Welcome to the Quilting Board!

Already a member? Login above
loginabove
OR
To post questions, help other quilters and reduce advertising (like the one on your left), join our quilting community. It's free!

Page 1 of 4 1 2 ... LastLast
Results 1 to 25 of 78

Thread: turning tote/purse straps

  1. #1
    Member jslovak's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Location
    Bath, NY
    Posts
    14
    Does anyone have a good trick or use a good tool for turning strips for tote pages/purse handles right side out?

  2. #2
    Senior Member katiescraftshop's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Location
    Upstate New york
    Posts
    521
    I use a big (turtle) diaper safety pin and do it the old fashioned way.

  3. #3
    Super Member sweetpea's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Location
    southeast Kansas
    Posts
    1,463
    this is what works best for me as well.
    Quote Originally Posted by katiescraftshop
    I use a big (turtle) diaper safety pin and do it the old fashioned way.

  4. #4
    Power Poster alikat110's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Location
    Waco, Texas
    Posts
    15,217
    Blog Entries
    9
    Stitch with small gauge cord inside, slightly longer than strip. baste stitch to one end, then pull through. Remove basting

  5. #5
    Super Member Jazzmyn's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Location
    New Mexico
    Posts
    4,245
    They make a "turning tool" you can usually get it at most places that sell sewing things...forget what it is called for sure. Bought mine many years ago....don't know even where it is at or I would tell you the name of it. Sorry.
    When I didn't have the "turning tool" I would just take the strip and press the sides down and put the strip together and do a top stitch...NO need to turn the strips....works fine, chances are you are going to do a top stitch after you turn the strip anyway.

  6. #6
    Super Member snipforfun's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Posts
    1,971
    Blog Entries
    8
    I fold the strip in half, press, open up, bring each raw edge to the crease mark, press, then fold in half then topstitch down both sides. I usually put a piece of webbing under the folded edges. I don't like turning a tube right side out. This method also has more layers making it stronger and wear longer.

  7. #7
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Location
    Halls Cross Roads, TN
    Posts
    944
    Blog Entries
    133
    I make them similar to binding,fold in half & iron then open & iron both sides to the middle. Then I top-stitch both sides.

  8. #8
    Power Poster nativetexan's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Location
    home again, after 27 yrs!
    Posts
    15,778
    Blog Entries
    2
    oh i love Alikat's great idea!!!

  9. #9
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Location
    Florida
    Posts
    880
    Blog Entries
    82
    Although I have tube turners, it's much easier to do the methods mentioned above. Plus, the result is much nicer.

  10. #10
    Power Poster PaperPrincess's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
    Location
    Michigan
    Posts
    10,464
    Blog Entries
    2
    I like my fasturn set. Got it at a garage sale. I like that I can manipulate the seam so it's open and lays flat.

  11. #11
    Super Member lynnsim's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    Location
    Texas
    Posts
    1,506
    When I started sewing tote straps again, I decided I didn't want to do any of that turning. So, I do the methods described above. Haven't had any problems....

  12. #12
    Super Member quiltinggirl's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Location
    Wichita, KS
    Posts
    4,101
    I simply use a wood skewer rod. They are very slim and will work with anything, plus they are very inexpensive. I like to use this as a tool when I am making the tie strings on flannel pj bottoms. :)

  13. #13
    Super Member Dina's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Location
    Texas
    Posts
    5,060
    I never even thought of not turning the strap. I certainly will from now on!! Great idea!!

  14. #14
    Super Member Jennifer22206's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2010
    Location
    state of confusion
    Posts
    4,775
    Blog Entries
    4
    I use stamp tongs. :) They work awesome for me

  15. #15
    Banned
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    Location
    Hooker, Oklahoma
    Posts
    363
    Blog Entries
    1

  16. #16
    Super Member QuiltnLady1's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Posts
    4,381
    I prefer not turning them -- a lot of hassle and I prefer to add a bit of batting to the straps so I do the fold over and run several lines of stitching.

  17. #17
    Super Member JanetM's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Location
    At my LQS
    Posts
    2,355

  18. #18
    Super Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2010
    Posts
    3,386
    Quote Originally Posted by lindasidlow
    I fold the strip in half, press, open up, bring each raw edge to the crease mark, press, then fold in half then topstitch down both sides. I usually put a piece of webbing under the folded edges. I don't like turning a tube right side out. This method also has more layers making it stronger and wear longer.
    Yup, I do the folded method too, so then they don't have to be turned. It's much quicker for me.

  19. #19
    Super Member LivelyLady's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
    Location
    Western MA
    Posts
    2,680
    I use a tube turner that I purchased several years ago....love it!!

  20. #20
    Senior Member Jo Belmont's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Location
    Reno, Nevada
    Posts
    656
    Quote Originally Posted by lindasidlow
    I fold the strip in half, press, open up, bring each raw edge to the crease mark, press, then fold in half then topstitch down both sides. I usually put a piece of webbing under the folded edges. I don't like turning a tube right side out. This method also has more layers making it stronger and wear longer.
    Yep. This is my method too. Much stronger and accurate and a whole lot less frustrating.

  21. #21
    Super Member jitkaau's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2010
    Location
    Australia
    Posts
    4,119
    I don't bother to turn it. I fold it with right sides out and top stitch down the edges to hold the layers together. Faster and neater that way.

  22. #22
    Super Member Arleners's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Location
    Stony Brook, NY
    Posts
    1,213
    Quote Originally Posted by alikat110
    Stitch with small gauge cord inside, slightly longer than strip. baste stitch to one end, then pull through. Remove basting
    Holy Moley! That is the best idea I ever heard for turning! My fingers and my patience thank you.

  23. #23
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Posts
    138
    Quote Originally Posted by alikat110
    Stitch with small gauge cord inside, slightly longer than strip. baste stitch to one end, then pull through. Remove basting
    This is what I do, also ... very useful for small things like spaghetti straps. It works a peach!

  24. #24
    Senior Member Jo Belmont's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Location
    Reno, Nevada
    Posts
    656
    Quote Originally Posted by sewobsessed1
    Quote Originally Posted by alikat110
    Stitch with small gauge cord inside, slightly longer than strip. baste stitch to one end, then pull through. Remove basting
    This is what I do, also ... very useful for small things like spaghetti straps. It works a peach!
    What a great idea!

  25. #25
    Super Member Connie in CO's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Location
    Canon City, Colorado
    Posts
    2,438
    Blog Entries
    2
    Quote Originally Posted by jslovak
    Does anyone have a good trick or use a good tool for turning strips for tote pages/purse handles right side out?
    I just turn the edges into the middle then fold over then sew.Connie in CO

Page 1 of 4 1 2 ... LastLast

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

SEO by vBSEO ©2011, Crawlability, Inc.