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Thread: what do you do with your creations?

  1. #1
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    what do you do with your creations?

    I'm new here. My name is Marcia and I was recently left a really nice Janome machine, fabric, and notions by a dear aunt's passing. While I miss her a lot, I know that she would be tickled to see that her bequest is getting me into quilting!

    As I'm making room for all the supplies and contemplating projects, a question has occurred to me... What can I do with the quilts I produce if I really get into this hobby? I mean... I'm 56 years old. My home is decorated and I have many quilts already from Aunti (that she made when alive and left after passing).

    I have grown children and grandchildren, but having watched Aunti, I know that quilts aren't always the thing to give to them...

    So, I'm wondering... Can you sell them online for anything like materials' costs... never mind your time... or get involved with charity groups? (I live on an isolated farm, so no local guilds for me...) I don't want what I make to just sit in storage... So, what have you done?

    Do tell!

  2. #2
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    I have not had very much luck in selling my quilts online. The hobby of quilting will be expensive but very worthwhile. There are many charity groups that love quilts. Can't think of any at the moment. You might have to mail them if you are in an isolated farm. Good luck and have fun.

  3. #3
    Super Member ontheriver's Avatar
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    I gift to family and friends, give to charities like Linus and quilts of valor, there are others also, this is just two that come to mind. I also sell quite a few that are commissioned, online, and different venues in my area.
    Jeanann

    Theres nothing wrong with me a little chocolate won't fix.

  4. #4
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    I am slowly working my way through relatives (my children, parents, siblings, nieces and nephews, etc). I do also do charity baby quilts for a local pregnancy center.

    I suspect when each of my three kiddos marry that I will make them a larger quilt (they each have more of a lap/twin/snuggle quilt now).

    I hope to produce one or two that actually are put into charity auctions this year. But it takes the charity giving me plenty of advanced notice.

    In the future, I would love to make some and sell them, but I am not sure people will pay what the supplies are worth (much less any extra for time). I would need to make close to $500 per quilt. Right now, I don't have the time or energy to do so with a different full time job.

  5. #5
    Super Member Gramie bj's Avatar
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    Lap quilts for nursing homes, and shelters, Some area hospice have a use for them, look for a guild near you, I'm sure they could point you in the right direction. Our local guild also supply some to the city police. they carry them in the patrol cars and wrap children in them when they have to remove them from bad situations. My friend belongs to a group of ladies who make quilts for disaster victims.

  6. #6
    Super Member Jeanne S's Avatar
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    I think it is rare to be able to sell a quilt for a price that would recover your costs. I think most of us make quilts for gifts and for charity. There are lots of charities that like them. If you have a local quilt guild group, they can give you suggestions for local charities. I donate to our local senior centers (lap quilt size) and the Justice Center which is a non profit agency that cares for minor children who have been removed from their homes. Check with any veterans organizations you have locally for possibilities. We also have DVIS (shelters for women and children of domestic violence) who love quilts and household items. Many churches have an emergency closet for folks in need or who have lost everything in fires or other disasters and they like quilts. There are just so many non profit organizations that need items like quilts. If you have a local United Way office they can give you information too. Many make baby quilts for local hospitals too.

  7. #7
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    Wow! These are a lot of great ideas! Thanks!

  8. #8
    Super Member newbee3's Avatar
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    I wondered the same thing since I have made quilts for my family and a few friends. I know they probably don't want too many quilts but I do think they will cherish them and use them. I am sure your children and grandchildren would love to have a quilt that you made. Now I quilt for Linuis group they give quilts to children. I also make quilts to donate to that same charity. There are many charities that would love to get quilts. Wounded warriors is one also Quilt of Valor is another. I have given quilts to VA hospital they appreciated them.

  9. #9
    Power Poster earthwalker's Avatar
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    Make them and inspiration will come! Just do it and you will be amazed at how they can find homes. Charities are always a good place to start, also making raffle quilts for causes dear to you....the list is endless.

  10. #10
    Power Poster ckcowl's Avatar
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    So many places accept and appreciate gift quilts... The senior center, area long term care facilities, emergency shelters, hospice House, hospitals, locally. Then there are all the large, national organizations - St.Jude's, project Linus, Downy Quilts for Kids, Quilts of Valor, Shriners, The American Legion, the Lions, the VFW, Cancer centers, the list just goes on & on.
    hiding away in my stash where i'm warm, safe and happy

  11. #11
    Power Poster PaperPrincess's Avatar
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    It's also nice just to have a few throw sized quilts on hand. They make nice gifts for friends & family who suddenly become ill or just in need of a hug, and it's always nice to have a couple baby quilts so you are not in a last minute situation the day before the shower. I personally don't stress if the quilt doesn't match the baby's room!
    "I do not understand how anyone can live without one small place of enchantment to turn to."
    Marjorie Kinnan Rawlings

  12. #12
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    I donate through my guild - even if you're too far away from a guild to join up, you can probably email the local one and get a list of charities. Some charities have specific needs/wants for the quilt construction, others will take whatever they can get.

    Charities for women & children go through a lot of quilts, and some animal shelters will take them too.

    Our guild had a speaker come in recently from the local women's shelter that we donate to, and by the time she was done telling us how much these quilts matter to these women there wasn't a dry eye in the room!! So it's really sweet of you to think to sew and donate quilts with your inheritance, I'm sure your aunt is beaming with pride and joy wherever she is.

  13. #13
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    Welcome, so glad you joined us. As far as what to do with your inheritance, there are many organizations that would love to receive lap quilts, 99% of my quilts are donated to kids with cancer or some other nasty disease, I also make 2 quilts a year to our local Humane Society as fund raisers. I also live in an isolated area, so when I go where the kids hospital is, I take a pile of them with me and deliver them. The kids and parents are always thrilled to get their own quilt. As for selling, most people don't have a clue about the expense and work that goes into a quilt, since they can get the whole bed "set" at WalMart, KMart, Target for under $100, they figure that only the quilt should be much less, since they're not getting the "set", people don't want to pay much at all, people who KNOW what goes into making a quilt are much more liable to pay the price.

    I would love to make quilts for our local nursing home, but after checking with them, they told me that when the resident passes, that if their family doesn't want the quilt, they toss it in the garbage. I asked them why, since they wouldn't be made with a specific person in mind, they said that's their policy, so needless to say, I won't be donating any quilts to them.
    Last edited by pocoellie; 12-29-2014 at 06:31 AM.

  14. #14
    Super Member mom-6's Avatar
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    I also live in "podunkville" but I've discovered that there's always somebody around who can use a quilt. It may be a family member, it may be a friend, it may be someone I don't know very well, or even someone who's a friend of a friend. But it's really nice to have some on hand that are done or nearly done when the occasion arises.
    So go ahead and make those quilts to your hearts content, a recipient will show up when you least expect it!

  15. #15
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    And you can make pillowcases for charities as well. Quicker but still appreciated.

  16. #16
    Super Member meyert's Avatar
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    I agree with you, your aunt would be pleased to see you using what she left you. What to do with the creations is a good question... I haven't really been seriously into this too long. Bought my own machine just 1-1/2 years ago. But I have been keeping busy since then.

    I found Quilts or Kids and I love that organization and I get a lot of practice making those quilts. Quilts for Kids sends me the kits for free (I have to pay postage to my house and to return the completed quilts). All I have to provide is my time, thread and batting - the fabric and pattern is shipped free of charge.

    I have made some quilts for my family... and I will probably keep making them.

  17. #17
    Power Poster ManiacQuilter2's Avatar
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    I enjoy making charity quilts for others. It depends on what you would like to do. There are local Linus groups that make quilts for children. There are disaster charity groups that will take anything such as fabric, blocks or quilt tops and make them ready for the next disaster to hit our country. I am a member of the local church's group of sewers which I do enjoy going to their meetings twice a month. Good Luck in your search.
    A Good Friend, like an old quilt, is both a Treasure and a Comfort

  18. #18
    Super Member citruscountyquilter's Avatar
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    There are many things you could make using quilting skills other than quilts. I take ready made dishtowels and put patchwork strips on them, same could be done with bath towels. I did Seminole patchwork and put a border on a top sheet and pillowcases as a gift for Christmas. Mug rugs and potholders are always needed. Pick your favorite quilt block and make that the basis for a pot holder. I helped someone make a quilted tea cozy for a tea pot. Placemats are another idea. I use quilts for table cloths (not when serving spaghetti or small children!). Pillow covers are another way to use quilting skills. There are other ideas I'm sure.

  19. #19
    Junior Member ShelleyCS's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by PaperPrincess View Post
    It's also nice just to have a few throw sized quilts on hand. They make nice gifts for friends & family who suddenly become ill or just in need of a hug, and it's always nice to have a couple baby quilts so you are not in a last minute situation the day before the shower. I personally don't stress if the quilt doesn't match the baby's room!
    I agree with paper princess. I wish I had a few quilts in reserve. I'm still new to quilting and when a friend became ill or another had a baby, I had none to give and not enough time to make one. Keep a couple extras for just those emergencies when you know a quilt will soothe.

  20. #20
    Super Member IrishgalfromNJ's Avatar
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    Gave away a few, but now I'm quilting just for me. I don't know when I'll have enough, I'm always thinking of anothe project.

  21. #21
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    First I would see from your children and DGKs what their response is to receiving quilts. You can try donating or even making small place settings or to your local family shelters and animal shelters. I don't take on commissioned quilts. I would not sell mine but yours might be better. I just like doing it. though haven't done much lately.

  22. #22
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    How rude of me! BTW Welcome to the board!!

  23. #23
    Super Member franc36's Avatar
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    At age 75, I started quilting. Since then, I have made almost 200 quilts. Yes, for me, it is a very expensive hobby because I work on quilting every spare minute. I have never had a problem with giving away quilts. I make them for my daughters, my granddaughter, my grand sons, the foster children, relatives, my sister, my friends, my grand children's friends, etc. People seem to love getting one of my quilts and I so enjoy making and giving them away.

  24. #24
    Senior Member Terri D.'s Avatar
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    First, if you sell your quilts, you absolutely must account for your time; it is just as valuable as any of the supplies you need to make a quilt.

    I wouldn't worry about what to do with the quilts you make if you're hesitant to give them away or donate them. Oftentimes, the joy is in creating it.

    My quilts are scattered around the house, hung on walls, thrown over sofa backs, folded and ready on the recliner for nap time. We love living among them even if they don't exactly match the rest of the decor.

  25. #25
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    i belong to a few homemakers groups and/or quilting groups. i have only been quilting a few years. and i have all the quilts i need, for now. i've given to family members who i thought would "APPRECIATE" one. my greatest enjoyment is giving to a local hospital, senior center, home for unwed mothers, displaced families, rehab center. i cant worry about 'is the nurse going to take the quilts instead of giving them to patints', or whats going to happen to the quilt once i give it away. when i give away the quilt, i'm done. no looking back. no wondering who has it. did they keep it. someone has it. they are enjoying it. and i enjoyed making it and giving it away. i agree with someone above that said contact a guild, they will tell you where to send the quilt you made, or better yet maybe someone in the guild can come by and pickup a quilt. good luck! and enjoy.

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