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Thread: Threads to use

  1. #1
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    Threads to use

    Hi everyone sorry but what sort of thread should I use for quilting with the machine, some have told me that I have to use special thread, and some have told me that normal thread is ok, what is the normal thread.

    Idle Di

  2. #2
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    I don't think that there is a just for machine quilting thread. I like Aurifil 40 or 50 wt, but when I need a certain color and I don't have it I have used serger thread. Aurifil is 100% cotton and other thread that I have used are poly.

    Your machine needs to like the thread that you are using because there are some quilting threads that my machine does not like, like Signature.. it just some breaks and shreds. You need a good thread that will last as long as the quilt does. This is just me, and not the quilt police. hehe
    Last edited by mamagrande; 05-06-2017 at 08:20 PM. Reason: typos

  3. #3
    Power Poster sewbizgirl's Avatar
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    I use 40 weight thread (tex 40), and most of what I have is either American and Efird or the thread that Connecting Threads sells. There are higher quality threads that may perform a little better (less linty) but I can't afford them!

    If you have to buy thread locally, like from your Joanne's store, try the Gutermann they carry. They often have their thread on sale for 'buy one, get one free'. Do NOT try to quilt with the Maxi Lock cone threads. They are of lesser strength and quality and are only meant to be used in sergers.

    Some of the fancier threads are only meant for embroidery machines... so watch out for that too.

    Aurifil is a very nice, higher quality thread that quilting shops carry... but it's too pricey for me, too.
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  4. #4
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    Oh thank you I do use the Gutermann and find they are great, but have never used any other

    Idle Di

  5. #5
    Super Member Stitchnripper's Avatar
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    If your machine is happy you can use any thread you want.
    Alyce

  6. #6
    Super Member Snooze2978's Avatar
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    I'm sure there's a rule about it but I use what my machine likes best and gives me the best results. So far my machine likes aurifil, Connecting Threads cottons and polyesters, metallic embroidery thread by BFCreations. And just now finished a friend's quilt using Glide thread. Broke only once and I'm sure it was because i did something stupid and not the machine's fault. I know not to use serger threads or that's what I've been told not to use.
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    Are you talking about just FMQ or putting the pieces together. I use Aurifil for all, I love the low shred and its strong. For piecing, I use either a tan, a natural color for everything because it won't be seen. I also like it for FMQ because its strong and will hold up but use different colors depending on the fabric.
    Judy

  8. #8
    Power Poster Homespun's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Stitchnripper View Post
    If your machine is happy you can use any thread you want.
    this is my rule. If the machine likes it, sew on!
    Retired teacher, loving it.
    Love quilting also.

  9. #9
    Power Poster Onebyone's Avatar
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    It's not just the thread type it's the needle size and type you use with different threads too. It took me a long time to understand thread wt, ply and type was important to the needle size. Superior Threads has the recommended needle size for each type of thread on their website. Lots of thread education there for free. I use machines needles from Superior. They are Organ needles, the best in the sewing world.
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  10. #10
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    most of my thread is Coats & Clark but I also don't use a long arm. I hand embroidery so use DMC floss mostly fro that. I would agree to use what your machine likes and the needle size.

  11. #11
    Senior Member crashnquilt's Avatar
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    Well I will probably be raked over the coals here. I use MAXI LOCK a lot! I love using it for piecing and I also use it for quilting. When using for piecing I use an embroidery needle in my machine usually a 10 or 12. If I use MAXI LOCK for quilting on my domestic machine I use size 14 top stitch.
    I have also used embroidery thread for quilting on my domestic using 14 top stitch.
    Most of the time if you are having a problem with a thread, it is not the thread but the needle is the problem. The reason I switch to a 14 top stitch needle is to reduce reflection of the needle. Top stitch has a larger and stronger shaft. When free motion quilting, the needle gets "bent" or curved while moving the fabric. With a regular needle it can deflect or reflect against the hole in the needle plate creating an uneven stitch or break. Also the top stitch needle has a larger eye giving the thread a bit more room to move.
    I am not one to rule out any type of thread to use until I have exhausted ALL possibilities. Things to try are:
    Adjust tension
    Change thread path (skip a thread guide going to the tensioner)
    Change needle size and type
    Use thread net on spool
    Flip the spool over
    Use spool cap
    Remove spool cap
    Hope this helps
    Crashnquilt


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  12. #12
    Power Poster feline fanatic's Avatar
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    There are so many beautiful different threads on the market that it is a shame to limit yourself to only a few. There are loads of piecing threads that are just fine to use. There are no hard and fast rules, except as pointed out before you must use the right needle and tension adjustments for the thread you are using. I prefer a finer thread for piecing so I have an easier time of lining up points and intersecting pieces. Additionally you can use a different thread in the bobbin then you do in the top (for both piecing and quilting). You should experiment. Go to a big quilt show that has lots of vendors and buy different kinds or go to Superiors site and order a bunch of "try me" spools. They usually have "try me" specials on almost every thread at a discounted price. But you can't choose the color, they will.

    For piecing, my usual combo is Aurifil 50 wt 2 ply cotton in the top and Bottom line 60 wt poly in the bobbin.

    For machine quilting on my longarm I have used clear monofiliment (both a polyester and a nylon), metallic, holographic, embroidery (40 wt poly usually), cotton, everything from super fine 100wt silk and polyester to super heavy 12 wt cotton with fantastic results. Oh and I have used numerous types of thread on a single quilt.

    One time I used a rayon variegated thread in my domestic to quilt a child's quilt. It seemed to work fine. I have since found out that rayon is notoriously weak and often not colorfast. I donated the quilt to charity so I have no idea how it held up. But since learning that I don't use rayon but others have used it with no issues at all. It all depends on the look you are going for and the application.

    Here are some variables to consider when choosing the thread for quilting your quilt.

    Is the quilt an art quilt, a utility quilt, a fancy show quilt, a table topper that will be removed when the table is in use or placemats and table topper/runner that are meant to take a lot of use, hot dishes, spills and abuse, or maybe it is a wall hanging that will never be washed with lots of embellishments.

    How much stress will be on the quilt? A child's drag around quilt that is washed a lot will take a lot more abuse than bed quilt that goes in the guest bedroom and is only used occasionally and washed infrequently.

    Do you want the quilting to stand out, play an equal role or just hold things together with very little or no visible texture?

    How long do you want the quilt to last? Are you hoping it will last a very long time and maybe be passed down to children or grandchildren or do you not care and when it wears out you will simply make another?

    What kind of batting did you use? How far apart can you space the quilting and will the quilt still hold up and look nice if you quilt the minimum amount needed? (That will need a much stronger thread)

    Before choosing a thread for quilting you should consider all these variables and then make your selection.

  13. #13
    Power Poster ckcowl's Avatar
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    I machine quilt with the thread that works best for my project, cotton, polyester, silk, invisible, heavy, fine, verigated, solid, what ever my machine likes & I like for the quilt I'm quilting.
    hiding away in my stash where i'm warm, safe and happy

  14. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by sewbizgirl View Post
    Do NOT try to quilt with the Maxi Lock cone threads. They are of lesser strength and quality and are only meant to be used in sergers.

    I know not to use serger threads or that's what I've been told not to use. (Snooze)

    Some of the fancier threads are only meant for embroidery machines... so watch out for that too.

    Aurifil is a very nice, higher quality thread that quilting shops carry... but it's too pricey for me, too.
    I use serger thread all the time. When an item is serged, one or two threads are straight in the seam. The other threads are looped. The straight threads need to be strong.

    Serger thread seems lighter weight because it is two strands, whereas most sewing thread had three strands. Aurifil has only two strands as well, and is also a thinner thread. You can get way more on the bobbin with that.
    Mavita - Square dancer and One Room School Teacher

  15. #15
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    I use serger thread almost all the time, especially if it is a project that I can use my basic white, cream or gray. I've had no problem with it at all and I don't run out as often. It seems to be strong enough for piecing the projects I do. If I were quilting for competition, I might think differently but my quilts are for using or hanging on a wall at home. Whatever you choose is good. Maybe use up some "old" stuff as long as it passes the test of pulling on it between your hands--it works for piecing. (Will be inside and nobody knows.)

  16. #16
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    Unless you are entering a show, there isn't a thread you must use for quilting. What do you like? what does your machine like? Sometimes using a clear nylon thread works because you do not want any color to show. (Caution, do not use with a child's quilt. If it comes loose, it will create a toe or finger hold and can hurt the child.) Sometimes a variegated thread is nice because of the subtle color changes. Sometimes you want the bold look of a contrasting color. Note that I have not mentioned the type of thread - that is your preference. Over time we have all found the type or brand of thread we prefer. Only thing I would say NOT to use is very cheap thread or old thread you found in your mother's or grandmother's sewing basket. That old cotton thread is weak and very linty.

  17. #17
    Super Member fivepaws's Avatar
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    [QUOTE=Idle Di;7818807]Hi everyone sorry but what sort of thread should I use for quilting with the machine, some have told me that I have to use special thread, and some have told me that normal thread is ok, what is the normal thread.

    I believe that Superior Threads makes a thread that says machine quilting. Check them out. Most of the time I just use regular thread. It is a lot cheaper.
    All my grand-children have paws.

  18. #18
    Junior Member Sheep Farmer's Avatar
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    For basic machine quilting I just use any cotton 40wt thread (as long as my machine likes it).
    Sheep Farmer by day ~ Learning to Quilt by night

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