Welcome to the Quilting Board!

Already a member? Login above
loginabove
OR
To post questions, help other quilters and reduce advertising (like the one on your left), join our quilting community. It's free!

Page 1 of 3 1 2 ... LastLast
Results 1 to 25 of 72

Thread: Sandwiching on the floor is HARD.

  1. #1
    Super Member LoisN's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Location
    Hannibal, Missouri
    Posts
    1,267
    Any suggestions on sandwiching quilts without crawling around on the floor. My old knees and back don't appreciate the activity. Therefore, I get the quilt tops made, but can't seem to make myself get them down on the floor to sandwich them for quilting. HELP!!! Any suggestions?

  2. #2
    Piedmont Quilter's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Location
    North Carolina
    Posts
    1,066
    Do you have a church or rec center close by that would let you use their dining tables?

  3. #3
    Super Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2009
    Posts
    5,837
    Blog Entries
    1
    Thats what we do, go to a community center..

  4. #4
    Super Member LoisN's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Location
    Hannibal, Missouri
    Posts
    1,267
    Even on a table, how do you get to the middle of the quilt if it's queen or king size?

  5. #5
    Senior Member AtHomeSewing's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Location
    Pacific NW USA
    Posts
    896
    This free video will demonstrate a way to do it easily, without getting on the floor at all. Hope it helps:

    http://sharonschambernetwork.com/fre...ing/index.html

  6. #6
    Super Member Lisa_wanna_b_quilter's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Location
    The middle of an IL cornfield
    Posts
    7,024
    Blog Entries
    1
    If you've got no choice but the floor, get volleyball kneepads. They help so much you won't believe it. Wal-mart has them for less than $10. Well worth the money.

  7. #7
    Super Member azdesertrat's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    tucson Az
    Posts
    1,124
    or a quilt shop nearby that will let you use their tables when they are not having classes,call and ask.Thats what i do,you might have to schedule a day when its available,so might not be as soon as you want,but its generaly free

  8. #8
    Super Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2009
    Posts
    5,837
    Blog Entries
    1
    we crawl up on the table and sit on our butt, and pin from the center out..the tables hold us..no problem! lol

  9. #9
    Super Member SharonC's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
    Location
    Tucson, Arizona
    Posts
    1,551
    Here's something we discussed on this QB a couple of months ago. Since then I've been basting my lap size quilts on the wall...yep, the wall. I put up a large flannel table cloth on the garage wall, secured with heavy duty (pieces) of velcro and using painter's tape a couple of straight pins for the top (usually 5) I spray basting glue on the back, smooth the backing on till I'm satisfied, then I spray the top portion of the top (seems easier than spraying the batting), and once I have the top portion all smooth I lift up the bottom and spray the bottom.
    Oh, and b/c I'm short I place the top and bottom of the finished quilt sideways when basting on the wall so they are to the left and right (hope that makes sense).
    This usually takes me about 15 minutes (and I'm picky) and it's wonderful...no for horrible back pain!!!
    Hope it helps.
    Sharon

  10. #10
    Senior Member vjengels's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Location
    Colorado
    Posts
    892
    Yes,
    there is a video on U Tube I found one day because I have the same complaint. I typed in hand basting quilt tops, or something similar; what came up was a video using 2 pieces of lumber, I think she used interior trim.... anyway, you starch both the top & back, load the back right side out on one bar, the batting stays loose, unrolled... the top gets loaded on another bar, but right side in. you lay the backing down on your table, unroll it towards you, maybe 18 or so inches, make sure it's smooth. put your batting down on top of that, then start to unroll your top towards you the same amount as the backing, smoothing it out, and making sure it's even... then she did this great harringbone stiitch that kept the sandwich from moving, and it'll stay like that until you're ready to quilt, tomorrow, next year... when ever! I love this method! and I bought a spool of water soluble thread, I don't have to cut out any basting..
    you should take a peak at it. by the way, the size of the quilt you can work on this is only limited by how long your bars, and table are, my husband bought 2 pcs of 8 ft 1x4 and sanded them smooth for me, he even drilled a hole in the end so I can hang them when not in use.
    Good luck

  11. #11
    Moderator Jim's Gem's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Location
    Camarillo, California
    Posts
    35,480
    My husband is on staff at the church we attend. It happens to be practically across the street. He has the keys so we pick a time when it is not busy (hard to do) and push together tables and sandwich on those. He is a great sandwicher!!!

  12. #12
    Super Member Oklahoma Suzie's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2008
    Location
    Home town: Rehoboth, MA Now living in OK
    Posts
    7,897
    Quote Originally Posted by Piedmont Quilter
    Do you have a church or rec center close by that would let you use their dining tables?
    yes, that is what we do, go to the church and pin them.

  13. #13
    Super Member Tiffany's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Location
    Idaho Falls
    Posts
    1,908
    Quote Originally Posted by Lisa_wanna_b_quilter
    If you've got no choice but the floor, get volleyball kneepads. They help so much you won't believe it. Wal-mart has them for less than $10. Well worth the money.
    Now that is a good idea! I hate sandwiching and use the floor, unless my guild is having a sew-in, in which case I use several tables or the floor of my church. Knee pads would really help.

  14. #14
    Junior Member nantucketsue's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Location
    West Yorkshire ,England
    Posts
    228
    Blog Entries
    1
    I can't do it on the floor. My son made me a basting loom from planks of planed wood. It consists of three sides formed into a U shape with hinges (the two sides collapse down when not in use) with slots cut out either side into which I slot planks of wood. The fabric is firmly wound round each plank. The backing goes at the bottom, the middle holds the batting, next the quilt top and the top allows me space to manoeuvre the planks when I need to let the fabric out. It makes life so much easier and I can sit at the dining table (which is extended to accommodate the frame) so it saves my back, my legs and my arms. I attach a diagram so you get the idea. The arrow points to the side on view to show the slant of the notches.

    Diagram
    Name:  Attachment-67551.jpe
Views: 33
Size:  5.1 KB

  15. #15
    Baywatch quilter's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Location
    Niles, MI
    Posts
    132
    Depending on the size... big ones... I borrow a table at my school... but if it is 5 X 6 feet or smaller... I put a June Taylor cardboard cutting board (it opens up that big) on my own small dining room table. The bonus is that you can pin into the board while you baste, put in safety pins... or use spray baste.

  16. #16
    Power Poster MadQuilter's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Location
    ELVERTA, CA
    Posts
    15,274
    Blog Entries
    1
    I took the last one of mine to work and pushed the tables together in the conference room.

    Someone postet a tutorial for sandwiching in quarters. Can't remember who though.

  17. #17
    Super Member Mamagus's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Location
    Newfoundland Canada
    Posts
    1,701
    Quote Originally Posted by AtHomeSewing
    This free video will demonstrate a way to do it easily, without getting on the floor at all. Hope it helps:

    http://sharonschambernetwork.com/fre...ing/index.html
    I wonder is there a way of using her method for spray basting?? Hmmmm....

  18. #18
    Super Member Mamagus's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Location
    Newfoundland Canada
    Posts
    1,701
    Quote Originally Posted by SharonC
    Here's something we discussed on this QB a couple of months ago. Since then I've been basting my lap size quilts on the wall...yep, the wall. I put up a large flannel table cloth on the garage wall, secured with heavy duty (pieces) of velcro and using painter's tape a couple of straight pins for the top (usually 5) I spray basting glue on the back, smooth the backing on till I'm satisfied, then I spray the top portion of the top (seems easier than spraying the batting), and once I have the top portion all smooth I lift up the bottom and spray the bottom.
    Oh, and b/c I'm short I place the top and bottom of the finished quilt sideways when basting on the wall so they are to the left and right (hope that makes sense).
    This usually takes me about 15 minutes (and I'm picky) and it's wonderful...no for horrible back pain!!!
    Hope it helps.
    Sharon
    Hey Sharon.... glad it is working for you! For anyone who missed it here is the post with pictures about half way down:
    http://www.quiltingboard.com/t-28280-1.htm

  19. #19
    Super Member Boston1954's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Location
    East Oklahoma - pining for Massachusetts
    Posts
    8,200
    I am so lucky that we have a quilting group at church and we all take turns using the big tables in the kitchen.

  20. #20
    Super Member shaverg's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Location
    North Carolina
    Posts
    2,011
    I was having the same problem after I broke my leg. I tried the bed and it was too hard to reach across. I bought one of the big cardboard fold out cutting boards from JoAnns and now I put it on my dining room table and extend it by adding a cheap card table I bought at Costco. Sometimes some of the quilt hangs off but it still works, as long as you pull it tight and secure it. You could also use plywood on saw horses and pull it tight with those great big black paperclips.

  21. #21
    Super Member DebraK's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Location
    West Coast
    Posts
    9,194
    Quote Originally Posted by AtHomeSewing
    This free video will demonstrate a way to do it easily, without getting on the floor at all. Hope it helps:

    http://sharonschambernetwork.com/fre...ing/index.html
    These instructions are so worth viewing.

  22. #22
    Super Member SharonC's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
    Location
    Tucson, Arizona
    Posts
    1,551
    Quote Originally Posted by Mamagus

    Hey Sharon.... glad it is working for you! For anyone who missed it here is the post with pictures about half way down:
    http://www.quiltingboard.com/t-28280-1.htm
    It is FANTASTIC. I can't imagine how I had to suffer with back pain (service injury) to put together quilts. This works so great for me :)

  23. #23
    Power Poster sewnsewer2's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Location
    FL
    Posts
    16,684
    Quote Originally Posted by lnordyke
    Any suggestions on sandwiching quilts without crawling around on the floor. My old knees and back don't appreciate the activity. Therefore, I get the quilt tops made, but can't seem to make myself get them down on the floor to sandwich them for quilting. HELP!!! Any suggestions?
    I'm the same way so I bought some knee pads, now I am happier!

  24. #24
    Super Member Minda's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    Central PA
    Posts
    1,618
    Quote Originally Posted by nantucketsue
    I can't do it on the floor. My son made me a basting loom from planks of planed wood. It consists of three sides formed into a U shape with hinges (the two sides collapse down when not in use) with slots cut out either side into which I slot planks of wood. The fabric is firmly wound round each plank. The backing goes at the bottom, the middle holds the batting, next the quilt top and the top allows me space to manoeuvre the planks when I need to let the fabric out. It makes life so much easier and I can sit at the dining table (which is extended to accommodate the frame) so it saves my back, my legs and my arms. I attach a diagram so you get the idea. The arrow points to the side on view to show the slant of the notches.
    This is really interesting, but I don't understand how it works. :oops:
    Could you show us a real picture of it?

  25. #25
    Power Poster BellaBoo's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Location
    Front row
    Posts
    14,661
    Blog Entries
    2
    I bought a no basting quilt frame just to layer and baste my quilt tops. Instead of hand quilting I baste it. I have the Grace EZ no basting frame (bought cheap from a downsizer) and it folds up flat when not in use. I have the extra long rails for it so it fits any size quilt. Before having this I used the Sharon Schamber method, excellent! but that took more room then the frame.

Page 1 of 3 1 2 ... LastLast

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

SEO by vBSEO ©2011, Crawlability, Inc.