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Thread: Sewing Space

  1. #1
    Junior Member Brandi's Avatar
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    Cool Sewing Space

    Currently I only have my bedroom to sew in. I live with my son and two grandsons, so we don't have any extra rooms or space to use as a sewing/craft room. I am planning on retiring next year and I really want to get into quilting. How many of you have sheds out in your back yard or close to the house? How convenient is it and do you like? I think I would rather be inside the house. I really don't have an option now. I was wondering about a shed out back if that would work. Please give me your suggestions. Thanks. I love to look at all your sewing rooms and I am green with envy. I bought me a new sewing machine and right now the only place I have to put it is at my computer desk.

  2. #2
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    I really only have a sewing nook so I too drool over the beautiful sewing rooms others have. As for a shed, it would depend on how hot and cold it would get. I would think that as long as it was comfortable to sew in and you kept your material inside, it would work.

  3. #3
    Super Member MartiMorga's Avatar
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    I agree the Tartan, a shed would not work here - first it would have to be air conditioned and heated. I think it would be hard to keep moisture from building up in any season. Are you sure you need a computer? Maybe a little lap top for the price of a shed and then the sewing machine will get the "prime spot". Also - don't forget to think about storing up, you know, use the walls not just the floor. Now don't think that moving you sewing machine out to a little table and chair outside on nice days isn't an option.
    God Bless Quilters and Sewers
    Marti

  4. #4
    Junior Member Karenowc's Avatar
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    I used to sew in my family room. I had a great tall cabinet that held the machine and supplies. I put it kiddy corner in the room and closed it up at night when I was finished. You might be able to find something similar at IKEA.
    Karen in CA
    Babylock Ellisimo, Babylock Enlighten Serger, Janome 6600, Janome 760 for travel

  5. #5
    Super Member Gramie bj's Avatar
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    I would love to have a separate building for my sewing, and other crafts. Someplace where if I wanted I could just leave everything out, shut the door and know no one would be dropping something off on my sewing table, or my cutting area until they were going up stairs. They always seam to forget they were stock piling there smaller items where I'm working when they do eventually head up stairs. If you do this make sure you have good heating and air conditioning, It gets really hot and dry in the summer here and really cold here during the winter (not unusual for us to have minus temps for weeks on end).

  6. #6
    Super Member LynnVT's Avatar
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    Hope you can find a space to work, but it doesn't have to be a whole room. I have my sewing things in my living room and clean it up for important company. Sometimes I use the kitchen table and cut on a countertop or a folding table. Where there is a will, there is a way. Is there a closet you could use for your stuff? Most of us are creative about how we work in our hobby, and not everyone has a special room for it. Just keep quilting and you'll figure something out.

  7. #7
    Power Poster PaperPrincess's Avatar
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    I agree with the posters who mentioned A/C and Heating. Without conditioned air, your fabrics and machines would be ruined if you stored them in there. Having said that, I have a nice table in my screened porch. I often take my machine and just sew out there. So you might want to consider storing your fabric and machines indoors and just make a work area in the shed. Take your projects out for the day, then bring them back in when you are done working. Oh, and make sure the electrical service is good.
    "I do not understand how anyone can live without one small place of enchantment to turn to."
    Marjorie Kinnan Rawlings

  8. #8
    Super Member barri1's Avatar
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    I'm in a one bedroom apartment, and I have my stash in sweater boxes up to the ceiling. I share my desk with a lap top, and ironing board. I have my machine in a cabinet. I cut at a small table. It's doable.

  9. #9
    Super Member AliKat's Avatar
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    In a small space with shared housing I would think the most versatile thing would be a sewing machine cabinet with the lift. That way you can roll it to where you want it and yet hide the machine when you want to. I have slept in my 'studio' but slept better when the machine was put away for the night.

    If the weather, electrical capacity, and the air temp/quality is OK maybe the shed could be used for cutting on a larger surface.
    Have fun quilting! If it isn't fun, you will miss a lot.
    ali

  10. #10
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    My first sewing room was an unfinished bathroom in the basement. Had a chest of drawers to hold fabric and notions, peg board above the machine to hold items. Did a lot of sewing in that little space. If you have an option get a single bed so you have a little more space for your machine. It really isn't necessary to have a huge amount of fabric to store - just purchase what you need for a specific project; that will save a lot of space. At least when it is in your bedroom you can close the door when you are finished for the day!

  11. #11
    Power Poster mighty's Avatar
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    I have a double car gargage attached to the house that we converted into my sewing room. I would think that
    a shed would be just fine as long as you would have a way to deep it confortable.

  12. #12
    Super Member paulswalia's Avatar
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    If you have your own bedroom, consider a "MURPHY" bed that you can lift up out of the way during the day and turn your bedroom into a sewing room. There's a post on the quilting board somewhere about a murphy bed - I'll see if I can find it for you.
    We are here to learn how to live in heaven - I'm still learning.

  13. #13
    Senior Member Jennie and Me's Avatar
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    I would love to have a sewing shed, but in this part of the country you'd have to have it heated and cooled and that just isn't cost effective. So, my sewing is all upstairs and takes up 2 bedrooms. It would be nice to have those rooms back as bedrooms, but a girl's gotta do what a girl's gotta do. I really, really want to put a basement under our house and have that as my sewing space, but at our age I'm thinking that it will never happen. Our oldest daughter told us last week that we really need to consider moving into a single level house.(because of health issues)(and age!) Getting old(er) sucks big time. Wish that I had started this sewing adventure earlier in life!

  14. #14
    Super Member paulswalia's Avatar
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    http://www.quiltingboard.com/mission...d-t223360.html Here's the murphy bed solution to sewing in your bedroom.
    We are here to learn how to live in heaven - I'm still learning.

  15. #15
    Junior Member Brandi's Avatar
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    Thanks for your reply. We live in Arkansas so the weather does get very hot and cold. I know I couldn't leave my machine out there and I would certainly have to use and air a heater in the winter. Thanks

  16. #16
    Junior Member Brandi's Avatar
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    I do have a lap top and it is used quite a bit. I was thinking about putting my sewing machine on it and getting a small portable computer table. I do have a lot of crafts, material and scrapbooking stuff. Thanks for all your comments and I will certainly figure it out. I just have too much stuff.

  17. #17
    Super Member Luv Quilts and Cats's Avatar
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    My friend re-did her shed. She added better insulation, a better floor, a better window, a ceiling fan and upgraded the wiring to handle all the electricity of three or four sewers plus iron plus lighting. It's in the shady part of the yard so it only gets really hot in the really hot weather. I have sewed out there in 85 degree weather and with the ceiling fan and another desk fan, it was ok. She looked into putting heating out there, and the cost was more than she could do. But it's good for three seasons anyway. In the winter when we sew we sew at the kitchen table in her house, or she comes to my house. I think if you go the shed route you need to make sure the temperature swings are not too high and low or moisture may be a problem. Do you know anyone you can discuss your ideas with, like a contractor or builder?
    Luv Quilts and Cats
    Never underestimate the healing effects of beauty. - Florence Nightingale

  18. #18
    Super Member gale's Avatar
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    Are you on pinterest? If you look up small sewing spaces or small sewing rooms you can find lots of ideas.

  19. #19
    Super Member carolaug's Avatar
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    I heard the Murphy bed are awesome. I wish we would have thought of that prior to buying a new set for our guest room
    Quote Originally Posted by paulswalia View Post
    If you have your own bedroom, consider a "MURPHY" bed that you can lift up out of the way during the day and turn your bedroom into a sewing room. There's a post on the quilting board somewhere about a murphy bed - I'll see if I can find it for you.

  20. #20
    Super Member Dina's Avatar
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    You can buy a room air conditioner for about $100. or at least we did for a shed out back. The shed has two windows, and the air conditioner sits in one. We also bought a heater thing that we just sit in the corner. It kind of looks like an old fashioned radiator thing. We got both at Wal-Mart.

    The shed isn't my sewing room though. It in inside. But the shed is where my husband builds model airplanes year round. I guess adding electricity would be necessary, but you would need that for light and a sewing machine anyway. He did put some insulation in the walls. It wasn't that much trouble, then just nailed wallboard up.

    I am anxious to hear if anyone has done this, as it makes sense to me. I even half have a memory of someone doing just that, but the memory is years old.

    Dina

  21. #21
    Super Member Dina's Avatar
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    "I bought me a new sewing machine and right now the only place I have to put it is at my computer desk."

    I use my computer desk for my sewing machine, and I put a laptop on the slide out shelf that I used to have the keyboard on...got rid of the big computer. Works really well for me.

    Dina




  22. #22
    Super Member Cybrarian's Avatar
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    To make a shed usable you will probably have to invest a decent amount of money. I would decide what I have to spend and see how I could make it work in the house. A foldable 6 ft table (Sam's and similar stores have them) can be used for significant cutting, ironing, sandwiching etc. and stored when your're done. There are great sewing cabinets with storage (start looking on Craigs List etc and post what you're looking for also. Some great storage options and Ikea is a great spot to shop or for inspiration. There are many good idea books and lots of help in the organizational area here. Maybe start by listing your needs to help you focus as you're gathering ideas. Excited to see what you come up with!

  23. #23
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    I have a sewing shed. I use it for storing fabrics here in New England, where summers can be hot and winters very snowy and cold. My husband custom built it; it is 10x12 --the maximum my city will allow -- and has two lofts. It has a good floor, walls, roof. It sits about 18 inches off the ground on sturdy concrete blocks. No windows. No electricity. He built it for yard stuff but I took it over when a storage space got too expensive. It was not ideal, but was the best I could do. I was quite concerned about the fabrics getting ruined but it's been several years and they are just fine. I have them in banker's boxes and those boxes are each in a big trash bag that is closed with a fabric tie or self ties. Everything is well labeled and each box is in it's place on the shelves, and those spots are also labeled. The deep shelves on the left are for homeless and charity fabrics. That's a 10 foot space, multiple shelves, 8 feet tall. It works well except that there is too much stuff in the middle of the room and that makes it hard to get to the very organized shelves on three sides. Else, I would like to have a cutting table out there. I'd like to clean it out but have had significant issues with a herniated disk and have been in physical therapy for the past three months. I'm in no condition to tackle it for a while. There has been no problem with mice or other critters except the occasional spider.

    I do NOT think the shed would be good for a sewing room and I would not put a sewing machine I cared about out there. There is no heat, but it's kept at least warmer by the fabric insulation. Light comes only from the door. One reason it would not work as a sewing room is that trudging out there in rain, snow, or ice is very difficult for me; I am disabled in addition to the disk problem. So I keep extra projects at the ready in my sewing room and go out there maybe a couple times a month.

    You might check your city's zoning and see it they would allow a shed, what size, with or without electricity, etc.
    Last edited by cricket_iscute; 08-03-2013 at 05:48 PM.

  24. #24
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    I use our bedroom to sew in when we are in texas for winter. Set machine on small drop leaf table, store supplies in stackable plastic boxes, store fabric in long totes under the bed, store cutting mats under dresser. My ironing board is my work table & pressing board. It is compact but it works!

  25. #25
    Senior Member petpainter's Avatar
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    I have a large shed I put in 4 years ago, and it's a great size for sewing. I had the option for electricity, but had no need. The inside walls are wood, so insulation could be put in and portable heat/air units these days are great. There would maybe some times that the weather is too extreme, but only for your comfort. I'd plan on a good $3500.00, but ut would be worth it to have a good to keep always set up and room for stash!
    BTW, I have windows that open and double doors- vinyl siding that matches my house. It's very nice looking.

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