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Thread: Question on all the beautiful quilting I see on here....

  1. #1
    Super Member MollieSue's Avatar
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    Using as an example - I was just admiring MaryStoaks 'Turning Twenty' quilt she posted pictures of. And I know most of you quilt just as beautifully!
    My question - How is that done? Would I (if only I could. haha) be able to do that kind of quilting on my regular plain jane Brother sewing machine? Or do you need a more high tech machine? And do you all draw the pattern on, and then follow it?
    I'm trying to quilt the green ribbon quilt I made, and am having a time with it just stitching in the ditch!
    I would just love to think someday I could do this type of quilting too.
    :-)

  2. #2
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    Yes you can Diana, just keep practicing. :)

  3. #3
    Super Member MollieSue's Avatar
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    Thank you Shadow, for the vote of confidence! :wink: So this type of quilting is done using a regular type sewing machine?

  4. #4
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    If you can doodle on paper, you can free motion with your sewing machine, it just takes practice. :)

  5. #5
    Super Member MollieSue's Avatar
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    So the type of quilting MaryStoaks did, as an example, is referred to as free motion too? I thought that referred to more of the meandering, stippling, etc?

  6. #6
    Super Member Maride's Avatar
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    Hi Diana, in general, any form of quilting that is not a straight line is considered free motion. You can follow a particular pattern or you can do your own thing. For example, I like stipples, which is squiggly lines that never cross each other, or loops, which is just that, loops. Sometimes I just outline the borders of the design printed on the fabric. For the machine, I use my old Bernina that is 30 years old. You can use almost any domestic machine, but you need to practice a lot and test the setitng on your machine. There is no magic number I can tell you that will make it work for you, but you need to adjust the tension on your machine, almost for every quilt. Any little thing can affect the results. I find that different thickness of batting affect the final look of your quilting. Also, how heavy your quilt is. If you have a small table and try to quilt a big heavy quilt, the weight of the quilt will pull and change the tension. As you can see there are many variables that to consider.

    As mentioned before, the best thing to do is to practice. It will get better with time. I sell many quilts and have my own online store for my quilts, and 6 years ago I walked out of a machine quilting class because I couldn't do it.

    Good luck,

    Maria

  7. #7
    Super Member MollieSue's Avatar
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    Thanks Maria!
    I've been searching on here for hints, and am wishing I could find a tutorial.
    What is the reason for changing the tension? Looser stitches? I've never change my tension before, it's not something I could get messed up if I did?
    I did see a link for 'Batts In The Attic', to see all her hints. One was to always use low loft batting. I, of course, bought high loft because it was cheapest! So now I know why my green ribbon quilt is looking so puffy, as I'm quilting it in the ditch! I'm going to continue stitching it in the ditch, but then want to try some free motion in the borders....
    Thanks for the hints, and for sharing about your own perserverence! (sp?)
    :-)

  8. #8
    Super Member gcathie's Avatar
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    My quilts are all done on a longarm machine.....I tried quilting on my sewing machine....I wasn't happy with the results....the throat wasn't big enough....just had all kinds of problems....But a lot of quilters can quilt like that on there regular machines and you may be one of them ....so give it a try on a smaller quilt top and see how you do....good luck

  9. #9
    Super Member MaryStoaks's Avatar
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    Diana, I quilted the Turning Twenty on my Tin Lizzie, 18" machine on its frame. I can only imagine how hard it would be moving the fabric instead of the machine. My neighbor uses her DSM for stitch in the ditch and it is very nice. Before I got Lizzie I had a Handi Quilter 2 frame and used my older Bernina machine. It worked but there was so little throat space and the tension was a constant issue.
    For retirement I got Lizzie second hand. We took out our kitchen table to make room and now eat in the livingroom or patio. My husband supports my addiction.
    The Turning Twenty quilt is just loops, side to side. I am learning controll.
    I have lots to learn about quilting techniques and I plan to ask lots of questions of the more experianced/brave quilters on this great forum.
    Thanks all for the kind words,
    Mary

  10. #10
    Super Member zyxquilts's Avatar
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    Yes Mary, you can do all kinds of quilting on your "regular" machine! As many have said already, it just takes practice. :D
    Have you ever seen any of Ricky Tims quilts? I've seen him doing the "fancy" quilting on his regular Bernina! I've also seen quilters at my guild meetings - members & speakers - who have quilted BIG quilts on their 'regular' sized machines.
    Personally, I think quilting in the ditch is harder than free-motion stitching :wink: I get stressed trying to stay on those straight lines! LOL

  11. #11
    Moderator tlrnhi's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Diana Rainer
    Using as an example - I was just admiring MaryStoaks 'Turning Twenty' quilt she posted pictures of. And I know most of you quilt just as beautifully!
    My question - How is that done? Would I (if only I could. haha) be able to do that kind of quilting on my regular plain jane Brother sewing machine? Or do you need a more high tech machine? And do you all draw the pattern on, and then follow it?
    I'm trying to quilt the green ribbon quilt I made, and am having a time with it just stitching in the ditch!
    I would just love to think someday I could do this type of quilting too.
    :-)
    OF course you can! You don't need the new-fangled ones. Heck, if I can do it, you can too!!

  12. #12
    Super Member MollieSue's Avatar
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    Thanks Mary, Gcathie, Sue, & Terrie! I've never seen it done, or known anyone personally who does it, so it still seems kind of hard to imagine.
    And patience is not one of my virtues, so I'm going to have to think of the practice as another project....
    Thank you all again! :D

  13. #13
    Super Member carrieg's Avatar
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    Diana
    Try YouTube! (I can't because I have dialup internet.) But I know there are tutorials for quilting there. I think if you do a search, you might find a few.

  14. #14
    Super Member MollieSue's Avatar
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    Thanks Carrieg, I'll look there too! I just found this site, and wanted to post it for anyone else wondering.

    http://www.ask.com/bar?q=how+to+free...-tutorial.html

    I don't have a darning foot, and this link says it goes up and down with the needle? So that's a must have, I can't just use my regular foot?

  15. #15
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    i agree, you can quilt on a regular sewing machine. many world famous quilt artists do it such as caryl bryer fallert and paula nadlestern.

    if you're going to do free motion you'll drop the feed dogs and use a darning foot or if you have a foot that you use to do embroidery on the machine you can use that.

    you can either buy stencils and mark your quilt with the design and follow along or you can mark the design onto paper and pin that to the quilt and follow along on those lines.

    there's a company called quilting made easy that sells designs already on paper and you just attach it to your quilt.


  16. #16
    Super Member Rose Marie's Avatar
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    When starting out the best practice is to only do free motion on the borders. No bulk under the arm of the machine.
    Simple stencils like hearts or leaves that are continuous line work the best.
    The inside of the quilt just use the walking food for a grid pattern.
    This has worked for me and now I am ready to do free motion on the whole quilt but I admit I bought a machine with a 10 inch throat.
    What a difference it has made.

  17. #17
    Power Poster littlehud's Avatar
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    I started out quilting on my regular machine. Just doing free motion on the borders worked OK. I have since invested in a Juki machine with a nine inch throat. Freed me up to try free motion on the whole quilt. My machine was 599.00. Seemed like a lot at the time, but when I look at the price of other machines it not to bad. Had to save for a while, but it was worth the price. I know I've gotten more than 599 in fun out of it.

  18. #18
    Super Member sidmona's Avatar
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    I use a Juki also and have free motion quilted a king size quilt on it. I use the stencils and the paper. Like the others say, it just takes practice.

  19. #19
    Super Member MollieSue's Avatar
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    Thank you Klue, Rose Marie, Littlehud, and Sidmona!!
    My machine came with the little plate that covers the feed dogs, I just need to get the darning foot. I did just get a quilting foot.
    I've read the posts about quilting patterns, just never really thought about it all the way through. duh. lol!!!
    You all really are such an inspiration!!!! :-) :-)

  20. #20
    Power Poster sandpat's Avatar
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    I've quilted all my quilts (both large and small) on my regular home sewing machine..either a very old Singer or my newer Bernina. If you checked the Bats in the Attic website, you have seen Paula's work....she quilts ONLY with her Bernina. I've taken 2 classes from her and she swears that SHE sees NO reason to buy a long arm. Now...that is just her opinion, however..my quilts have all looked just fine and I don't have room for a long or mid arm, so....there's no choice to be made for me.

    You CAN do the same and/or even more beautiful quilting...all you have to do is try and practice! :lol:

  21. #21
    Super Member MollieSue's Avatar
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    Thank you Sandpat! It's still hard for me to imagine myself doing what you all do! It is so good to know it all can be done on just a regular machine! Totally amazes me! I admire you all for your patience in your initial practicing. As soon as I get this ribbon quilt on it's way, I'm going to start!
    :-)

  22. #22
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    For stitch-in-the-ditch, a walking foot is especially helpful to keep all the layers going through more or less evenly.


  23. #23
    Super Member Quilting Aggi's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by kluedesigns
    .

    there's a company called quilting made easy that sells designs already on paper and you just attach it to your quilt.
    I have used those types of designs on two of my free motion quilts (the first two I ever free motion quilted) and they turned out great!

    I do agree with everyone else.. practice.. practice... practice... :)

    Good Luck!

  24. #24
    Super Member Barb M's Avatar
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    Oh you can do it :) I just did my first ever free-motion on my rose raffle quilt. I bought darning foot, it has a spring and jumps up and down, and it only cost 10 dollars. Practice on a scrap piece, and then try the borders on your quilt. I've always done stitch in the ditch, but i really loved doing the free motion, found it easier than stitch in the ditch. And my machine is a 40 year old kenmore :)

  25. #25
    Super Member MollieSue's Avatar
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    Bearisgray - is the walking foot the same as the regular foot which came with my machine? Or is it something different?

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