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Thread: Renting a long arm??

  1. #1
    Super Member quiltwoman's Avatar
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    A new quilt shop opened and the are offering time to rent the machine, by apmt, to quilt your quilts. They are offering help w/ set up of quilt on the machine/frame, and economy designs from APQs--you buy the thread, and minimum rental time is 2 hours--what do you think?? worth the while?

    there is a mandatory info session you have to attend and pay for but if it saves lots of time????what do you all think? :?:

  2. #2

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    This sounds great to me......but it depends on how much they are charging for all this time. This is a way to learn to quilt on an long arm and it is a way to decide if you want to invest in your own long arm. :D

  3. #3
    Super Member mary quite contrary's Avatar
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    I would do this depending on the price. I don't want to pay the prices of someone else quilting and the one time I did, I wasn't all that happy with it besides, I like doing things myself.

  4. #4
    Moderator Jim's Gem's Avatar
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    I might be interested in trying it out. Someday I want a longarm too, and working on it for more than just a few minutes at a show would be a good way to see if it is something I want to invest time and money in.

  5. #5
    Senior Member Shelley's Avatar
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    I rent out time on my longarm.

    On the first rental (some places make you take a class), I go through loading a quilt, advancing the quilt, threading the machine, basting the top, sides, and bottom, using the pantos, groovy boards, rulers/ruler base. I hit the basics, then specialize based on whatever the customer wants to do on the quilt. Some places require classes, some don't even allow the rulers (if you hit a ruler, the machine usually has to be re-timed - don't ask me how I know).

    The going rate in these parts is about $10.00/hour with a 4 hour minimum.

    This is a great way to see if LA quilting is for you. Some people try it once, and say forget it!! It's also a great way to try different machines. They all have a different feel.

  6. #6
    Senior Member ddrobins1956's Avatar
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    I wish I could find a shop that did that. I would love to try my hand at quilting my own quilts. I send all of mine out as I find it too frustrating on my regualr machine. I say go for it. How much do they charge?

  7. #7
    Moderator Jim's Gem's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Shelley
    I rent out time on my longarm.

    On the first rental (some places make you take a class), I go through loading a quilt, advancing the quilt, threading the machine, basting the top, sides, and bottom, using the pantos, groovy boards, rulers/ruler base. I hit the basics, then specialize based on whatever the customer wants to do on the quilt. Some places require classes, some don't even allow the rulers (if you hit a ruler, the machine usually has to be re-timed - don't ask me how I know).

    The going rate in these parts is about $10.00/hour with a 4 hour minimum.

    This is a great way to see if LA quilting is for you. Some people try it once, and say forget it!! It's also a great way to try different machines. They all have a different feel.
    It's to bad you are too far for me to come try out your machine. Your price is very reasonable!!! Thanks for information!!!

  8. #8
    Member Lynne's Avatar
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    Julie,

    There is a girl here in my area that has just started providing that type of service. I was talking to my DH last night about going and trying it out. There is a $ for the "how to use it" class and then I think its about $100 for 8 hours. I think that is really reasonable. And, it is a good way for me to see if I really would use a long arm and if I could do that type of thing too.

    I am going to talk to her today about setting up a time to take the orientation class and to schedule time to get on the machine. I will have about 3-4 quilts to do before Christmas. Wish me luck!!

    Lynne

  9. #9
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    wow - i would do that in a heartbeat! can you get a quilt done in 4 hours? i paid $100 each for queen size. that would cut the cost in half, and i think i'd enjoy doing it myself.

  10. #10
    Super Member quiltwoman's Avatar
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    I'm not sure the exact cost per hour--they advertise a smaller quilting machine at $15/hour--2 hour minimum.

    I won't make it back to the shop this week or next, but if I find out, I'll let you know what the going rate is.

  11. #11
    Super Member Marcia's Avatar
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    A quilt shop not too, too far from me is offering classes on a HQ 16. The class size is just 2 people and the price is $100 each. The length of the class is "however long it takes until you are comfortable on the machine." After you have taken the class you can rent the machine for $40/hour, 2 hour minimum. I am going to take the class in January or February and then try my hand at quilting some of my UFOs. IF, and that is a BIG if, I am any good at it, someday I may buy one of my own. But I think this is a great way to try it before I buy.

  12. #12
    Super Member zyxquilts's Avatar
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    I took a long-arm quilting class at a LQS....it cost $60. They rent time on the machine for $20/hour. After you take the class, you can "audit" it as many times as you want, but you aren't allowed to actually work on the machine when you audit. I figured that it would take me 2 or 3 hours just to get my quilt on the machine & set up....then however long to quilt it. We did learn to pin the quilt to the rollers & such, but she barely touched on using pantograph patterns. And what do you do if you're only half done & it's closing time? As you can tell, I was very disappointed with the class & the whole setup. I might try again with a friend who has a machine, but not thru' a shop.

  13. #13
    Moderator kathy's Avatar
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    too bad we're not all closer to Shelly! it's sounds more like she wants people to learn and enjoy the quilting process than to fill her pockets :wink: so here's a pat on the back for you Shelly, and thanks.

  14. #14
    Senior Member Shelley's Avatar
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    We're located in the middle of nowhere. I really want others to have as much fun as I do. I waited a long time to do this.

    We also allow others to come and quilt on the charity quilts that the ladies do on Wednesdays. It's a great way to build techniqe and muscle memory. AND it gets those quilts quilted. Those girls are way too efficient! I think we have about 30 quilts waiting to be worked on. Once I get someone going, it gives me the opportunity to piece on my own stuff, or figure out what to do on a customer quilt. Everyone wins!!!

  15. #15

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    I wish I could try one out. But it would make better sense to me to use the 2 hour trial at the store. It has to be safer than transporting the machine to aomeone's home, setting it up, getting them started, and then have to take it down again in 2 hours and return it to the store for the next quilter. If rented and used in the store, there would be better use of the time rented also. Better for everyone involved.

  16. #16
    Moderator kathy's Avatar
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    the ones I've seen advertised were for using in the store. I doubt if they'd let you take anything that expensive away without a huge deposit, like any other tool rental.

  17. #17
    Power Poster sewnsewer2's Avatar
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    I just started a job learning the longarm. I love it, but I will tell you, it takes time to learn it.

    I say go for it, but don't expect to get a quilt quilted in 2 hours at first.

  18. #18
    Super Member Janstar's Avatar
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    I have rented a Gammill and an HQ at two different shops. All I do is all over meandering and I can finish a king size in 4 hrs. It cost $62 for the king size and they wound the bobbins and told me how to set the quilt up on the rollers. I would go for it, you would be suprised at how you catch on to it and don't forget to BREATH!!!!!!!!!!!! The lady kept telling me that on my first one. Ha Ha!

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