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Thread: Threads all over back of flimsy after washing

  1. #1
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    Threads all over back of flimsy after washing

    I washed it, and this is what happened. Do I have to trim all these? I feel like Flik in Ants. Squish me, just squish me now.
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  2. #2
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    I'm not the one to give advice on patchwork, but that is normal. I have never seen quilters use binding or any seam type closing the edge of the fabric. It usually holds up, wash after wash, decade after decade, since there's layers of batting and backing fabric you will not notice. You can always trim the freying thread ends, is it a lot of work?

  3. #3
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    Unless a top is filthy, I quilt it before washing. Since you already have the problem, I would recommend trimming all the strings around your white sections so they don’t show through the quilt after quilting. The strings in the dark sections I would leave. Be careful not to pull and strings while trimming in case you completely fray out the seam allowance.

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    I accidentally posted this to the machine subforum. Thanks for your help.

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    Power Poster feline fanatic's Avatar
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    You should PM a mod and ask them to move the topic for you.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Tartan View Post
    Unless a top is filthy, I quilt it before washing. Since you already have the problem, I would recommend trimming all the strings around your white sections so they don’t show through the quilt after quilting. The strings in the dark sections I would leave. Be careful not to pull and strings while trimming in case you completely fray out the seam allowance.
    I washed it because I got a spot wet, and the purple glue stick got purple again, and it freaked me out, lol. Also, its made from plaid shirts, and there were a few pieces that were a bit dodgy, and i was afraid they'd split at a seam when it was washed, and I wanted to know before I did all the work of quilting it. Also, I did a stupid thing when I removed some spots, and i was afraid there may have been a remaining piece of the white fabric that was still affected by the stupidity which would have made a hole after washing. So, it was mostly to check that the patchwork was in good enough shape to go on to the next step.

    OK, I know you're all going to ask, so here's the doltish maneuver: I has some rust spots I wanted to see if I could get out, so I used some CLR bathroom cleaner. It's an acid, what could go wrong, right? Also, I'm sure I didn't rinse it out well enough, and when I pressed one of those spots, which had indeed disappeared, by the way, the was a scorched spot. Uh, oh... And when I scratched the spot, it disintegrated. Yeah, that's definitely gonna leave a mark, right?

    Well, you know they say we learn our best lessons from our mistakes. It seems to be working for me...

  7. #7
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    I’d put it on the batting and see if a lot of the darker strings show through the lighter blocks. If they do, I’d try to remove as much as possible and at least trim some of the longer ones.
    If I'm too busy to quilt, something else has to go.

  8. #8
    Power Poster ckcowl's Avatar
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    Unfortunately you do need to trim them all. You should never wash a quilt top before sandwich, quilted and bound.
    hiding away in my stash where i'm warm, safe and happy

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by themadpatter View Post
    I washed it because I got a spot wet, and the purple glue stick got purple again, and it freaked me out, lol. Also, its made from plaid shirts, and there were a few pieces that were a bit dodgy, and i was afraid they'd split at a seam when it was washed, and I wanted to know before I did all the work of quilting it. Also, I did a stupid thing when I removed some spots, and i was afraid there may have been a remaining piece of the white fabric that was still affected by the stupidity which would have made a hole after washing. So, it was mostly to check that the patchwork was in good enough shape to go on to the next step.

    OK, I know you're all going to ask, so here's the doltish maneuver: I has some rust spots I wanted to see if I could get out, so I used some CLR bathroom cleaner. It's an acid, what could go wrong, right? Also, I'm sure I didn't rinse it out well enough, and when I pressed one of those spots, which had indeed disappeared, by the way, the was a scorched spot. Uh, oh... And when I scratched the spot, it disintegrated. Yeah, that's definitely gonna leave a mark, right?

    Well, you know they say we learn our best lessons from our mistakes. It seems to be working for me...
    Thanks for sharing your list of boo-boos. I, too, have had to learn the hard way sometimes and you made me laugh with your progression! Definitely some things I would have considered doing. I'd say trim only the threads that will show against the white and move on. You've learned a lot and need a win now! It will be a lovely quilt with all of those plaids.

  10. #10
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    I'd pick a comfortable chair and trim all those little threads, being very careful to not cut a hole in any of the pieced quilt. I would probably press it first, so everything is laying flat, but not really sure about that.

    Edited to add: I am ADD about trimming all those extra threads when just doing piecing, much less, if I had to wash the top before it was quilted. I quilt my own quilts on a longarm and have had to unroll to trim a thread when I could see it through the batting.
    Last edited by Barb in Louisiana; 09-16-2018 at 04:12 PM.
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  11. #11
    Power Poster Onebyone's Avatar
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    You have a mess for sure. It can be fixed but will take time and patience to cut all the dark threads away from the white.
    I believe giving what I can will never cause me to be in need.
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  12. #12
    Super Member quiltingshorttimer's Avatar
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    yes, trim the threads. Now you know to quilt first before washing. I'd also suggest you check to make sure no seams opened up in the washing too.

  13. #13
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    Sorry you are having problems with your quilt. The long seams could be folded back. Lay a long ruler over them keeping the 1/4 inch seam and trim with rotary cutter.

    The piece that disintegrated can be carefully removed and replaced with a new piece.

    best wishes rescuing your quilt.

  14. #14
    Power Poster Jingle's Avatar
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    Exactly why I would never wash a quilt top until totally finished, no matter what.
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  15. #15
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    The quilt actually looks like it held up quite well. I concur that you need to trim any threads that might show on the white, which means most of them. Press it carefully from the back, then the front.

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    FYI- I'm trimming it with scissors or nippers in one hand and the vacuum cleaner hose in the other. If I've got to clean the Aegean stables, I may as well share the data from the research. Experimented with using electric hair clippers, which worked well, but it was really easy to accidentally clip a seam allowance. Hahaha, now that's rubbing salt in an open wound.

    I'm just a little less than half done.

  17. #17
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    Good luck with your trimming. Been There, Done That.

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    If your schedule allows, just take it a little at a time.
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    I would trim all the threads - you'll feel better, it will look better, and quilt better. Beautiful plaids - it will be a beautiful quilt!

  20. #20
    Super Member KalamaQuilts's Avatar
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    I have a top from the late 1800's that I washed. I wish I could have seen the look on my face when I realized what I'd done. I get it out about every 5 years and work on trimming and pressing.

    One totally fun thing you could do is quilt it that side up, just press it good so it lies flat.
    A one of a kind rag quilt. Quilt it about 2" apart. Straight line quilting would go great with a service quilt!

  21. #21
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    I know you've already had enough tears for this -

    But are you sure that you rinsed that top thoroughly? I am wondering about that CLR being destructive to the fabrics?

    I have also washed an unquilted top - one of my cats peed on it. I pressed it from the back and the top and then the back again. That was definitely a challenge. Then I laid it on the ironing board and clipped the threads row by row.

    I have also learned to not use anything I consider iffy as to durability. I am in the wash-before-cutting group, so if I get a bleeder, I will not use that either. (It goes in the waste basket if I am unable to return it - I will not put it in a donation pile for some other person to have a headache/heartache.)

  22. #22
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    Oh my, why did you wash it before it was done? get those little scissors out and get rid of all the strings.

  23. #23
    Senior Member Cheshirepat's Avatar
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    I really sympathize with the 'just squish me' moments! It's pretty human to pull those sometimes... I agree with being very sure the fabric is now clear of any 'spot removers' (cough) and just moving on to see what *really* needs to be trimmed or not. Throw it over the batting and look from the front. Of course you've checked for any weak spots, I'm sure. Wishing you the best of luck finishing - it looks like it will be lovely and snuggly when finished! I'm longing to do a plaids quilt this fall as well.
    *this space for rent*

  24. #24
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    I would trim all strings, not just in the white areas. It will not take that much longer AND you will be able to make sure ALL seams are secure and have not frayed loose during the wash.

  25. #25
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    Good luck. Been there done that. I'm sure it will be a gorgeous quilt when you are finished. Don't get discouraged, I've completely removed a whole quilted quilt. Didn't like it after it was quilted so undid all the hours of quilting. Clipping threads will be easier! Yes we understand!
    SEW MUCH FUN!

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