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Thread: Quilting Class

  1. #76
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    I did not take a class when I made my first quilt. I had done some sewing in the past. And I watched "Simply Quilts" all the time. It turned out OK. But I really wanted help with how to sandwich the quilt and then machine quilt. So I took a beginning quitling class. It only covered making the quilt top. I was really disappointed but I did learn many great tips. And it was great to have fun with the ladies. I was totally surprised to hear that many people send their quilts to someone else to do the quilting.

    I read several books and just talked to other quilters. I put together everyone's hints and I can now make a quilt from beginning to end.

    I take a class once in a while now. I always learn something new.

  2. #77
    Super Member chairjogger's Avatar
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    I did. and my project is still not finished. I have maybe 100 stitches and it will be done.

    30 years ago my stitches were small and perfect. I think that is why I never finished it.. Perfection.. crazy.. It is the perfect color for my walls again !

    Thanks for the reminder.. need to finish that darn thing !!

    Log cabin, card tricks, honey bee, applique hearts in a four leaf clover design.

    Ellen

  3. #78
    Super Member lass's Avatar
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    My first quilt I hand pieced it, blanket stiched the pre-printed Santa appliques and hand EMBROIDERED the thing together. I didn't know about quilting.......LOL. Then I got a an idea to do a quilt for my mom and just started to do it only this time machined pieced, hand appliqued and finally quilted together. Then I took a class!!! It made things much simpler and after reading a book on hand quilting by Alex Anderson I hand quilted it together. I have taken other classes and my guild runs mystery bees and new members classes all the time. The new members bee always tries to teach a technique. It's usually fun even if you are not new to quilting.

  4. #79
    Super Member Rose Marie's Avatar
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    I forgot about my first quilt, a disaster.
    Back when they had liquid embroidery I traced coloring book pictures and painted them with liquid embrodery pens. This turned out nice but them made the mistake of using a wool blanket for batting. When washed it shrank so much it ruined the quilt.
    This was before the internet and tv quilting shows. Now I have learned how to quilt and am addicted.

  5. #80
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    I did one quilt first then took a sampler class. I really learned lots doing all the different blocks. It was all done by hand but each square turned out perfect and I still have that quilt some 30 years later. Love it. I took tow others a Trip around the World Strip quilt and a log cabin. I haven't done any for years but I'd like to take some more classes but haven't any place offering them that is close. They are fun to see others doing the same pattern and how each is so different.

  6. #81
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    My friend made quilted handbags and I kept commenting how lovely there were. She said they were easy to make and invited me over to show me how. That was 3 years ago - and I got hooked! After making a few bags, cushions and an "I spy" simply squares quilt, I wanted to do intricate projects and joined a class. My first class was a stack and whack workshop - and I loved it, only problem I havent finished that quilt because when I went to the class, I saw another quilt class I wanted to do, and I went to that... I have finished that quilt top, and I have enrolled in 2 more workshops for this year and I signed up to the monthly beginners machine piecing and quilting class - I want to learn how to do fancy machine quilting on my domestic sewing machine, and I am taking the quilt top from the class last year, plus it will give me incentive to finish the first workshop quilt top so I can quilt it at the class.

  7. #82

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    I didn't take a class when I first started quilting. I had been a dressmaker since I was a teen and just wanted to start when my first grandchild was on the way. I also watched Simply Quilts when it was on TV for many years before deciding to start quilting. Maybe a class would have helped me. The sewing was no problem but choosing colors is a huge hurdle for me.

    Good luck!

    Teddie

  8. #83
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    You are absolutely right, Teddie. The selection of colors will make your quilt. I learned that we tend to select meduims and not enough darks and lights but even that knowledge doesn't help make the choices. I get into the quilt and end up thinking,"thats not right" and then another UFQ is born. Or we can overthink the whole thing too.

  9. #84
    Senior Member Letty's Avatar
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    Hello nana2,that was a wonderful story,I love to read of the history behind the craft of patchwork and quilting.In these days of 'instant' and now' it is so refreshing , and I think that all of those that help preserve the old crafts give hope of a happier future. More such stories please,Love Letty.

  10. #85
    Senior Member Letty's Avatar
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    Hello, just a postscript to my last posting, you in the U.S.A are so lucky, here in the U.K, have no t.v. quilt programmes, and many of our quilting supply shops are closing.We rely more and more on the web and wonderful sites like this one ----so many thanks. Love, Letty

  11. #86
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    I too appreciate learning how certain crafts/arts began AND I have an even greater appreciation for the generations before us who had such limited tools. I also have a great appreciation for those who have been able to design the great the tools we now use with such success and time saved. Recently on our Public Broadcasting Station, Sewing With Nancy featured a demo of sewing circles. The guest was using an embrodiery machine; but Nancy demoed using a thumb tack. Then right after this I saw a PBS show of Fons & Porter with a guest sewing circles using a special foot for the sewing machine. The next time I visited our sewing machine store I asked about one of these feet for my machine --- the cost was almost $50.00. I came home, got out a thumb tack and went to the sewing machine ---- Works Great!!! So, it does pay to have some of us from the "older" generation around to demo the "how to" without some of the modern tools. With the present economy going down many of us may need to be a little more conserative in our spending and will need to rely on each other for info to help us find a way to accomplish a task without buying an expensive tool. I really think that quilters may find that our attitudes and willinness to help each other will piece together and hold together more than fabric.

  12. #87
    Super Member sewjoyce's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by nana2
    I too appreciate learning how certain crafts/arts began AND I have an even greater appreciation for the generations before us who had such limited tools. I also have a great appreciation for those who have been able to design the great the tools we now use with such success and time saved. Recently on our Public Broadcasting Station, Sewing With Nancy featured a demo of sewing circles. The guest was using an embrodiery machine; but Nancy demoed using a thumb tack. Then right after this I saw a PBS show of Fons & Porter with a guest sewing circles using a special foot for the sewing machine. The next time I visited our sewing machine store I asked about one of these feet for my machine --- the cost was almost $50.00. I came home, got out a thumb tack and went to the sewing machine ---- Works Great!!! So, it does pay to have some of us from the "older" generation around to demo the "how to" without some of the modern tools. With the present economy going down many of us may need to be a little more conserative in our spending and will need to rely on each other for info to help us find a way to accomplish a task without buying an expensive tool. I really think that quilters may find that our attitudes and willinness to help each other will piece together and hold together more than fabric.
    OK, I give -- how do you make a circle using a thumb tack??????

  13. #88
    Junior Member marty_mo's Avatar
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    Nope ~ self starter. I've been sewing for years and thought...how hard could it be...right? 8) Between books and the internet I taught myself.

  14. #89
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    Quote Originally Posted by Pam S
    Quote Originally Posted by QuiltyLisa
    I am a quilt class drop out. I signed up for a 6 week class at the local learning center paid my 130$ and dropped out after the second class. I am a lefty and the teacher was teaching righty learning and she kept telling me I was doing everything wrong, and backwards embarrassing me in front of the class and she gave me a hard time because I choose brights for my first little wall hanging project when she said in the flyer light or pastels colors would be best... I am not a fan of pastels at all and it did'nt say I "had" to use pastels.

    So I dropped out bought some books and learned my own slow way.
    And thanks to my BFF who is also a quilter (we met online) she has walked me through many a technique with lots of patience.
    Sounds like you met one of the Quilt Police. I always heard they were out there someplace.
    Ohhhh, I'd love to take a class from her... :twisted: :twisted: yes, I am evil.......mmmwwwahhhhahahahah

  15. #90
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    you take a string, tie it to a pencil, stick the tack into the other end of the thread and into a cardboard and use it for the center.. keep the string taut and mark the circle..
    The string should be length of the radius of the circle you want to make.

    Well, that's how to draft a circle using a tack... not sure about using one with a machine to stitch them.. that would be interesting to know.

  16. #91
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    The most amazing thing happens when an instructor shows you how to cut and while sewing the pieces together-mentions tips along the way.
    The class is $5 a semester and by the 2-3 month; I could look at a pattern and tell how to make it more mine. Plus I totally enjoy the humor directed at us "weird" quilters-they get it when I told them that I put off hair cuts in order to buy more stash.

  17. #92
    Super Member sidmona's Avatar
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    No class for me. A friend got me started and into a quilt guild. My first quilt was a sampler that I machine pieced and hand quilted. Loved doing the hand quilting but due to arthritis had to give it up = all machine quilting now. Have done a few quilts and find that following the instructions and working on it myself I learn better.

  18. #93
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    The thumb tack is pushed thru a piece of tape from the stickey side up. This allows the sewer to tape the tack down with the point up. Take a small ruler and line up with the needle straight to the left, you could make some sort of a mark. This will be where the center of the head of the tack is taped down and this needs to align with the needle. I found that using a second piece of tape that goes across the first piece is helpful. Cut two squares of fabric, larger than the circle you want. I also found that using a stablizer was necessary. I used a fusible on just one of the squares. Stack the squares one on top of the other, Then fold the square in half first from one direction then the other direction to find the center of the square. Right where the two fold lines cross should be the center. With the tack already taped to the machine bed, push the point of the tack thru both fabrics and stablizer. With the fabric under the pressure foot, start sewing being sure to sort of help the fabric stay down on the tack. Go slow at first and you will see how the fabric feeds around. My first test was with just straight stiches. There are a lot of things that can be done once you are comfortable with this technique. Squares of fabric with the stablizer can be sewn with the right sides together then after completion trim close to the seam with peaking shears, make a slit (for turning) in the back of the fabric which would be your backing fabric, then pull the front fabric thru this slit, use your favorite seam/corner dodad to get the seam smooth, then press. If I remember correctly, the Fons & Porter show was using these circles as an applique in a quilt, the Sewing with Nancy was cutting the circles in half and using like pararie points on the front of a jacket. I did some test sewing on a piece of fabric using wash away stablizer and decorative stiches. This was not fabric stacked and sewn to gether to turn, just a a single piece of fabric with a HEAVY STABLIZER (the plastic like stuff) This did not work well the stablizer was too slippery. The wash away stuff that looks more like a dryer sheet used in two thicknesses worked best for me. I have in mind being able to take some solid colored fabric and using some embroidery thread and decorative stiches and sewing circles of various sizes to make the fabric more pleasing to the eye for a jacket or blouse. I do see a lot of shows about a lot of emblishments to fabric to creat a very pleasing look and I've noticed that there are a lot of fabrics now with printed circles of various sizes. Some overlap, some have heavier lines, etc. It could be the answer to using some ugly fabric in a very creative way. As I have been writing this, I have been reminded that a picture is worth a thousand words. Hope you get the picture of how this is done. Others may have been much better at the explanation.

  19. #94
    Super Member sewjoyce's Avatar
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    nana2 -- great instructions! And yes I can "see" what you're talking about!!

    Thanks!!!! :D

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