Remember if the quilts don't sell quickly they have to be re-folded fairly often and cleaned.

  14. #14
    Super Member Lori S's Avatar
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    When pricing my goods , I often ask myself "would I make it again for the same price"? The market for quilts varies widely, but in the end you need to be happy with your compensation.

  15. #15
    Power Poster dunster's Avatar
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    If someone were to ask me to make a quilt, I would price it by cost of materials plus time. However, if someone wanted to buy one of my quilts that are already made, I would look at it differently. Suppose someone offered $500 for an already-made quilt, and I knew that I had worked on it for 100 hours and spent $200 on the supplies. I would only be making $300 for the 100 hours, not a very good wage at all. But then I would ask myself, would I rather have the $500 or that particular quilt? The answer might be that I'm not all that attached to the quilt, and the joy was in making it, not keeping it. That $500 might go toward the cost of more fabric, or patterns, or sewing machines, or it might help out in a more practical way. So the quilt that cost $200 to make might even go out the door for $100 if I would rather have the money than the quilt.

  16. #16
    Super Member Daylesewblessed's Avatar
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    One suggestion that I have is to have a written agreement as to how the arrangement will work. I would want to be assured that the store has insurance and would reimburse me in the case of fire, other damage, or theft. I would also want to be sure that the quilts would not be displayed in sunlight or other adverse conditions.

    Best of luck with the venture!

    Dayle

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    To dmnorden, I see you are fairly new to the Board, so I just want to say Hey,Neighbor!, and Welcome. I'm from about 20 miles west of you. My next door neighbor has the same last name as yours

    To w7sue, As for the pricing for the quilts, the LA'er that I use never charges less than $200 to quilt for me. I never count the cost of the material, because I never know what I bought or what I got from friends and relatives. I do know that I have seen quilts selling for several thousand dollars, and I have bought quilts myself for as little as $40.
    I would say, start higher and go down if you need to. That would be a LOT easier than starting low, and then having to raise the price later. I guess it really depends on how badly you want to get rid of all the extra quilts you have.

  18. #18
    Super Member GrannieAnnie's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Candace View Post
    I spend much more than $100 for fabric, batting and thread on my quilts, and my labor is sure worth more than $100.
    I often use reclaimed or inherited fabrics, but still that $100 formula seems terribly low for a good sized quilt.
    Remember, $100 is barely a day at minimum wage.
    Bad Spellers of the World
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  19. #19
    Super Member GrannieAnnie's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by RainyBC View Post
    I read (somewhere?) that you should take your cost and triple it. I don't know if that's fair or not, but I think if your quilts are of good quality which I'm sure they are they should not go cheap. I purchased a hand quilted quilt made by the Amish ladies over 25 years ago and paid $300.00 at that time. I'm quite sure the same quilt today would cost at least $1,000.00.
    Lousy formula IMO! I shop for bargins, inherite stuff, reclaim fabric and often don't spend much on anything. I'm making a rag quilt for a guy at church from inherited and donated fabric. Now, I know math, $1.89 for thread tripled won't buy lunch at McDucks. I'm not selling the quilt, but if I were, it would be a heck of a bunch more than triple my expenses.

    When I knitted a lot, I'd never use that formula either. I can make a beautiful sweater or afaghan for $10------------and hours and hours of labor. But it would be a cold day you know where before I'd sell it for $30.
    Bad Spellers of the World
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    Hi,
    I have a small shop in a tourist area, and I hate to say, but quilts didn't sell that much. My mentor is a beautiful artist with her quilts, and she is only asking $225 or so, and they have sat around, even when I switch them out, so they always look new. If you are charging what they are really worth, then they really won't sell. Now, it may just be my area, this is not a wealthy tourist area, like the coasts might be. I think if my shop were in the Hamptons or the Jersey shore, they would sell much better.

    Also, I always look on etsy for pricing, and there is a woman there who sells a quilt a day. Her shop name is quilt lover, and her quilts are easy to make, very quick. She gets a couple of hundred dollars for a full quilt. Not worth it, in my view.

    I hope that I am being a naysayer, and that your quilts do very well. They are beautiful!! If it doesn't work out, or even as a marketing strategy, you may want to consider donating a quilt once in a while - your will do good for a cause, it is a tax write off, your unused quilts will get a good home, and it is a great way to get your name, and the shop's name, out in the public.
    Best,
    Nancy
    Nancy Lee

  21. #21
    Gay
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    Senior Member Gay's Avatar
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    Just posted this on another thread. One lady quilter charges around $240 per sq ft for commissioned quilts, patchwork or hand embroidered, depending on the complexity of design. I don't know if that includes the fabric, but does include quilting. She seems to get enough work. I know of one machine embroidered quilt sold for $60,000 and another for $20,000. Makes the head spin, eh.

    Price will depend on how badly you need to sell yours, as not everyone appreciates the time spent making them, and the cost of fabrics. I tell the tight-fisted, if they want to pay peanuts, then get monkeys to make it.

  22. #22
    Power Poster twinkie's Avatar
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    Prices may be much higher in outer space than where W7Sue lives. I think that has a lot to do with it. Many times you cannot sell a quilt in my area for $300 but I have seen them in Hershey and York, Pa with a $1,000 price tag on them. What makes selling quilts difficult is the Chinese "knockoffs" that sell in retail stores for $150 and less. You try to talk about quality to some people and they just can't grasp it. One good thing is the outlet. Most people who are shopping for antiques are used to paying higher prices for their merchandise. Good Luck

    QUOTE=Candace;6243699]I spend much more than $100 for fabric, batting and thread on my quilts, and my labor is sure worth more than $100.[/QUOTE]

  23. #23
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    It depends on the area you are trying to sell them in. I have noticed that prices are all over the place. I have seen beautiful Amish made quilts in NY for under $400.00. I would not do all that work for that price...Good Luck...

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    I have never sold my quilts, but I use to sell crafts. No one ever gets the worth of their labor out of hand crafted item. You know that your time put into an item is priceless. In crafts they use to say double what it cost for you to make it and that was how you priced your items. Hope this helps. I figure handmade quilts are priceless.

  25. #25
    Junior Member Froggiey's Avatar
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    A "friend" texted me the other day and asked if I had a quilt I would sell her for $100-150 so she could give it to her daughter for her birthday the next week. Wouldn't that be great! People don't even know how much money and time is spent on making a quilt. $100 would not pay for the material and add quilting to that usually makes a quilt cost around $300 just to make. I just told her I didn't have any made (which was the truth. ) I think it takes a lot of gall to ask someone to spend hours making a quilt and offer to buy it for $100. People see "quilts" for sale at department stores for $39 and assume they are one in the same, which they are not. Good luck, but please make it worth your time.

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