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Thread: Quilts for cold climate

  1. #1
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    Quilts for cold climate

    I am making a flannel quilt for a young lady at school in Madison, Wi. should I put in two layers of warm and natural or use a different batting

    Thanks for all the wonderful information posted by all!

  2. #2
    Power Poster ManiacQuilter2's Avatar
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    My only concern is if you are quilting it, will your machine handle the two layers of batting?? I know that some on this board have used one layer of cotton batting and another layer of wool batting. W&N is much heavier than Hobbs cotton batting.
    A Good Friend, like an old quilt, is both a Treasure and a Comfort

  3. #3
    Power Poster dunster's Avatar
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    Even though she lives in a cold climate, that doesn't necessarily mean that the interior of her apartment, house, or dorm is cold. I would ask first whether she has trouble keeping warm at night. You can do that without admitting that you're making her a quilt. For warmth, I think I would use one layer of wool rather than two layers of anything else. It's light, and it breathes. Flannel is already heavy, and I'm afraid that adding two layers of W&N would make the quilt very heavy and difficult dry when it is laundered. That might not be as big an issue if you're making a lap quilt, rather than a bed quilt.

  4. #4
    Power Poster PaperPrincess's Avatar
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    I would also recommend wool!
    "I do not understand how anyone can live without one small place of enchantment to turn to."
    Marjorie Kinnan Rawlings

  5. #5
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    Depends on if you are hand or machine quilting. I've hand-quilted 2 layers of W&N and it was not easy. Doable but not an overly fun experience. For me it was for my deal Nana so the pain was worth it. Other's mileage may vary.

  6. #6
    Power Poster Prism99's Avatar
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    I would not use two layers of W&N because of the weight. Some people like heavy quilts, but I don't. I would use a single layer of Hobbs wool batting -- warm but "breathes", light in weight, and gives great definition to the quilting.

  7. #7
    Super Member Bree123's Avatar
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    I wouldn't. I live in Illinois & find one layer of Warm & Natural plenty warm. If you want something thicker, I'd go with Warm & Plush. It's 50% thicker than W&N and is really the thickest thing I can get through my machine. I'm not really sure it's any warmer (maybe -- I can't tell though), but it gives really nice definition to the quilting. Both of those choices have kept me plenty warm on the coldest winter days.

    Otherwise, as others have suggested, Hobb's washable wool is always a good choice. It is super thin but plenty warm.

  8. #8
    Super Member Peckish's Avatar
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    I agree with the others, wool is the way to go. One layer should suffice.

  9. #9
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    There was another thread here recently, discussing the temperature at which people keep their houses. The answers surprised me, and caused me to picture those who posted shuffling around their houses in shorts, tank tops and flip-flops, as the snow pounds against the window. As dunster said, the climate doesn't matter, the temperature of the young lady's housing does. (When I was in college we left our windows open all winter, the dorm was so overheated.) An "ordinary" quilt with cotton front and back, and cotton batting is pretty darn warm.

  10. #10
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    I always put just one layer of W&N in my quilts, and it seems nice and cozy, although I also have a sheet and light blanket on me too. I usually end up in the middle of the night, turning on the ceiling fan -----I am hot blooded.

  11. #11
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    One layer of batting would be warm enough. We live in Madison and I use Hobbs 80/20 and that is nice and comfy. If it is too warm that can cause its own set of problems and then they might not use it as much.

  12. #12
    Super Member Girlfriend's Avatar
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    You could also use a Minky backing. Polyester is naturally warmer. That's what I do when I want a warmer quilt. All cotton just seems to have a natural chill to it, except in the summer.
    Creative clutter is better than idle neatness.

  13. #13
    Power Poster Boston1954's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by dunster View Post
    Even though she lives in a cold climate, that doesn't necessarily mean that the interior of her apartment, house, or dorm is cold. I would ask first whether she has trouble keeping warm at night. You can do that without admitting that you're making her a quilt. For warmth, I think I would use one layer of wool rather than two layers of anything else. It's light, and it breathes. Flannel is already heavy, and I'm afraid that adding two layers of W&N would make the quilt very heavy and difficult dry when it is laundered. That might not be as big an issue if you're making a lap quilt, rather than a bed quilt.
    Dunster has made some very good points. When I get really cold, I just get another quilt to put on top of the other.
    Life is not a movie. No one is going to yell "CUT" when you make a mistake. - Anne L. Fulton

    I am from the South....39 miles south of Boston.

  14. #14
    Super Member mom-6's Avatar
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    I've found when camping that very heavy isn't necessarily warmer. If you look at low temp rated sleeping bags they are very fluffy with thick poly batting.
    However unless your recipient is actually going to be sleeping in a cold room, whatever batting you normally use should work just fine.

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    If you plan to use wool, find out if she's allergic to wool first.

  16. #16
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    I made a flannel quilt - pieced flannel on the front, 80/20 batting inside, and flannel on the back. I free motioned it and it is quite thick/heavy. It's really warm and is my "reading a book" quilt. It would certainly add warmth to a bed. I live in Minnesota so it works here.

  17. #17
    Super Member Snooze2978's Avatar
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    I live in western Iowa and it gets fairly cold here too but I've found one layer of either W & N or Quilter's Dream 70/30 works just fine for me. My mother is 89 now and her bed quilt keeps her nice and warm in the winter.
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  18. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by Boston1954 View Post
    Dunster has made some very good points. When I get really cold, I just get another quilt to put on top of the other.
    Our bedroom is on the west end of a very old house, and when it is really windy out in the winter, it gets colder than the rest of the house. We try to keep that door closed during the day, so it is sometimes quite chilly in there when it is 70 everywhere else. And our house is well insulated.

    We use one light quilt in the summer time, one heavier quilt in spring and fall, and during the winter we have them both on. Two quilts works really well. If we get too hot, one can be tossed off. Occasionally if I'm still cold I can put on my afghan made with worsted weight wool in afghan stitch. Very heavy but not too large.
    Mavita - Square dancer and One Room School Teacher

  19. #19
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    we get pretty cold her in Montana too and I have found that light quilts with lots of loft are the warmest. I can't sleep with a lot of weight on me.
    Lynda

  20. #20
    Super Member Weezy Rider's Avatar
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    It doesn't matter what weight quilt when it's cold. The bed is still cold when you get in. They used to make bed warmers in the days before central heating. After the bed is warm, it's whatever is comfortable. A bed warmer looked like a frying pan with a lid and a long handle. You put warm coals or ashes in it and set it in the bed for a bit.
    Hot water bottles do the same thing.

    I've got an electric blanket under the quilt. It gets turned to low or off when bed is warm.

  21. #21
    Super Member ghostrider's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Weezy Rider View Post
    It doesn't matter what weight quilt when it's cold. The bed is still cold when you get in. They used to make bed warmers in the days before central heating. After the bed is warm, it's whatever is comfortable. A bed warmer looked like a frying pan with a lid and a long handle. You put warm coals or ashes in it and set it in the bed for a bit.
    Hot water bottles do the same thing.
    The modern version is called a husband.
    The Earth without art is just "Eh".

  22. #22
    Senior Member carol45's Avatar
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    I've used Quilters Dream Puff poly batting which they claim is warmer than down. It is so nice to work with and has a very nice feel when finished--high definition on the quilting. I think I would recommend that for maximum warmth, but I'm only trying my first wool batting now, so I don't know how it will compare.

  23. #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by ghostrider View Post
    The modern version is called a husband.
    No wonder the population was so low during Colonial days; the women were sleeping with frying pans instead of husbands.

  24. #24
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    Having lived in a cold climate for many, many years, NH, SD, MA, I can attest that a flannel backing and one layer of Warm & Natural will be sufficient to keep her warm.

  25. #25
    Super Member IBQUILTIN's Avatar
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    Wooll is good, and the bamboo batting is good also.

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