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Thread: turning tote/purse straps

  1. #26
    Super Member Tinabodina's Avatar
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    I always stitch in a piece of material or string that I can get my fingures on and pull. I used to use a pencil, but since Mr. Author decided to move into my hands, I had to find a different way.

  2. #27
    Super Member featherweight's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by noahscats7
    I make them similar to binding,fold in half & iron then open & iron both sides to the middle. Then I top-stitch both sides.
    This is what I do also. I like the easiest way possible and this works for me... :thumbup:

  3. #28
    Senior Member Charleen DiSante's Avatar
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    I like the fold and stitch method too, especially since the patterns usually call for batting (or in some cases I have used heavy twill tape to avoid the puffiness) I had no luck in getting the 1 to 1/2 inch wide straps turned.

  4. #29
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    Quote Originally Posted by alikat110
    Stitch with small gauge cord inside, slightly longer than strip. baste stitch to one end, then pull through. Remove basting
    I have done this for years. If straps or bands are too narrow to attach a cord to the end seam, then I don't sew wrong sides together. I fold over the hem edge, iron, pin, and top stitch.

  5. #30
    Super Member joysewer's Avatar
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    I have the Fasturn tubes and wouldn't live without them!!

  6. #31
    Super Member Stitchnripper's Avatar
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    I use the fold and stitch method too. It is bulky but gives a nice result. My dinky Brother mechanical seems to sew through anything with no problems.

  7. #32
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    I never need to turn the straps for a tote bag. I cut the strip whatever length you want it, for a 2.5 inch strip, cut the strip 5 inches wide. Make a mock bias tape )fold in half, press then turn under raw edges, press then sew on raw edge side the length of the strip, the on the folded side of the strip, then sew down the middle of the strip. Always use a light weight fusible batting the length of the strip minus 1/2 inch. I also use this method for a braded handle. That takes 3 time as much fabric, but very pretty and seems to last longer. No need to use batting in this method.

  8. #33
    Super Member SewExtremeSeams's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by waladopa
    Hey, that is a very clever idea! My DH could make something similar out of wood. Thanks! :-D

  9. #34
    Senior Member Charleen DiSante's Avatar
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    Rettie V Grama:
    Thanks for the tip on the braided handles lasting longer.

  10. #35

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    Diaper safety pin

  11. #36
    Junior Member Beebonnet's Avatar
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    I use batting inside the straps, cut a little less than half the width. Press together down the center-right side up. Press 1/4 inch in on both sides or leave the selvage edge on one side and press the other side. Now bring the selvage edge over, then the other side lapped over that. Pin. Sew narrowly along each side of the strap and sometimes down the middle. The batting gives them firmness and softness all at the same time. I have never minded the look of stitched straps. So much easier.

  12. #37
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    I do it this way and add a stiff batting strip before sewing

  13. #38
    Senior Member mariebaker's Avatar
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    Stitch with small gauge cord inside, slightly longer than strip. baste stitch to one end, then pull through. Remove basting

    thanks Alikat110-

    what a great idea. :-D

    Also, I've seen Eleanor Burns use a hemostat-

  14. #39
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    Quote Originally Posted by lindasidlow
    I fold the strip in half, press, open up, bring each raw edge to the crease mark, press, then fold in half then topstitch down both sides. I usually put a piece of webbing under the folded edges. I don't like turning a tube right side out. This method also has more layers making it stronger and wear longer.
    Ditto for me except I don't usde the webbing. I place fusible batting inside.

  15. #40
    Senior Member Dottie Bug's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by lindasidlow
    I fold the strip in half, press, open up, bring each raw edge to the crease mark, press, then fold in half then topstitch down both sides. I usually put a piece of webbing under the folded edges. I don't like turning a tube right side out. This method also has more layers making it stronger and wear longer.
    :thumbup: :thumbup: :thumbup:

  16. #41
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    After I once did straps this way, I have never returned to turning long pieces of sewed straps. It makes it sooooo much easier and not so frustrating--to say nothing of the time it saves!

  17. #42
    Senior Member Sallyjane's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jazzmyn
    They make a "turning tool" you can usually get it at most places that sell sewing things...forget what it is called for sure. Bought mine many years ago....don't know even where it is at or I would tell you the name of it. Sorry.
    When I didn't have the "turning tool" I would just take the strip and press the sides down and put the strip together and do a top stitch...NO need to turn the strips....works fine, chances are you are going to do a top stitch after you turn the strip anyway.
    I do own the turning tool, but end up doing it just like you said. I almost always use fusible web or regular webbing to make the hand sturdier.

  18. #43
    Senior Member Sallyjane's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by JanetM
    Yes, this is what I have too. But I still prefer the folding method.

  19. #44
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    Quote Originally Posted by lindasidlow
    I fold the strip in half, press, open up, bring each raw edge to the crease mark, press, then fold in half then topstitch down both sides. I usually put a piece of webbing under the folded edges. I don't like turning a tube right side out. This method also has more layers making it stronger and wear longer.
    That's what I do also. I hate to turn handles unless they have cording in them, then I use a "Fast to Turn". It's has 3 different size tubes to pull strap through or push through.

  20. #45
    Member RamblingRose's Avatar
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    I use the long hard plastic handle that opens my window shades , works great. And sometimes I use the same as Alikat 110 this method also works great.

  21. #46
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    great idea!

  22. #47
    Super Member montanajan's Avatar
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    I've used several methods -
    * do not turn - top stitch both edges down the length - no need to turn
    * large safety pin - kept 1 of our kids' diaper pins, pin to 1 end after sewing, pull through to turn tube
    * fold down length, press, fold edges to center, press again, topstitch
    * long metal BBQ skewer
    Good luck.

  23. #48
    Super Member gmaybee's Avatar
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    I have the Fasturn set. They have different sizes in the set for turning spaghetti straps to big purse straps. They are pricey, but it is a tool you will have forever. I make a lot of totes and purses and love the Fasturn for turning.

  24. #49
    Senior Member katcox's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by lindasidlow
    I fold the strip in half, press, open up, bring each raw edge to the crease mark, press, then fold in half then topstitch down both sides. I usually put a piece of webbing under the folded edges. I don't like turning a tube right side out. This method also has more layers making it stronger and wear longer.

  25. #50
    Junior Member katzak's Avatar
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    I turn my straps using a long knife sharpener. The end is rounded and won't tear the fabric. Works great.

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