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Thread: Seam Rippers

  1. #1
    Super Member clsurz's Avatar
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    Seam Rippers

    Anyone know how many types/brands of seam rippers are out there? Which ones rip/cut better than others!
    cparant

  2. #2
    Super Member gramajo's Avatar
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    I've used the little cheapo Dritz seam ripper for years & really like it. I've tried others & always go back to the Dritz. I have RA & my hands do not work well. The ergonomic ones I've tried are difficult for me to use.

  3. #3
    Power Poster BellaBoo's Avatar
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    I have every brand and some not brands. LOL I like the new surgical blade seam ripper. It's zips through a seam, no picking and cutting single threads. Just be sure and get the blade that has a handle, they are hard to hold without one. Clover regular seam ripper is usually my choice to buy when I find a sale. I discovered that if you buy the hard cushioned handle ripper like Fons and Porter, the handle will quickly remove the cut threads from the seam. I didn't believe it until I tried it. I noticed Walmart has the Dritz ergonomic seam rippers now. Pretty colors too. I woudn't waste my money on the $1 rippers, they aren't sharp enough, you have to tug on the thread to cut it. Many think that is how a ripper is suppose to cut!
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  4. #4
    Super Member Jan in VA's Avatar
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    My preferred seam ripper is from Clover, the Japanese brand....they make such marvelous sewing tools. This ripper, either the round white handled one or the flat brown handled one (cheaper but with the same point and sharpness) has a small, sharp point that fits easily under stitches and a very sharp ripper section. When mine is new, I use it directly along the seam line, between the two layers, and it takes those stitches out like butter. It's great for releasing stitch-by-stitch as well.

    Seam rippers are a relatively inexpensive, necessary tool that should be replaced often -- like blades and needles -- for best results and fatigue relief. I buy them several at a time from Joanne's and LQS when I travel.

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    Super Member paulswalia's Avatar
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    I hear there's one called a "tinkle" - anyone know about this?

  6. #6
    Super Member Peckish's Avatar
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    I think it's a matter of personal preference. I have several different kinds, but the one I go to the most is a simple box cutter blade.

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    I like the skinny pointed nail manicure scissors.

    Truth be told though - I usually use the first one I can find!

  8. #8
    Super Member luvTooQuilt's Avatar
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    I dont like the ergonomic ones- too bulky for me to handle..
    I love the Clover- the brown handle one- usually my go to one first; that is if i can find where I last put it down..
    then my next go to is the /white handled Clover one..
    Ive got a lot of 'Jacks', most ive hated for some reason or another but my clovers I use them the most often..
    Ive got the Ginger 'blade' ones but in all honesty it scares me.. Someone is bound to get wounded with that weapon..
    Dritz has always been 'dull' when ive gotten them; could of been a bad batch perhaps.. Ive got the 2 ergo's and the chunky flat one with a bigger tip.. too big IMHO..
    I have the singer ones you can get at walmart, but again didnt work to well, not sharp enough as my clovers..
    If i see a new one to me ill pick it up if its under 10 bucks just to try it out..
    If its at Joannes Ill pick up with a 50% off coupon if its over 5 bucks....

  9. #9
    Super Member Scissor Queen's Avatar
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    I use these, http://www.amazon.com/Havels-Snip-Ez...6674278&sr=8-3 I never have to worry about them getting dull and slipping and ripping a hole in my work. The point is tiny and will snip the tiniest of stitches.

  10. #10
    Super Member DogHouseMom's Avatar
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    I use the Clover pictured in Jan's post. It's the most comfortable fit I've found. I hate the rippers that come with sewing machines - the one with the cap. If you don't put the cap on the other end of the handle, the handle is too short to hold, and if you do put the cap on the handle it will eventually pop off in your hand while you're ripping. What a pain. The Clover is a good length and width and the business end is sharp and pointy enough to get stubborn small 60wt threads out. As much as you can "enjoy" a seam ripper - I like this one.

    If I have to rip an extra long seam though - like a long border (I shudder to think about it again), I'll use a razor blade. (When I learned to sew as a kid my seam ripper WAS a razor blade). You hold the fabric in your left hand (if you are right handed) with one piece in between my first and second finger (each finger on either side), and the other piece of fabric held in between my thumb on one side pressed against my ring and little finger. I can then hold the two pieces of fabric separated and "pull" them apart while I slice through the stitches with my razor blade and "walk" my fingers down the fabric. I've even known people to hold one piece of fabric with their toes and the other with their left hand and razor blade down the fabric with their right hand.
    Last edited by QuiltnNan; 12-01-2014 at 03:16 AM. Reason: language
    May your stitches always be straight, your seams always lie flat, and your grain never be biased against you.

    Sue

  11. #11
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    The white handled Clover is my favorite. Fine point and very sharp.

  12. #12
    Power Poster BellaBoo's Avatar
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    I use my rotary cutter more then a seam ripper to rip out a seam. It's usually handy and I have never cut the fabric using it. It's like using the surgical blade ripper. I hold the seam apart spread through my fingers and thumb on one hand and slice the seam with the cutter in the other hand. The blade ripper, you use it like a zipper and unzip the seam.
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  13. #13
    Super Member Daylesewblessed's Avatar
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    My mom gave me a battery operated ripper made by Wahl. It looks like a miniature neck clipper. It works great on long seams, but the drawback is that you have to get the hang of holding one piece of cloth up and steadying the other one with the same hand that is holding the ripper. Also, it only works when you can get in between the layers of cloth, so it is not for removing quilting stitches.

    Dayle

  14. #14
    Super Member Neesie's Avatar
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    I recently bought a little cheap one . . . but it's not nearly as sharp, as the cheap ones used to be! My 35 year old seam ripper, that came with my Kenmore, is still sharper than this new one!

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    I usually buy the cheap ones and I buy several at a time. I usually can't find one when I need it. I would rather have a fairly dull ripper so I don't cut my fabric.
    Sue

  16. #16
    Senior Member krysti's Avatar
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    I love my Mighty Bright! I'm not sure if that is the brand name or not, but that's all I could find printed on it. I saw it at Hancock's one day when purchasing some fabric; and they told me to try it. Tried it; loved it, bought it and now it's the only one I use. The things I like about it are it has a magnifying glass on it, a light, and a swivel head! Now I no longer have to put on my extra strong reading glasses when it's time for me to rip out my seams! My new best friend lol
    ​Krysti

  17. #17
    Super Member ghostrider's Avatar
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    I use the one that came with my Viking sewing machine 23 years ago. I don't use it to cut threads, just to lift stitches for a couple inches before I cut that strand off with small scissors, repeating as necessary. I never cut between the fabrics...too messy, too much stress on the fabrics, and too much damage risk. Guess I'm a picker, not a ripper.
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  18. #18
    Power Poster dunster's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by susie-susie-susie View Post
    I usually buy the cheap ones and I buy several at a time. I usually can't find one when I need it. I would rather have a fairly dull ripper so I don't cut my fabric.
    Sue
    I think a dull seam ripper is like a dull knife - you're more likely to press harder and cut your fabric, or yourself. I like the Clover rippers too. I bought the white round handled ones until JoAnn's quit carrying them at my local shop, and then I changed to the brown handled ones, which I found at Fabric Depot. I should buy them by the gross, since I'm always losing them, and goodness knows I need them often enough. I tried the Dritz brand and the points broke off almost immediately.

  19. #19
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    I use the one by Fons & Porter. I don't usually buy into their little gadgets, but this is one I love. It's sharp, the point has a slight angle so you can get under the stitches, even if you've already set the seam, and the handle end is rubber, which works like a charm to brush off the threads ends after you have unsewn the seam.
    -Chris-
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  20. #20
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    I always buy the small rippers by the dozen at Atlanta Thread & Supply. They have the little red plastic ball on the short side. When they get dull, just throw them out! Some times it's the technic used to rip. My Mom always cut a thread every few stitches on the top, then turn the fabric over and cut in between the top cuts on the bobbin thread. When I worked in a children's clothing factory, they were amazed how much quicker they could rip this way.

  21. #21
    QM
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    After more years sewing than I care to count, I have settled on the extra cheap ones from jhittle.com. I almost never cut a whole bunch of threads at one time. If I have a whole seam to do, I cut a thread here and there then pull the opposite one out. Besides being cheap, these blades are very slender, so they go in easily. I treat them like sewing needles, planning on regular replacements. When I go to a guild retreat, I have extras to hand to friends. When my beloved decides to use a ripper to pry something nasty, I can be gracious and say, "Oh keep it, darling."

  22. #22
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    I like the Gingher one and now you can buy refills so that will be great.
    Linda

  23. #23
    Super Member Peckish's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by dunster View Post
    I think a dull seam ripper is like a dull knife - you're more likely to press harder and cut your fabric, or yourself.
    I agree 100% with this - and I HAVE shoved that seam ripper right through the fabric because it was dull and I was pushing too hard!

    I'll use the seam ripper to cut 3-4 stitches, then I use my box knife blade for the rest of the seam.

  24. #24
    Super Member Dolphyngyrl's Avatar
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    I use the ones that came with my brother and babylock machines, they are awesome. I would use my gingher one if I could figure out how to work the dang thing

  25. #25
    Super Member auntpiggylpn's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by susie-susie-susie View Post
    I usually buy the cheap ones and I buy several at a time. I usually can't find one when I need it.Sue
    Me too! This is the one gadget that I can't have too many of. I have a habit of misplacing them, often without moving from my chair! Cheapies and plenty of them!
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