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Thread: Questions Regarding Thread for Sewing Machine

  1. #1
    Senior Member littlebitoheaven's Avatar
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    Questions Regarding Thread for Sewing Machine

    I had an interesting day today. I had to take my Brother Innova 2000 in to be serviced and the lady at the service center told me that I should be using "Brother" thread. I had no idea that Brother made/sold thread. (Can't find it on line.) Further, she told me that my machine is made to use 60 weight thread. At Superior University, the #60 thread is "Bottom Line". I am very confused... so my question is, and I would like to use this thread top and bottom, which threads have you found to be most successful and I would like to buy a "group" of threads rather than 1 spool at a time. This gives me a variety of colors that I could have on hand.

    Thank you in advance for your usual expert advice. Yolanda Wood River

  2. #2
    Power Poster mighty's Avatar
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    I do not understand onething she told you! Brother thread????????????

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    I've never heard of such. Maybe she was trying to get you to order through their store, if there is such a thing as Brother thread. I've used everything from WalMart's Coats and Clark's to Guettermann. It just depends on what I'm doing. The type of thread changes from project to project. I'm not a thread purist. If my machine likes it, I use it!

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    Power Poster Prism99's Avatar
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    In my opinion, any sewing machine should be able to use a variety of different threads.

    Had never heard of it, but here is a link to Brother thread:
    http://www.amazon.com/Brother-6-Pack.../dp/B002U0K8G4

    Bottom Line (a polyester thread) isn't the only thread that is 60 wt. Mettler has a silk-finish cotton thread that is 60wt.

  5. #5
    Super Member Dolphyngyrl's Avatar
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    Ignore. I have had brothers all my life and have never used brother thread, have used coats and clark, gurtterman, mettler, sulky, connecting threads, madeira, thread art, superior all with no problem, sounds like she is trying to sell you something
    Brother (XL-3500i, CV3550, SQ-9050, Dreamweaver XE6200D), Juki MO-2000QVP, Handiquilter Avante

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    Super Member valleyquiltermo's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dolphyngyrl View Post
    Ignore. I have had brothers all my life and have never used brother thread, have used coats and clark, gurtterman, mettler, sulky, connecting threads, madeira, thread art, superior all with no problem, sounds like she is trying to sell you something
    I agree, I have an 30 yr old brother and it is still working fine and it was a cheap wal-mart one. I have used so many different threads with it. Also it has never been serviced by anyone but me.
    http://www.skillpages.com/DonnaValleyquiltermo
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    Power Poster BellaBoo's Avatar
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    Walmart has Brother thread here. It's comes in a four or six pack of different colors. It's not cheap but not too pricey compared to other big name brands. I have some and it's good thread. I use it in bobbin and top. 50wt thread doesn't mean anything unless you know the ply. Aurifil is 50 wt 2 ply, Connecting Threads is 50 wt 3 ply, just for an example. Each takes a different size needle. It took me a long time to understand thread weight, ply and type. If your machine threads on the outside like most of the older models then lint isn't a problem. The inside threading many of the newer machines have, the lint will be a problem - no where for it to go but pile up inside. The more thread guides on a machine the better. That's why so many vintage models stitch so great with most any thread.
    Got fabric?

  8. #8
    Super Member Scissor Queen's Avatar
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    Personally I think she's full of it clear up to her eyeballs. Sewing machines are adjustable. You can use nearly any thread as long as you have the right needle.

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    My brother actually came with a roll of Brother thread. I found it to be terrible thread. I have a spool that is almost full, if you'd like to try it.

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    Super Member Peckish's Avatar
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    I think she had no clue what she was talking about. I bet if you contacted Brother Corporate, or a local dealer (if she's not the dealer) they would tell you the same. I agree with previous posters, machines are meant to accept many sizes of thread, that's why the tension is adjustable.

    Having said that, I do have to say that I love Bottom Line thread and you can't go wrong with it.

  11. #11
    Super Member amandasgramma's Avatar
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    I'm with the others ---- I've sewn with a lot of sewing machines and ANY machine can take ANY thread. It's a matter of tweeking the tensions. Continue with what you're using.
    Dee


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    Machnes have a mind of their own when it come to thread. Use what works in your machine and you like the type an quality. this business of machine/brand/thread is..........well you fill in the blanks. My machines work with any thread I put on it I love the older Coats and Clark and buy all I can find. as well as that spool that still has the 25 cent price tag on it.

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    My guess is that some threads just wind up as "lemons" as anything else. I usually have good luck with star thread, but then had a spool that kept breaking on me, so I purchased a cone of King Tut for 29 buckaroos, Guess what, I still had breaks, so I went back to the star, and have been fine since. I am a fan of sulky for applique. I say, it is like anything else, find a brand that you have good luck with, and that is affordable for you and stick to it, regardless of other people's opinions and preference.

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    Power Poster BellaBoo's Avatar
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    Be sure to match the needle size to the thread. That is more important then what brand of thread you use.
    Got fabric?

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    How do you know what needle size to use for what thread? Forgive the ignorance but I'm new to quilting/sewing.

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    Senior Member littlebitoheaven's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by josykatz View Post
    How do you know what needle size to use for what thread? Forgive the ignorance but I'm new to quilting/sewing.
    Hi Josy! I am probably not the one to answer this question but what I normally use with 50 wt 2 ply is an 80/12. As I understand it, the heavier the thread the larger the number needle, i.e. 90. This question could be best answered on line. I know that Superior Thread Company has a DVD out that explains threads and needles. I do not have this DVD, but am considering buying it. Yolanda Wood River

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    Super Member Peckish's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by josykatz View Post
    How do you know what needle size to use for what thread? Forgive the ignorance but I'm new to quilting/sewing.
    Superior Threads has an EXCELLENT section of their website dedicated to education. For needle vs thread size, check out this chart. Even if you have a thread that is not theirs, you can compare the type and weight of your thread (which should be listed on the end of the spool) and find a similar thread on the chart, then see what needle is recommended.

    https://www.superiorthreads.com/medi...guide-home.pdf

    You can also go to www.superiorthreads.com, across the top of the page you will see a series of colored tabs. Click the green one labeled "Education" and you will have a wealth of information at your fingertips for free!

    No affiliation, just a happy customer and proud Bottom Line addict.

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    yes Brother sells thread. i would want a second opinion. I have had Brothers for years and used all kinds of threads including Brother. Sounds like she was trying to sell you something.

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    Super Member Knitette's Avatar
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    Absolute tosh! I've lost count of the number of threads (no pun intended) I've seen where people comment that their machines don't 'like' a particular thread.

    A machine does what you 'tell' it to - it is an inanimate object (much as we love them and give them names, lol). It may mean tinkering with the tension, bigger needle eye or changing needles - amazing what a sharp needle will achieve.

    My Janome is the original Martini girl - any needle, any thread, any time (hope you all had that TV advert in the US.....). I even FMQ in metallic on it.

    However my new Pfaff has been breaking it's bobbin thread despite all of the above, for both me and the shop owner so now back at Pfaff. When it comes back I expect it to do everything my Janome does or I'll be hounding them until it does.
    Lang may yer lum reek. (I'm a knitter - hence - 'Knit-ette'. Confuses a lot of people!)

  20. #20
    Super Member Mitch's mom's Avatar
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    As far as I know Brother thread is made by Robison-Anton. If you have a Brother Disney embroidery machine the color chart is based on Robison-Anton thread. Embroidery thread is 40wt. I have a couple spools of Brother 60wt poly bobbin thread that is made in Japan by Ozeki, maybe bobbin thread is what she was referring to when she said 60wt. I don't use it. I use Coats and Clark poly bobbin at 70 wt and love it, so does my machine. It is the only Coats and Clark thread I use in my machines.

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    Bumping an old thread (ha! I made a funny...given the subject matter) because that link that Peggy gave is a WEALTH of information! Thank you so much!

  22. #22
    Super Member Boston1954's Avatar
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    If you are looking for groups of thread, try Connecting Threads. They have sets of 10 spools in groups that go together. Very reasonable in price also.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Knitette View Post
    Absolute tosh! I've lost count of the number of threads (no pun intended) I've seen where people comment that their machines don't 'like' a particular thread.

    A machine does what you 'tell' it to - it is an inanimate object (much as we love them and give them names, lol). It may mean tinkering with the tension, bigger needle eye or changing needles - amazing what a sharp needle will achieve.

    My Janome is the original Martini girl - any needle, any thread, any time (hope you all had that TV advert in the US.....). I even FMQ in metallic on it.

    However my new Pfaff has been breaking it's bobbin thread despite all of the above, for both me and the shop owner so now back at Pfaff. When it comes back I expect it to do everything my Janome does or I'll be hounding them until it does.
    I have 2 brothers and use what ever I have close at hand with the color I need. I slow the speed down with metallics but it is more for the needle grooving than thread. And I also FMQ with metallics on my brothers.

    I will say though, my machines dont like pre-wound bobbins, they always mess up. Tried everything, finally just decided they dont like the pre-wound....so just wind my own. Sometimes machines do "tell" you what works best. Many of my quilt projects "tell" me what they want as well. Of course I might just be crazy

    I always based my needle on the fabric I am using, then select a thread for that needle/fabric, rather than selecting needle first. Jeans and upholstery materials require heavier duty needles than cotton, and thread also needs to be heavier. For standard cotton piecing, I use an 80/20 universal with 60wt thread. For embroidery I use 70/11 with 40wt thread. just depends on the fabric and what I am doing,

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    Quote Originally Posted by CarolynMT View Post
    Sometimes machines do "tell" you what works best. Many of my quilt projects "tell" me what they want as well. Of course I might just be crazy
    I don't think so...I hear those voices, too...since I'm a newbie, not always on the projects, but I definitely hear them in the fabric store
    (insert creepy voices-in-your-head sound here) {{"...buy meeeee....buy meeee...."}}

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    When I started quilting, I switched to 100% cotton thread (cotton fabric / cotton thread -- well, it made sense to me). I started out with Gutterman and had absolutely no problems, though many members of the quilt police would ask me WHY I used THAT thread. It does create lint, but all threads do. And I clean the lint out every time I change the bobbin. Then I took a machine quilting class with Harriet Hargrave, and she gave us a sample of Prescencia thread. I love it, it works fine in my Bernina, and there's a little cachet in saying "It's made in Spain". It creates much less lint than the Gutterman. I purchased a cone of white, beige, gray and black, and find that I can sew almost anything. I now use the Gutterman for sewing on bindings, since I have almost every color they sell. I use an 80/12 needle for piecing and a 90/14 for topstitching. I also use the 90/14 for paper piecing, though those darn quilt police tell me I should be using a smaller needle. I had never heard of Brother thread until this thread, so looked at the Amazon.com link. It's poly-cotton, so I won't buy it.

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