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Thread: Unthreading Your Sewing Machine TIP

  1. #1
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    Unthreading Your Sewing Machine TIP

    Did you know there is a right way and a wrong way to take the thread out of your sewing machine? My brother - in - law was in the garment industry as a sewing machine repairman for over 40 years and he just told me this. To take your spool of thread off of your machine, cut it off at the spool and then pull the thread out from the needle. You should never pull the thread out in the opposite direction that it is threaded. I never knew this!

  2. #2
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    I just learned this when I got my new janome. Not exactly sure why, so I try to do it this way and sometimes, I forget and jerk it out the old way.

  3. #3
    Junior Member bobbiesboutique's Avatar
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    How come? Ive always pulled it out wrong I hope I havent messed something up thank you for the info!

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    Exactly. I learned that in HS some 40+ (Whew!) years ago. The tension can get totally messed up pulling it out backwards, not to mention the lint that is carried back into the mechanisms. And, never hand turn the flywheel away from you, always toward you. The timing can get out of whack if the backward turning is a habit. The belts are meant to run in a forward motion. My sister's sewing machine flywheel locked up because of this. (We had the same Home Ec teacher. One of us was paying attention in class. LOL)

  5. #5
    Super Member ghostrider's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by NanaCsews2 View Post
    The belts are meant to run in a forward motion.
    So how does the machine manage to sew in reverse??

    I've unthreaded a wide variety of sewing machines in the many decades since I first learned to use one. In fact, I've never once cut the thread and pulled it from the bottom. The tension only gets "messed up" if you pull backwards on the discs when they are engaged...in other words, when the foot is down. If the foot is not down at the time, it doesn't matter if you unthread your machine frontwards, backwards or sideways.
    The Earth without art is just "Eh".

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    Senior Member Scraplady's Avatar
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    I was told by a quilting instructor that it also has something to do with the "grain" of the thread, the way it's twisted it should only go forward through the machine. Don't know if that is true or not. I do know that I've been doing it the "wrong" way for so many years it's just an ingrained habit. It has never caused me any problems yet...
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    Power Poster QuiltE's Avatar
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    It's the newer computer machines that need the thread pulled forward and never backwards.

    The older ones are more forgiving.
    However, I am now getting in the habit of "wasting" that little bit of thread no matter what machine ... just for the extra precaution.
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    Super Member alleyoop1's Avatar
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    Bernina recommends pulling the thread out through the needle and not the other way because you can mess up the thingys that control the thread feeding through the machine. Once you do it a few times, it becomes a habit. As to the small amount of wasted thread - it's a whole lot cheaper than having your machine repaired! And I know someone who saves those threads to use later on one of her beautiful art quilts.

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    Power Poster PaperPrincess's Avatar
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    I've sewn for 50+ years and have always cut the thread at the spool and pulled forward. Want to know why? 'Cause my mom told me to!
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  10. #10
    Super Member quiltinghere's Avatar
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    Janome website http://alturl.com/meh83 has this posted:


    What is the best way to unthread my sewing machine? -Anonymous
    Dear Anonymous,
    Always cut the thread at the spool and pull the thread through the needle and out of the machine. If you remove the thread by pulling on the spool, the thread can easily get caught, affecting the tension as you pull. Lint from the thread can also cause the needle to bend at the tip, resulting in snagged fabric or inconsistent stitching.

    Truth be told, I just started snipping the thread at the spool and right before the threaded needle. Then with the foot raised, I pull down/forward slowly.

    This is similar to the way I change thread on my longarm machine.

    Nan - Indiana


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    I saw this tip on one of Nancy Zieman's shows . She mentioned that it will "floss" the machine if there is any lint along the thread path. I have to admit I don't always remember to do it.

  12. #12
    Super Member joysewer's Avatar
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    I learned this in Home Ec as well. I think I have mostly used it because when I made all my clothing, I used thread to match everything. I would cut the thread at the spool, tie it to the next color thread I wanted to use and pull it through right before the needle. Then the new color would be on and no total threading of the machine. We did the same thing when I worked at a custom embroidery shop. You wouldn't want to have to thread all those needles if you didn't have to.
    Gloria 

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    Super Member jcrow's Avatar
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    My Bernina instructions clearly states to cut the thread at the spool and pull the thread from the needle. Otherwise it can cause damage. I thought it was only for my machine. I have other machines so it's good to know I need to do this for all my sewing machines.
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    I have done it that way since forever. My grandmothers said it was like fraying the thread and making it unusable. And when you pull it out the correct way knot it at the end. that way you know which end to stick in the eye of the needle. I do that and stick it in my pincushion for an emergency button repair or tack job.

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    learned something new today.

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    Senior Member SusanSusan33's Avatar
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    I was taught this when I bought my first nice machine at a sewing machine shop about 14 years ago.. It makes sense, but I'd never have thought of it if I wasn't told...

  17. #17
    Power Poster mighty's Avatar
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    Thank you, I never knew that either. I have often thought when I pulled it out that it does not seem like it could be good for the machine.

  18. #18
    Super Member Raggiemom's Avatar
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    Thanks for the tip! Now I just need to remember to do it.
    Heather

  19. #19
    Super Member mom-6's Avatar
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    Wow learn something new everyday! I never heard that in either HS or college home ec. Of course since my kids they'll me that was in the prehistoric era, maybe that's why. Lol!

  20. #20
    Super Member MartiMorga's Avatar
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    This was a major issue with the tension, I was told. My new machines by Baby Lock don't have this issue. But how can that be, my mind asks? So sometimes I do it right and sometimes I do it wrong. Sometimes my Scottish blood just doesn't like me wasting so much thread. Of course, I do clean my machine often.
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    New to me also. I will need to make a note & put it where I well see it, to remind myself, until I get used to doing it this way. Old habits are hard to break. But, I don't want to mess up my machine. They are not cheap to fix or replace.
    Thanks for sharing this info.
    Vonda-Texas MiMi of 4 Beautiful Grandbabies

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    Super Member Lisa_wanna_b_quilter's Avatar
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    If it is a tension issue, it seems like you could cut the thread right before the tension knob and pull forward. On my machine that would waste much less thread than cutting at the spool.

  23. #23
    Senior Member Prissnboot's Avatar
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    So forgive me for not having yet read all the responses, but what happens if your thread breaks and you can't find the end that goes through the needle? How do you get the thread out then?
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    Quote Originally Posted by KwiltyKahy View Post
    I saw this tip on one of Nancy Zieman's shows . She mentioned that it will "floss" the machine if there is any lint along the thread path. I have to admit I don't always remember to do it.
    I remember Nancy's tip, too, and sometimes remember to do it! It does seem to make sense to "floss" for lint.

  25. #25
    Power Poster Jingle's Avatar
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    I read this sometime back when someone posted it. I tried to remember for a while but, returned to the 'wrong' way. My machines are not computerized. Never had a problem doing it 'wrong'.
    Another Phyllis
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