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Thread: QAYG question... using the backing pulled to the front to sash

  1. #1
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    QAYG question... using the backing pulled to the front to sash

    Clear as mud, right??? I am certain I have seen this done, and a gal at guild suggested it as well. You do the normal QAYG but the backing fabric is a particular measurement larger than the front and batting. You seam the blocks together against the batting and front, (thus leaving a large "seam" on the front) and then turn the seam allowances and sew them on the front as a sashing. Can anyone help????

  2. #2
    Super Member Kassaundra's Avatar
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    I haven't seen any tutorials, but if I were going to guess, I would say if your block fronts were constructed w/ outside points or patterns that you would lose w/ a bigger then 1/4 inch seam that the over lap should be 1/2 inch. Fold the first 1/4 inch over then the 1/4 remaining would be the normal seam allowance and not interfere w/ your block pattern, this would give you a sashing of 1/2 inch (1/4 on each block). However if your front block pattern has no points or patterning to lose you could make it whatever size you like. I would keep it smaller though, less chance of stretch or pulling.
    "Never cruel, nor cowardly, never give up, never give in."

    Let's take care of the Earth, it is the only planet that for sure has Chocolate.

    Sonic screwdrivers, fez, bow ties, and Stetsons are cool.

  3. #3
    Super Member Kassaundra's Avatar
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    Oh and I also think it would be easier to "oversize" your back by some "fudge room" over what you decide and trim to the desired size after sewing in place.
    "Never cruel, nor cowardly, never give up, never give in."

    Let's take care of the Earth, it is the only planet that for sure has Chocolate.

    Sonic screwdrivers, fez, bow ties, and Stetsons are cool.

  4. #4
    Super Member Kassaundra's Avatar
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    I think I would also use a dab (small spots) of elmer's stick school glue to secure it in place before sewing
    "Never cruel, nor cowardly, never give up, never give in."

    Let's take care of the Earth, it is the only planet that for sure has Chocolate.

    Sonic screwdrivers, fez, bow ties, and Stetsons are cool.

  5. #5
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    I saw it done as a demo at a show a few years ago, but if I remember correctly, she cut the back 1" larger on each side so after you sewed together, you would fold 1/2", then 1/2" again and sew to top of block on each side. You would end up with 1" sashing with seam down middle. She was selling a ruler to go with the technique, but don't remember who she was. I'm sure you could cut whatever width you wanted.
    Last edited by yngldy; 05-28-2017 at 11:27 AM.

  6. #6
    Super Member mandyrose's Avatar
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    maybe this will help it's called batting buddy and it'd done the way you describe http://www.junctionfabric.com/shop/N...1-x9489207.htm scroll down a little and there is a video

  7. #7
    Super Member Stitchnripper's Avatar
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    I think that is the Fun and Done method. They have a you tube video. I made one of those. It was fun and it was done.
    Alyce

  8. #8
    Super Member GEMRM's Avatar
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    Wasn't "The Cotton Theory" method similar to this?
    A husband is the perfect confidant to tell your secrets to - he can't reveal them to anyone else because he wasn't really listening when you told him!

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    Go to You Tube and check out Missouri Star Quilts "Quilt as you go any block" and watch Jenny's tutorial and her method of quilt as you go. I just viewed Jenny's tutorial and think I will try it. I have used always used Sharon Pederson's reversible quilt methods in the past and am using her method currently for my son's picture memory quilt. SP' method requires separate sashing cut for the back and the front for each block, plus hand stitching the front sashing on every block and every row across. I still have to do my daughter's picture memory quilt and I think I will try Jenny's method, saves a lot of extra sewing of the sashing. **An important tip to remember when sewing the sashing down be sure you fold the sashing on each block and each row all going in the same direction if you use SP's method otherwise your sashing on the blocks will not line up, and will be staggered and off center.I does give you a different pattern if you ha every other sashing block folded in opposite directions.** I'm anxious to try Jenny's method, Jenny's seems to be like the one that uses the $22.00 ruler set in the Junction fabric shop video listed on this thread posting by mandy rose

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    I have a question about this method of fun and done. After sewing your strips down to the batting and backing is it o.k. to meander the block also?

  11. #11
    Super Member Stitchnripper's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by lindaschipper View Post
    I have a question about this method of fun and done. After sewing your strips down to the batting and backing is it o.k. to meander the block also?
    I would say yes. You can adapt the process to your liking. I've considered doing that too but have other projects first. You don't really need their templates if you can cut squares accurately. Then you can make them any size.
    Alyce

  12. #12
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    There is a way that you do NOT have to do any hand sewing https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-pL36s08wg4 that I an going to do.

  13. #13
    Super Member Kassaundra's Avatar
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    I have done many types of QAYG and have never hand sewn anything.
    Quote Originally Posted by Carol34446 View Post
    There is a way that you do NOT have to do any hand sewing https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-pL36s08wg4 that I an going to do.
    "Never cruel, nor cowardly, never give up, never give in."

    Let's take care of the Earth, it is the only planet that for sure has Chocolate.

    Sonic screwdrivers, fez, bow ties, and Stetsons are cool.

  14. #14
    Super Member citruscountyquilter's Avatar
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    This is the fun and done method. You make your backing 2" larger than your front block so you have 1" all the way around when the front and batting is centered on the backing. The batting is is the same size as the block front.
    Quilt your block before you sew them together. To sew the blocks together put the right sides of the backs together and using a zipper foot stitch close to the batting and the front block. Once this is done you will have two 1" pieces of backing sticking up toward the front. Lay the block flat and take one of the backing flaps and fold it with the raw edge next to the stitching (in other words, fold it in 1/2") then fold it again over the front. You'll have a 1/2" sashing on the one side of the block. Stitch close to the folded edge. Do the same on the other side. The end result is that you will have a 1" total sashing of the backing fabric showing between your blocks. Continue this across the row. Joins the rows together in the same fashion. Once all the squares are joined you will have a 1" of backing fabric showing all around the edge of your quilt. Use this for the binding. Fold in 1/2" and then fold over again and stitch close to the folded edge. You can miter the corners or fold them them at 90 degrees to complete.

  15. #15
    Super Member citruscountyquilter's Avatar
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    Here is a picture of sewing the rows together. In it you can see the sashing between the blocks and the zipper foot sewing the rows together. This was a baby blanket so I didn't use batting but used an extra layer of flannel instead. The squares were small (3") so I didn't quilt each square either. I was using up some tiny scraps to make this.
    Attached Images Attached Images

  16. #16
    Super Member Kassaundra's Avatar
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    Those pictures explain it well. You would have to be careful when picking your front block pattern so that your sashing / binding doesn't interfere w/ the block design. It was perfect for your "whole cloth blocks". I bet it would be great w/ applique blocks too. I think it would need an extra step for most pieced blocks, I think if the pieced block fronts had a narrow border added before sandwiching that would take care of loosing points and patterns in the pieced block.
    "Never cruel, nor cowardly, never give up, never give in."

    Let's take care of the Earth, it is the only planet that for sure has Chocolate.

    Sonic screwdrivers, fez, bow ties, and Stetsons are cool.

  17. #17
    Super Member Kassaundra's Avatar
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    Oh and I meant to say what a great idea that is for a quick and easy baby blanket. A fabric w/ a print that could be fussy cut for the front squares and a coordinating back print.
    "Never cruel, nor cowardly, never give up, never give in."

    Let's take care of the Earth, it is the only planet that for sure has Chocolate.

    Sonic screwdrivers, fez, bow ties, and Stetsons are cool.

  18. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by GEMRM View Post
    Wasn't "The Cotton Theory" method similar to this?
    Cotton Theory is similar to this, but with Cotton Theory, both top and back pieces are cut one inch larger. The batt is placed between them and that piece is then quilted. She did the quilting with decorative stitches on the sewing machine. All pieces are done this way. If a square has strips around it, the square and each strip are cut one inch larger, the batt piece is centered between the top and back; it is quilted and then added. The seams are made in a very special manner to make "high-ways, freeways, one way streets and sidewalks". And you have to be very careful about your "intersections". There quilts are always reversible. They look good from both sides.

    I made one this way and was glad I did.
    Mavita - Square dancer and One Room School Teacher

  19. #19
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    PERFECT!!! YES!! That is exactly what I was trying to say! Thank you!

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