Welcome to the Quilting Board!

Already a member? Login above
loginabove
OR
To post questions, help other quilters and reduce advertising (like the one on your left), join our quilting community. It's free!

Page 1 of 2 1 2 LastLast
Results 1 to 25 of 46

Thread: Purchase a pattern or make it on my own?

  1. #1
    Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Location
    Pikeville, KY
    Posts
    20

    Purchase a pattern or make it on my own?

    I have seen several things lately that I would like to make. Most of these items have a pattern for sale for you to use. My question is, is it ok to make a similar item if I can make it on my own without purchasing the pattern?
    I wouldn't be selling the items, just for personal use but I wouldn't want to take away from the pattern designer. What is your opinion?

    Thanks
    Kim

  2. #2
    Super Member feline fanatic's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2009
    Location
    NY
    Posts
    8,819
    I draft my own patterns all the time based on pictures alone. I say if you can figure out on your own how to do it without a pattern there is no reason to buy the pattern.

  3. #3
    Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2012
    Location
    Beachville, Ontario. Canada
    Posts
    19
    I draft my own patterns from things I see online or in a shop. I don't think it is necessary to purchase patterns. They really are expensive (for most of them) and I would rather put the money into fabric. (Iam on a low fixed income.) Alot of the time my drafts are just a tad different but close enough to satisfy me.
    Dena

  4. #4
    Senior Member tngal22's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2011
    Posts
    693
    I am with the above poster. I try to do it from pictures but if I can't or it seems too complex, then I will buy a pattern.
    Sabrina
    Mommy to a 6 year old little girl, 3 dogs, 5 cats, and 2 fish. lol Life keeps me busy but when I have a moment, I love to sew
    http://ataleofamilitaryfamily.blogspot.com/
    http://www.etsy.com/shop/HugsLove

  5. #5
    Super Member Pat625's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2012
    Location
    North Pole
    Posts
    1,641
    I get ideas from pictures, but always end up changing at least something in it...I am on disability, and if I had to buy patterns I wouldn't be able to quilt..There are also so many free patterns to choose from on the internet

  6. #6
    Senior Member Sew N Tune's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Location
    Shenandoah Valley, Virginia
    Posts
    619
    I too, draft my own designs if not too complex. Why pay for the pattern. Download a free piece of graph paper, and go for it.
    The one who dies with the most fabric wins.

  7. #7
    Senior Member qwkslver's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2010
    Location
    WV
    Posts
    584
    qnntv.com has a free video on that, it's Mary Fons.

  8. #8
    Super Member dmyers's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2010
    Location
    central, ca
    Posts
    1,191
    I can usually draft my own pattern from a quilt that is shared on a blog or pattern for sale. But I buy the pattern anyways to give the person credit for their work and I guess sharing their idea.

  9. #9
    Super Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Location
    New Mexico
    Posts
    1,587
    Welll I guess there's lots of us "drafting." I look at pic of quilts, see if I can identify the blocks that make it and go from there. Sometimes I can figure it out but if not...on to the next quilt. I buy books ONLY if there are at least three quilts I want to do otherwise books are just eye candy.

    Also...looking at finished quiltis is a great TEST to check my color combos. Sometimes my brain has a short circuit and colors that I think will look good together with a swatch test is just not right. I'm doing that w/fab for bargello...now I just may have to buy a kit for that.
    If you don't work on it you'll never finish it.

  10. #10
    Super Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    Location
    DC metro area
    Posts
    1,250
    I try to buy patterns when I have the money just to support the designers that I like. But most of the time, I try to fiugre it out myself if I can.

  11. #11
    Super Member quiltsRfun's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Location
    Utah
    Posts
    8,051
    Blog Entries
    1
    I draft patterns from pictures. As Pat625 said, mine are usually just a bit different. When someone asks I refer them to the designer's pattern.

  12. #12
    Super Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2012
    Location
    The Colony, TX
    Posts
    3,364
    If you can identify the block and put your measurements to it and create a quilt I don't think that is an issue. Most of the blocks they are using are not copyrighted, what is copyrighted are their directions. Myself I usually (unless it is super simple) buy a pattern as I don't have the extra time and it actually works out cheaper for me. Personally I can't figure out why anyone (except maybe a true newbie) would buy a pattern for a rail fence/turning twenty/standard log cabin, etc.

  13. #13
    Super Member Scissor Queen's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2009
    Location
    Southwest Kansas
    Posts
    4,829
    You are under no obligation to purchase any pattern for anything. If you can copy a design and figure it out on your own, you are free to do so.

  14. #14
    Super Member crafterrn1's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
    Location
    Connecticut
    Posts
    1,116
    Okay as a designer here is my take on this subject. I feel if you are making a pattern that has blocks in the common domain then you can draft any pattern you desire. The written words of my pattern are copyrighted. Some big designers have copyrights or patents on some of their blocks. That is cleary stated. I have and do morph many patterns I see for my own use. But many many many patterns are in the common domain! I am not sure that someone that wrote a pattern for a Log Cabin quilt can be upset if you design your own. That pattern dates back to the mid 1800's. But if you decided to sell the pattern and copied my directions word ofr word I may be upset. But reallly just how many ways can you make a log cabin block. Really! So go forward and enjoy!
    Live Love and Laugh Enough!

  15. #15
    Member kd7kyo's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2012
    Posts
    68
    Blog Entries
    3
    What quilting software do you use to design your own pattern or "mirror" another pattern. I am looking at either free or purchase.

  16. #16
    Moderator QuiltnNan's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Location
    western NY formerly MN, FL, NC, SC
    Posts
    42,805
    Blog Entries
    45
    Quote Originally Posted by qwkslver View Post
    qnntv.com has a free video on that, it's Mary Fons.
    here is a link to the video http://www.qnntv.com/videos/1075_qui...marianne-fons/

    they state that if you can look at a quilt and draft it yourself... go for it.
    Nancy in western NY
    before you speak THINK
    T is it True? H is it Helpful? I is it Inspiring? N is it Necessary? K is it Kind?


  17. #17
    Super Member crafty pat's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2010
    Location
    Live Oak, Texas
    Posts
    5,730
    I don't use software , I just use my ruler and paper and draw them out myself. I would never sell someone else's design or give it to anyone else.

  18. #18
    Super Member Scissor Queen's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2009
    Location
    Southwest Kansas
    Posts
    4,829
    Quote Originally Posted by kd7kyo View Post
    What quilting software do you use to design your own pattern or "mirror" another pattern. I am looking at either free or purchase.
    Pencil, paper and a calculator.

  19. #19
    Power Poster joyce888's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Location
    Georgia
    Posts
    10,642
    Blog Entries
    1
    Almost every pattern out there starts with a basic design and is built on or tweaked by the designer. That's what you would be doing. To me patterns are for designs that I don't want to take the time and figure it out myself and would rather just buy the pattern and be done with it.
    Joyce

    Four things you can't recover: The stone.....after the throw. The word......after its said. The occasion.....after its missed. The time......after its gone

  20. #20
    Senior Member Rubesgirl's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2012
    Location
    Tidewater Virginia
    Posts
    835
    If I'm taking a class, I'll buy the pattern; otherwise I try to figure it out for myself. I'm not always successful, but I have friends at my LQS who will give me advice if I get in a bind. I am very grateful to them! There are also so many free patterns available online, I try to use them. So many of the patterns you have to purchase to make are beyond my skill level that I would not attempt them, anyway.
    Wendy in VA

    If I had a dollar for every time I got distracted I wish I had some ice cream.

  21. #21
    Super Member Fraew's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2011
    Location
    Clayton, CA
    Posts
    1,990
    Blog Entries
    3
    I draft almost everything with paper/pencil and or EQ6. I usually want to alter the things that inspire me. However, I purchase books, magazines and patterns (when I can) to support those that provide the "inspiration".

    I quilt for me (not selling anything) and I enjoy the process of figuring it out myself but you better believe that I will buy it if it is complex.
    Fraew

    "I don't buy vintage quilts. By the time I finish the quilts I've started they've already become antiques." ~ Mark Lipinski
    Link to my albums: http://www.quiltingboard.com/members...85-albums.html

  22. #22
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Posts
    220
    One of the things that worries me nowadays is the fear I hear among us, fear that we will be accused of something terrible if someone thinks we have taken inspiration from somewhere and, especially, if we want to sell the work of our hands.

    I am a pattern designer in another domain of folk art - because patchwork and quilting ARE centuries-old forms of folk art - and if you buy one of my patterns, what is it that you are buying? A set of instructions for a combination of folk elements that I have put together. I didn't say 'that I invented' because I didn't invent the elements. I only put them together in what I hope is a pleasing combination and wrote instructions so that other people could do it too. If someone wants to re-create my combination without using my instructions, they obviously can do it. If someone decides to make one of my 'designs' (combinations) and does, and then uses it as the panel of an object that they sell, I think that is wonderful. Why? because I know how many hours and how much care they will have taken to do it, and if they can get a decent price for their work, good for them. I honestly hope they do. Plus, what RIGHT would I have to try to stop them or even to hint that they couldn't/shouldn't/oughtn't ? None whatsoever. Period. The only thing I can ask them to do is not copy my instructions and sell them.

    I know for certain that the women who use these folk elements in their daily lives learned how to do it by copying the elements from their mothers, grandmothers, neighbours, etc.

    When new elements arrive, it is always surprising for historians (which is what I actually am) to follow the trail to where the new elements came from. A cool example: around 1870, embroiderers in the Jerusalem area started to introduce what have now become named as 'flower pots' into their work. Now, none of the Bedouins around Jerusalem used flower pots around their tents. So where did the flower pots come from? We discovered that around that time a group of Quakers arrived and set up a school for women in Ramallah, which is a few miles from Jerusalem. These missionaries must have brought chintz fabric with them on their furniture or... Flower pots on chintz are typical of the European style of fabric design around that time and these designs originated in fact in the formal English and French topiary gardens inspired by Indian rajahs' palace gardens... So by sight and copying, a garden in India turned into a 'flower pot' cross stitch design on a Bedouin woman's dress. Thank goodness no one at that time would have even thought of claiming originality, invention or the dreaded 'copyright' word!

    A quilt 'pattern' is a set of written instructions enabling someone to re-create a given combination of traditional elements. If you see a picture of a quilt, or a quilt at somebody's house or in a museum or where ever, and you say to yourself "Oh, that's cool. It looks like 6 rows of square-in-squares, set on point, separated by narrow sashing" and you can then draft your understanding, and make a similar combination, it means you didn't need a pattern. You had the willpower, the technique and the time to do something similar. You are doing exactly the same thing as people have been doing over the centuries. And if this helps to support your family, all power to you.

    You are following Proverbs 31: 10-31.

    I believe that we 'designers' can be proud of our combinations, and of our role in preserving tradition while keeping our craft relevant, attractive and alive. But we need to realize that we have not 'invented' anything, probably. I have seen what the Western world calls 'log cabins' on saddle bags made by nomads 150 years ago in far eastern Siberia. Go to Xian or Chengdu for the most incredible baby quilts, made of what we call "squares-in-squares'. The hill people of northern Thailand have developed amazingly tiny rows of 'prairie points' in their strip-pieced work.

    Yes, by all means buy patterns, if you want. Draft your own, if you want. Sell your work, or keep it, or give it away, why not?

    Inspiration can come from all over, from everywhere. Enjoy it!
    Maggie in Jerusalem
    http://www.etsy.com/shop/maggiemwdesigns

  23. #23
    Super Member JNCT14's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2010
    Location
    CT New Haven County
    Posts
    1,495
    There were a LOT of threads on this subject concerning copyright, etc. I think the concensus was that you can draft the pattern IF you do not sell the finished piece, and as long as you acknowledge the pattern and designer on the back.

  24. #24
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Posts
    220
    Quote Originally Posted by JNCT14 View Post
    There were a LOT of threads on this subject concerning copyright, etc. I think the concensus was that you can draft the pattern IF you do not sell the finished piece, and as long as you acknowledge the pattern and designer on the back.
    Sorry, and not looking to create hostility, but the whole point of my very long-winded post was that you the craftsman works out how to do something, you then do it and it is yours to do with as you wish. You can use your production for yourself, you can give it away, you can exchange it for something else, you can sell it.

    Fear and misinformation are causing havoc now in a way that they most likely never have over the whole history of working with woven fabric.

    The thing you cannot do is take the actual instructions for a 'pattern' or technique as written and copy them for distribution.

    Feel free to work out a combination of shapes and then do with it as you see fit.
    Maggie in Jerusalem
    http://www.etsy.com/shop/maggiemwdesigns

  25. #25
    Power Poster PaperPrincess's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
    Location
    Michigan
    Posts
    10,464
    Blog Entries
    2
    I draft lots of patterns for single blocks, often to make it easier for me to construct. I'm flying geese challenged, also, there are those trapeziods that crop up in some blocks, which I can't cut. We're not even going to talk about set in seams. I redraft and use HSTs instead. Yes there are extra seams, but you get the same general effect. I don't sell or show my quilts, and if I want to duplicate an entire quilt, I buy the pattern.
    Last edited by PaperPrincess; 06-16-2012 at 05:51 AM. Reason: never see typos until it's posted!!!
    "I do not understand how anyone can live without one small place of enchantment to turn to."
    Marjorie Kinnan Rawlings

Page 1 of 2 1 2 LastLast

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

SEO by vBSEO ©2011, Crawlability, Inc.