Welcome to the Quilting Board!

Already a member? Login above
loginabove
OR
To post questions, help other quilters and reduce advertising (like the one on your left), join our quilting community. It's free!

Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 1 2
Results 26 to 37 of 37

Thread: Soy or bamboo batting

  1. #26
    Power Poster ckcowl's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Location
    Northern Michigan
    Posts
    12,130
    Blog Entries
    1
    i have used bamboo batting and bamboo fabrics, i love both! very very soft, needles wonderfully washes well (so far) :thumbup: i have not tried the soy yet

  2. #27
    Super Member QuiltswithConvicts's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Location
    Texas
    Posts
    2,811
    Blog Entries
    2
    Did a search for Warm & Natural. This is from the Warm Company site:

    Warm & Natural is the best it's ever been!
    Yes, you can believe your eyes! The nation's leading cotton quilt batting is now better than ever. We've managed to improve on the best and we're grinning from ear to ear. It is easy to see why once you take a look for yourself.

    •Our new ultra-cleaning process extracts a greater percentage of leaves and stems. Virtually unblemished, Warm & Natural batting looks its Sunday best.
    •Our newly refined needlepunch technique better distributes the cotton on both sides of the scrim.
    •Tiny tangles called neps, which once led to dull needles, are nearly eliminated.
    •Warm & Natural needled cotton still uses no chemicals, glues, or resins, so you know that it is gentle enough for even the youngest child.
    Quite a list, especially when you consider how great Warm & Natural cotton quilt batting was to begin with! Strong, durable, unbeatably soft, bright, balanced, clean, and 100% guaranteed. Improved Warm & Natural is as exceptional as it sounds. You are going to love it!
    The same unbeatable standards!

    •Will not separate or bunch
    •Contains no glue or resins
    •Quilt or tie up to 10" apart
    •Will not beard
    •Fabric naturally clings to batting
    •Gives an antique look
    •Now easier to hand quilt
    •Makes an unique exterior fabric
    •Gives character to soft sculpture dolls
    •Dyes easily
    •Keeps its shape wash after wash
    •Ideal for any creative project


    Perfect for your creative projects
    You can see and feel the difference Warm & Natural adds to your artistry. Create magnificent quilts, decorative wall hangings, and wonderful wearable art.

    The batting's durability and versatility also makes it ideal for an exterior craft fabric.

    Use Warm & Natural cotton batting to add character to your soft sculpture creations.

    Try dying, tea and coffee staining, and even painting Warm & Natural to give an antique appearance, add vibrant color or give a unique texture to your dolls.


    The soft, natural cotton goes through a gentle mechanical cleaning to pick out cotton plant and seed remnants. The tiny plant particles that remain lend a special look to crafts when used as an exterior fabric and will not damage your fabric when used in your quilt. Shrinkage will be about 3% with your first washing. Many quilters prefer not to pre-wash to achieve the unique effect created by the slight shrinkage of the batting when the completed quilt is washed. Please follow these directions if you wish to pre-wash your batt:
    1.Hand wash in a basin or tub with a mild detergent. Do not agitate or spin in your washing machine.
    2.Soak for 20 minutes, then rinse several times.
    3.Squeeze water out. Rolling in a towel will help to remove excess water.
    4.Dry in a cool or warm dryer or allow to dry flat.
    Once quilted Warm & Natural cotton batting can be machine washed again and again without fear of separation or bunching.

    100% cotton fibers are punched with hundreds of needles into a strong, thin base material to prevent tearing, shifting or migration.

    The needling process holds the fibers together without glue or resins. The evenly layered fibers stay in place inside your quilt even with generations of washings.


    Warm & Natural is available in 34", 45", 90", and 124" widths by the yard.

    It is also available in the following cut sizes:
    •King Size 124" x 120"
    •Queen Size 90" x 108"
    •Full Size 84" x 96"
    •Twin Size 72" x 90"
    •Baby Size 45" x 60"
    •Craft Size 34" x 45"

  3. #28
    Super Member QuiltswithConvicts's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Location
    Texas
    Posts
    2,811
    Blog Entries
    2
    Part 2 - FAQs:

    Do I need to pre-wash Warm & Natural before I use it?
    You don't need to pre-wash Warm & Natural before using it. However, the batting will shrink approximately 3% the first time it is washed. You will need to pre-wash Warm & Natural if you wish to pre-shrink it. Otherwise your quilt will have a slight "pucker" look that nicely shows off your quilting once it is washed. For more information about care instructions see Warm & Natural page.

    Can I pre-wash Warm & Natural in my washing machine?
    Some people have successfully pre-washed Warm & Natural in their washing machine. However, since the natural cotton fibers have not been chemically treated, we do not recommend machine-washing Warm & Natural before it is quilted. The fibers may cling to each other and pull the batting apart during the spin cycle. Once quilted the fibers are protected by your fabric and you can confidently machine wash your quilts and wearables.

    Will the cotton seeds in the batt stain my quilt?
    Our manufacturing process includes a special cleaning to prevent oil stains from appearing on your quilt. Seed, stem and leaf remnants are mechanically "picked" out of the cotton fiber. The tiny plant particles that give Warm & Natural its character for soft sculpture dolls are quilt friendly.

    Is there a top and bottom side to Warm & Natural?
    Yes. The side with "flecks" (plant and leaf particles) is the top side. The whiter side is the bottom side. If you iron a quilt or wearable made with Warm & Natural, press with the top side toward the iron and make sure your iron is on a low setting. If you make a white quilt consider quilting with Warm & Natural bottom side up.

  4. #29
    Super Member QuiltswithConvicts's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Location
    Texas
    Posts
    2,811
    Blog Entries
    2
    My comment on the above:

    No where do they mention what the "scrim" is made from. Since they keep saying 100% cotton, are we to "assume" the scrim is 100% cotton also?

    I love W&N, both flavors. Never noticed one side whiter than the other. I have noticed that one side is bumpier than the other.

    Years ago, there was a special on one of the TV quilt or craft shows that mentioned how W&N employs mentally challenged individuals - i.e., Down's Syndrome patients. They featured one young man who was so very proud of his work cutting and folding the batts. He made you just want to squeeze the stuffing out of him! So cute.

    I'm lovin' the Thermore batt I put in my Baby Jane quilt. There is so much fabric on the back of those blocks that I didn't want anything of thickness to make the quilting harder. I'm stitching away and love the Thermore. It only comes in queen size, though.

  5. #30
    Super Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2010
    Posts
    4,345
    Quote Originally Posted by QuiltswithConvicts
    My comment on the above:

    No where do they mention what the "scrim" is made from. Since they keep saying 100% cotton, are we to "assume" the scrim is 100% cotton also?
    There is brand here in Germany by "Freudenberg", all their products are available under the name "Vlieseline". They have a cotton batting very similar to the Warm & Natural batting and it's also made with a scrim. Somewhere I read that this material is Polypropylene - a synthetic material. Maybe they use it also for the W&N.

  6. #31
    Super Member vintagemotif's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2010
    Posts
    4,969
    Blog Entries
    10
    Recently, I used Fusi-Boo fusible batting for some small quilts and table runners. First time using a fusible batting for me, so I can't compare it to others fusible battings. I found it easy to work with. I did have to repress from time to time since it pulled away from the fabric (don't know if that was due to my starching the material for piecing). I was able to pick this up at JoAnn's during a sale for 40% off. I would not use this fusible batting for any large projects because of having to repress. I did like the feel and had no problems machine quilting on my vintage Singers.

  7. #32
    Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2011
    Location
    Cambridge UK
    Posts
    4
    Avoid bamboo like the plague. Perhaps I used a cheap one but the bearding was really serious and I'm going to have to vacuum the quilt to try and get it clean!

  8. #33
    Senior Member ellenmg's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Location
    North Carolina
    Posts
    385
    Blog Entries
    2
    I know we started this thread a while back, but I have read up on the process for making bamboo into batting or yarn and it requires nasty chemicals and unfortunately I don't think it is anywhere as eco-friendly and organic cotton....I do want to try the batting made from recycled plastic bottles however.... Bummer about the bamboo....anyone have any other ideas?

  9. #34
    Senior Member ellenmg's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Location
    North Carolina
    Posts
    385
    Blog Entries
    2
    I know we started this thread a while back, but I have read up on the process for making bamboo into batting or yarn and it requires nasty chemicals and unfortunately I don't think it is anywhere as eco-friendly and organic cotton....I do want to try the batting made from recycled plastic bottles however.... Bummer about the bamboo....anyone have any other ideas?

  10. #35
    Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2011
    Location
    Cambridge UK
    Posts
    4
    Just ordered some soy/cotton so will see what that's like. Unfortunately they all have scrim. The bamboo did feel nice and had a lovely drape but...

  11. #36
    Super Member Treasureit's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Location
    OC, CA
    Posts
    2,934
    I use both Bamboo and Warm n Natural and they are similar to work with. I LOVE the smell of the bamboo. It does stick to batiks and make it hard to sandwich...I used a batik backing once...that was a lot of work.

  12. #37
    Super Member annesthreads's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Location
    South Yorkshire UK
    Posts
    1,139
    Quote Originally Posted by Sew Krazy Girl
    Tried bamboo batting and will never use it again. It comes through when pinning or quilting - especially noticeable on dark fabrics. It flies around and gets in your nose and clothes. Yuk! Only advantage is it's very soft. Don't know about warm.
    Quite agree. I'm just finishing a quilt for which I used 50/50 cotton/bamboo. The backing is a plain dark brown and is covered in bits of fluff from the batting, and it's coming through onto the front as well. Terrible stuff - will never use it again.

Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 1 2

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

SEO by vBSEO ©2011, Crawlability, Inc.