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Thread: QAYG problem

  1. #1
    Super Member barri1's Avatar
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    QAYG problem

    Help!!!!!..
    I'm not sure how to solve the problem, and I'm sure there are a couple of talented, and brainy quilters that might be able to help me..
    I am making four of the same quilts for my staff. I decided to do QAYG, as I have never FMQ a big quilt, and thought it would be easier to handle.. Now I have 28 23(?) X 23(?) squares that have to be attached into four quilts.. I thought I followed the directions on my quilt, and the sashing down was very wonky.. I also didn't like the instability in the lines. I didn't square up the squares. I think that might help the problem. Then of course I came up with a problem with that.. Each of the squares is made up of 16 6" squares. I'm thinking if I square it up, I have to go around the quilt, and take off a little from each side, or the squares will look uneven? After I do that, I'm thinking I should sew the squares together with a whip stitch, and then put the sashing on top, and back, and sew it down.
    If anyone has any ideas, I would greatly appreciate whatever help you can give me.
    I know this is long winded, but I didn't think I would get into this much trouble..
    Thanks,
    Barri

  2. #2
    Senior Member Patti25314's Avatar
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    If I understand this, you did 4x4 of the 6" which should give you 23.25" if you used .25" seams, right? I think I would have squared up after each set of 2x2, but I'm sure it's too much work to take that apart. If you square up the ones you've got now, will they look right? If so, then yes, you can put them together and sew a sashing on top front and back. Another idea might be to try to make them wonky - if you have a lot of sashing material. You might need to add a few pieces if you do it this way. Hope this helps. Also, try sewing sashing on one direction and then the other.

  3. #3
    Super Member barri1's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Patti25314 View Post
    If I understand this, you did 4x4 of the 6" which should give you 23.25" if you used .25" seams, right? I think I would have squared up after each set of 2x2, but I'm sure it's too much work to take that apart. If you square up the ones you've got now, will they look right? If so, then yes, you can put them together and sew a sashing on top front and back. Another idea might be to try to make them wonky - if you have a lot of sashing material. You might need to add a few pieces if you do it this way. Hope this helps. Also, try sewing sashing on one direction and then the other.
    The squares were 6.5" sewn 4 across x 4 down. Which would be 24 X24. Then they were sandwiched, and FMQ. I now measured the squares after FMQ, and they are about 23.5" but not accurate. I am trying to figure out how to trim them so they look even, and not that I took too much from any one side..
    Thanks..

  4. #4
    Super Member Pinkiris's Avatar
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    Barri1, I don't have a solution to your problem, but I'm wondering how long the dog in your avatar has been smoking? LOL!
    Sue

  5. #5
    Super Member Teddybear Lady's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Pinkiris View Post
    Barri1, I don't have a solution to your problem, but I'm wondering how long the dog in your avatar has been smoking? LOL!

    Haha, every time I see this picture of your dog I think he's smoking too! As for your quilt question, I don't have a clue, sorry.

  6. #6
    Super Member barri1's Avatar
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    Socrates is a 7yo cockapoo. He has been walking around the house for close to seven years with a chewy in his mouth. He takes them to bed and sleeps with one.. He doesn't chew them. Sort of like a pacifier. I could change pictures to him in his leather biker vest, or Halloween when I wrapped him in bandages.. I could see the animal lovers calling the animal protection on me.. I was using a figure of speech when I mentioned that he would get dropped kicked if he didn't cut out what he was doing.. Too many on the board took it seriously, and were ready to come after me.. He is an extremely pampered, and loved little fellow.. We are talking about having his own dog house under my desk so his little tush wouldn't get cold.. and he can hang out with his mom..

  7. #7
    Super Member Daylesewblessed's Avatar
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    I am sorry you are having trouble with QAYG. It is a technique that I use a lot. Trimming is very important, because there isn't much slack with a block that has been quilted. The edges need to be the same length, since only limited easing is possible. Equally important is that the edges be straight, because you are butting two blocks together. After quilting the block, I trim it to the desired size and then run a machine stitch around the edge. Sometimes a little bit of micro-trimming is needed at the corners after that. Then things should fit together nicely. I would recommend that you do any squaring that you can at this point.

    Your idea of whipstitching the blocks together at this point and then applying the sashing might work for you and allow you to cover a crooked seam with the sashing, but I would never be able to get the top and bottom sashing to match up without basting the layers together. That is easier said than done, because your squares are quite large (hard to reach in that far to the seam while managing all of the bulk).

    Good luck with the projects and let us know how it works out.

    Dayle

  8. #8
    Super Member barri1's Avatar
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    Thanks Dayle..
    I was really getting down in the dumps over it.. I think I will spend today evening out all of my squares for my quilt, and put it together. If it works, I will go on to the rest of them.
    Barri

  9. #9
    Super Member Daylesewblessed's Avatar
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    I think that you will be pleased will how things fit once your blocks are trimmed. With 6" squares used in the blocks, even if you have to trim off a little bit here and there, it won't be so noticeable within the block. If the original squares used to make the block had been small, then trimming might have left the edge rows looking too narrow.

    I have used Elmer's school glue on bindings before, and maybe it would work to use it to baste the sashings down if you do the whipstitch method for attaching the blocks.

    Dayle

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    Super Member jcrow's Avatar
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    I don't understand how you put sashing on after you whip stitch the pieces together. I thought the sashing was to attach the pieces together. How do you attach the sashing without the seams showing? Just wondering. I would like to do a QAYG and would like to find out how to do this before I attempt it.
    "Be yourself...everyone else is taken."
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    "Remember that your instincts are more important than rules"

  11. #11
    Super Member barri1's Avatar
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    Jcrow,
    I thought it would go together smoothly after I read, and watched a bunch of tutorials.. I was banking on it working, as I have three more to do after.
    I need to give a major tahnk you to Dayle, as she gave me the courage to start. I'm pretty big on procrastination when I am unsure.
    Barri

  12. #12
    Super Member Daylesewblessed's Avatar
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    I must clarify that normally the sewing of the sashing is done through the layers of the block as a means of attaching the blocks together. There are different ways to do QAYG, and I basically use this one: http://welshquilter.blogspot.com/200...as-you-go.html, but using closer to a 1 and 1/8" width on the top sashing rather than their recommended 1".

    Since Barri was going to try whipstitching the blocks together, the sashing would need to be applied on top (and on the bottom side of the quilt) in order to cover the whipstitching seam. Picture something like bias tape being laid over the seam and sewn down. The sashing would have to be pressed so that the raw edges were turned under.

    I am remembering the first time I used the QAYG method. The trimming and squaring was not my problem, but I did have to experiment just a little to get the width of the sashing and my seam allowances just right. It all had to to with the thickness of things and the size of my quarter inch seam. Since then I have been using a quarter inch foot, and the finished width of my sashing is much more uniform.

    The second challenge for me was lining up the intersections. I now hand baste at the intersection for about 1-2" when applying the last sashing step. It prevents movement and slippage forward of the top layers. The workspace is tight on that step, and my walking foot might help the slippage, but it is just too cumbersome and wide for ease of use there.

    I am really pleased with the QAYG technique. My avatar quilt was done that way and so was my Lucky Stars quilt:
    http://www.quiltingboard.com/picture...d-t194849.html. I have done about 8 of them in various sizes.

    Maybe someday I will master handling the bulk of machine quilting, but until then, I am happy to have found the QAYG method.

    Dayle
    Last edited by Daylesewblessed; 10-21-2012 at 12:14 PM.

  13. #13
    Swap Hosts Krystyna's Avatar
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    Bari, QAYG is always an adventure -- at least for me. You absolutely have to trim your blocks. I've found it is necessary to baste my sandwich because no matter how well I pin, the backing always seems to go traveling. The method I've used is having the backing as sashing by folding it under. You do end up with a double sashing, but that's life. Sometimes using different backings can result in a more interesting look. Wishing you lots of luck!
    Krystyna
    Feel the fear and do it anyway!

  14. #14
    Senior Member Patti25314's Avatar
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    I thought about you a lot today and wondered how it is going! I think if you divide the blocks into piles according to size for the three (or four???) quilts, then square them up to one size -- taking off the least that you have to, and then putting them together in some way that will hold them. I thought your "whipping" was going to be like a basting stitch that probably wouldn't be removed. Then I would take my 4 x 7 big block and lay it down so I could see how wide the sashing needed to be to make it cover those edges. I hope this helps. No matter, remember they will be loved.

  15. #15
    Super Member barri1's Avatar
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    Hi Dayle,
    I did it sort of the way Welshquilter showed, but I think there was a problem because the blocks were wonky. I could try it again, and it might work, but I think I like sewing the squares together, and then sewing the sashing on top. I will still have the satbility of both the squares sewn together, and the sashing gong through all the layers, both on the front, and back. I can't wait to try it out, but it mght be next weekend. I try not to work on anything to brain taxing during the week. I work long hours.

  16. #16
    Super Member barri1's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Patti25314 View Post
    I thought about you a lot today and wondered how it is going! I think if you divide the blocks into piles according to size for the three (or four???) quilts, then square them up to one size -- taking off the least that you have to, and then putting them together in some way that will hold them. I thought your "whipping" was going to be like a basting stitch that probably wouldn't be removed. Then I would take my 4 x 7 big block and lay it down so I could see how wide the sashing needed to be to make it cover those edges. I hope this helps. No matter, remember they will be loved.
    Thanks for thinking about me.
    Right now I am squaring up the squares for my quilt. I can't mix all their squares up. They are all labeled with eveyones naes on them. I had the girls come over, and pick out all their squares, as all the squares are different. I put them together, and FMQ.. Now I have to square them.. That I am getting tortured with..
    Love your dog.. He looks so calm..
    Barri

  17. #17
    Super Member Daylesewblessed's Avatar
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    Barri1,

    Your method will be as strong or stronger than the Welsh quilting method, because the blocks will actually be attached at the edges. They should butt up tight that way. With the Welsh method, if you are a little bit too wide on the sashing, there can actually be a space between the blocks that you can feel with your fingers through the sashing. Let us know how it works out and don't stress too much this week!

    Dayle

  18. #18
    Super Member barri1's Avatar
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    Dayle,
    What you are talking about with the space between the sashing is what caused me to spend hours taking a scalpel to the stitches, and taking everything apart. I don't stress too much about my quilting. I find it very relaxing. I love reading about all the problems people have with the quilting, and how other members are there to rescue them before they climb the walls.. I find it amazing seeing some of the work that some of the members whip up..
    Barri

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    I bught the book by Marti Michel for QAUG but honestly I've never tried it. Don't be afraid to quilt a large (and I do mean LARGE (120 x 120) on your domestic machine. Wish I had some words of wisdom for your current dilemma but I'm sure someone reading your question will be able to help. Again,don't be afraid to do a large quilt on your DSM.

  20. #20
    pal
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    I did a QAYG that 5 of us made together. It was so bad that I had to go buy packaged seam binding and sew it all on by hand, covering the binding that each of us did. That was the only solution that I could come up with. Not my proudest moment........
    PACE - Positive Attitude Changes Everything

    "All things are literally better, lovlier, and more beloved for the imperfections that reflect the human effort that went into their making."

  21. #21
    Super Member k9dancer's Avatar
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    I agree with brenwalt; I FMQ large quilts on my Featherweight. A larger harp is nice, for sure, and is available on a lot of domestic, especially vintage, machines.
    However, QAYG does offer the opportunity to ease into it.
    My suggestion: if you really want to sew the BLOCKS together instead of sewing them to a one inch sashing, I urge you to trim a !/4" strip of batting off of the blocks, leaving the top and backing to extend a 1/4" out with no batting in the seam allowance. Batting in the seam will give a hump in the finished quilt (ask me how I know).
    The advantage of a 1" sashing, especially if you have squared the blocks after FMQ and it's impossible to trim out the batting, is that, sewn accurately, the sashing will be full because the blocks butt up against each other. Then finish by hand sewing the back sashing.
    Stephanie in Mena

  22. #22
    Super Member barri1's Avatar
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    You guys are wonderful. I wasn't in a full panic, as I'm used to things not always in black, and white, and my having to solve problems. It does feel really great to know that I am not the only one that runs into problems with quilting from time to time. My accuracy wasn't. The best part is being able to ask questions, and have board members take the time and explain how to get out of the situation. I did make a major mistake of not doing it in one piece. I have a Singer 66. It has a pretty big harp, and I don't know what I was thinking.
    Thanks everyone..
    Barri

  23. #23
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    When I QAYG -- I layer a center piece with like batting(same size) ;; cut backing 2" wider all around. Center top and batting in the backing square; quilt--- Place each square back to back(right sides together) and sew along the center square. When opened up; I just roll each 2"backing over the top square to make a sashing. Sew it down. do likewise with the rest until you have a row. etc.

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