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Thread: What can a 6 yr old sew???

  1. #1
    Senior Member LastGrandma's Avatar
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    What can a 6 yr old sew???

    I bought my DGD a kids sewing machine while visiting Ohio last month. Mom was with me and urged me to buy it for her Holiday present. It was on sale and I did get a promise from Mom to supervise EVERY time DGD wants to use it. However, her last remark to me was to "Send her something to sew because I am not going to buy all that stuff!"

    Well, now I am home and knowing my daughter has as much sewing knowledge as her daughter, I do not know what to send DGD for her first sewing machine project. I think a simple 4 patch doll quilt would be great, but any other suggestions?

    Thank you in advance for your suggestions. LastGrandma
    There is no such thing as ugly fabric...just cut it smaller!

  2. #2
    Moderator Up North's Avatar
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    Name:  Maddy and dad learning to tie quilt.jpg
Views: 394
Size:  69.0 KBMy Granddaughter at 6 sewed charm squares together and made a small lap quilt for herself. She even learned to tie it.

  3. #3
    Super Member Candace's Avatar
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    I taught my 6 year old niece and our first project was a rag quilt.

  4. #4
    Senior Member neeng's Avatar
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    Doll blankets are a great start.

    You can also show her how to do a small purse (send a series of photos with simple instructions on how to make the "pocket"). Pillows are good too. PJ pants are easy but you'd need to send her a pattern for her size.

    I got my 5yo DGD a machine for Christmas this year since she likes to sew when we have 'sleepovers'. Can't wait until she sees it!
    This fabric would be just perfect for a....

  5. #5
    Super Member valleyquiltermo's Avatar
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    6 yr old sewing

    My DGD was just 6 when I got her a singer childs machine and she made a charm quilted wall hanging.
    We did the sew it with backing and batting around the edges and then turned it right side out. It was quilted with her sewing cute buttons on it by hand.
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    Last edited by valleyquiltermo; 11-16-2011 at 08:32 AM. Reason: typo
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  6. #6
    Senior Member LastGrandma's Avatar
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    Wonderful suggestions....I am 2500 miles away and cannot do anything with her and her sewing machine. And DD is not handy with sewing stuff. When DGD visits here we usually spend a fair amount of time in my sewing room doing things (doll quilts, wall hangings, etc.), but I cannot give assistance with her sewing other than the type of project I send.
    There is no such thing as ugly fabric...just cut it smaller!

  7. #7
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    I made doll clothes with help from my mom.
    Linda

  8. #8
    Senior Member CarrieC's Avatar
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    My first suggestion, considering the distance and lack of a mentor on her end, I'd pre-cut whatever I sent and make sure to send easy "1 - 2 - 3" instructions. Given that here are some easy suggestions:

    Pillowcases
    Totes
    Small doll quilt (to tie)
    Maybe some 9 patches to begin assembling into quilt blocks to put together at a later date - maybe to bring with her to your house next summer?
    Carrie, Queen of the Seam Rippers!

  9. #9
    Moderator QuiltnNan's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Up North View Post
    Name:  Maddy and dad learning to tie quilt.jpg
Views: 394
Size:  69.0 KBMy Granddaughter at 6 sewed charm squares together and made a small lap quilt for herself. She even learned to tie it.
    What a great picture that is.... have to keep that one to show her kids
    Nancy in western NY
    before you speak THINK
    T – is it True? H – is it Helpful? I – is it Inspiring? N – is it Necessary? K – is it Kind?


  10. #10
    Moderator QuiltnNan's Avatar
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    it must break your heart to have her so far away You can make a tut like we do on here. i think doll blankets is the best choice for a first project... no curves or angles.
    Nancy in western NY
    before you speak THINK
    T – is it True? H – is it Helpful? I – is it Inspiring? N – is it Necessary? K – is it Kind?


  11. #11
    Super Member Gladys's Avatar
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    Wow these kids did great! I'm trying to remember what my first project was because I started sewing about that time with my Grandmother. I think it was strips because she said I had to learn the "feel" of the machine.

    If you make a couple of squares you might try putting 2 sides together, hand baste it with long stitches then say this is where you sew with your machine. Tell her or write " Just stitch with your machine over my stitches". You could do that with several of the blocks till she gets the hang of it.

    Probaby speed (was with my daughter) from pushing the floor pedal too hard could be an issue.You might try sending her long strips first, then squares. Just so she can get the feel of the sewing machine and see her progress.

    If it were me I'd send her little things to practice on every week before sending a complete kit. Kinda like a correspondence class. I bet she loves to get mail. Who knows maybe your daughter will even get interested??? Good luck!

  12. #12
    Power Poster amma's Avatar
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    Maybe let her practice sewing without thread, on coloring book pages? Just to get more used to the feel and handling of the machine.

    Patterns that don't have matching seams are also nice, less for them to do and have a nice looking project. Especially since you are not there to help her with the pinning.

    You can sew blocks together into a strip, then add a 1/2 block to the beginning of one end, then the end of the next strip, keep alternating in this fashion. This way the squares are off set, and she won't have to match the intersections. You can do the same kind of offset with many other blocks too.
    “The simplest toy, one which even the youngest child can operate, is called a grandparent.” Sam Levenson

  13. #13
    Super Member quilttiludrop's Avatar
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    Anything simple. Potholders, aprons, decorations . . . . .
    Carol's Quilt Farm
    Beautiful quilting for your beautiful quilts!

  14. #14
    Senior Member shnnn's Avatar
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    my dd started sewing scraps into pillows when she was 4 1/2, then stuffed them with more scraps. What I've found with her is it's easiest for her to sew short seams - she started sewing a quilt with big framed cattywompus squares earlier this year (at 6) my though process being the big squares would be easier for her to handle, but it's put away and she made a 4 patch posy with smaller squares and much less frustration until it came time to sew the rows together (long seams again). As for the machine... be expecting some calls for help -- dd got a childs machine for christmas a couple years ago-- I could not get it to work right

  15. #15
    Moderator Up North's Avatar
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    I also made my Granddaughter a little sewing kit, Found kids Fiskers scissors at dollar tree a small ruler, some pins extra needles and bobbins already wound, a small pin cushion and a 5 inch square of Plexiglas for making squares but I had already precut them for her.

  16. #16
    Super Member 3incollege's Avatar
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    When my DD got a sewing machine, I bought a toy one, it was a Singer. It was so hard to use. I had to help her with every step. She liked to sew with felt, she made clothes for her beenie babies. Pillows were a big hit.
    I would make up a kit for her, so she doesn't lose interest.
    Donna

  17. #17
    Senior Member SUZAG's Avatar
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    The panels that you cut out and make a doll or stuffed animal with the stitch lines have always been nice and good practice for staying in the lines. Of course, there is always the aprons that we started on in Home Ec that had the band that you slid into a pocket instead of the ties...

  18. #18
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    My two granddaughters have sewn with me since they were 3. I am teaching a class to the youngests kindergardten class and they are all going to make scarfs out of minkie or fleece. Cut 2 pieces 9" wide and the width of the fabric about 60'' Sew both side seams in to a tube and then turn. Trim the bottom of both ends in to strips about 1/2" wide and tie them to finish off. I hadd my granddaughter try it our before I go to the school and she did it just fine.

    Good Luck. Remember, you are getting a new generation in to the sewing/quilting hobby.

  19. #19
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    I would send her a quilting book for beginners with a simple pattern marked that she should be able to do as her first project and the fabric needed to make it.
    Fabric is like money, no matter how much you have it's never enough.

  20. #20
    Senior Member jollyquilting's Avatar
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    I found a book on quilting for children to practice and learn about machines; and sewing too. They practice sewing without a needle to start but can practice. Plain old squares, either 4 patch or like they have suggested about 5 or 6 in squares.
    Jo

  21. #21
    Super Member jitkaau's Avatar
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    Depends on maturity and ability of each individual. However, I have had seven year olds making totes and scarves to match. Doll's clothes and quilts are a good item. The boys quilted and made a duffle bag. I think a small qquilt would be OK as well. I was making them at seven years of age without my grandmother hovering over me. My mother didn't sew.

  22. #22
    Super Member nhweaver's Avatar
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    In her area, are there any 4H clubs? Sometimes there is a quilting group of kids.
    Quote Originally Posted by LastGrandma View Post
    Wonderful suggestions....I am 2500 miles away and cannot do anything with her and her sewing machine. And DD is not handy with sewing stuff. When DGD visits here we usually spend a fair amount of time in my sewing room doing things (doll quilts, wall hangings, etc.), but I cannot give assistance with her sewing other than the type of project I send.
    If life gives you lemons, make a margarita.

  23. #23
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    I too am in the same situation with a great niece. All of this advice was very much appreciated by me also. They are very good ideas. I especially like using charm packs.
    When a child shows an interest in learning a craft you don't want to miss the opportunity to teach. Thanks for the inspiration.
    Why sleep when you can quilt.
    Luckydenny

  24. #24
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    Yahoo has a feature of instant messaging that will allow you to have a video conference call with her. Mom would still have to be present, but you can do a lot of coaching via the video conference.

  25. #25
    Super Member soccertxi's Avatar
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    I have 2 brothers and a sister doing string blocks. I let them paw thru my strings and strips. The flip and sew method means that the seams are not as important as getting the feel for fabric and running the machine. They only get fabric when they can sew on lines on a piece of notebook paper. Those boys love to make that machine GO! lolol
    Beth in AZ
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