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Thread: What do you think of my idea for basting quilts?

  1. #1
    Senior Member cmw0829's Avatar
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    What do you think of my idea for basting quilts?

    I've seen Sharon Schamber's videos on thread basting: rolling the top and backing on different 1x4 boards, then unrolling the backing, lay on the batting and unroll the top, then baste with thread. The appeal of this is no safety pins, can easily mark tops after basting rather than before, can baste and put aside until the urge to quilt appears. However, I don't really want to deal with the rolling/unrolling, and hand-basting would take f-o-r-e-v-e-r!

    Then I read about someone who uses a long-armer just to baste her quilts and then she quilts herself on her domestic when she gets around to it.

    So here's my idea. Why can't I baste my quilt with pins the usual way (maybe not as closely as I normally would) and then run the quilt under my machine using the basting stitch every six to eight or more inches? (I'm assuming that my even feed would run this long stitch.) Or spray glue baste and then do the same thing just in case the glue loses its stickiness?

    I'm just trying to find an easy and cost-effective to have my quilts at the ready.

    Thoughts?? Thanks.

  2. #2
    Power Poster Prism99's Avatar
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    Are you thinking that spray basting with 505 would be too expensive? I haven't figured out the exact cost per quilt of using 505, but I know it's not enough to keep me from using it. I can't imagine doing all that extra work to baste a large quilt when I can easily do it with 505. It does not lose its stickiness over time; only when the quilt is washed. I buy it online and estimate it costs $10 or less per queen-size quilt to use it.

  3. #3
    Junior Member Joy.lynn's Avatar
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    Try it and lets us know how it works. I can't use sprays. I can use cornstarch for stiffening. I always use it quite heavily on the backing so it I just might try this.

  4. #4
    Power Poster BellaBoo's Avatar
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    Sometimes I will use small pieces of light weight fusible to baste my quilt. I put a small piece every few inches and press the batting to the back and then the top to the batting. It only takes tiny pieces to hold the quilt layers together.

    I usually let the LA baste my quilts. She does it for $20 for a queen size quilt. Her basting stitches are about 5 inches apart in a cross hatching pattern.
    Last edited by BellaBoo; 08-07-2012 at 09:47 AM.
    Got fabric?

  5. #5
    Super Member Yarn or Fabric's Avatar
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    I had never even thought of having a longarmer baste a quilt. That is a good idea
    I haven't tried Sharon Schamber's method yet but I love the idea of it. I will be giving it a try. For now I had been doing safety pins - which sadly does get me some puckers on the back but since switched to spray basting...

    My quilt group meets at a college classroom every 3 Saturdays and they have lots of long tables. A few in our group say they're going to begin basting their quilts there since there is more room there than they have at home.

  6. #6
    Power Poster dunster's Avatar
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    Before I got a longarm I used the John Flynn frame (the only time I ever used it!) to baste a large quilt with water soluble thread. Then I was able to quilt it on my DSM. There was no worry about stitching over the basting threads, and no need to remove them as I quilted. I still use water soluble thread on the longarm when I want to baste a quilt to stabilize it.

  7. #7
    Senior Member cmw0829's Avatar
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    Hmmm...after reading your thoughts, I'm wondering if basting on my domestic is going to be too much thread.

    I like the idea of the spray basting but don't have a space in the house where I could do that. The only option would be my basement as we don't have a garage and I'd be too afraid of the flammability and the pilots on our furnace and water heater.

    I like the idea of the John Flynn frame which wouldn't be too much different than the Sharon Schamber idea. Now, if I do decide to do that, my husband is going to kill me since I bought and returned two 8-ft lengths of 1x4 when I thought I would go that route. Why did I return them? Because they sat on my dining room table for a few months and didn't get used.

    Thanks for your input.

  8. #8
    Power Poster Prism99's Avatar
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    Have you considered spray basting outside? It's pretty inexpensive to purchase a couple of sawhorses and a sheet of plywood to lay on top of them. You need a storage space for them when not in use (garage!), but they store fairly flat and don't take up a lot of room.

    If you have a garage, some people use an inside garage wall (taping to the surface) for spray basting. Another option is to purchase a couple of 4x8 foam boards from a home supply place, create duct tape as a hinge for them, and prop them against the outside of a house as a smooth surface to spray baste.

    One nice thing about spray basting outside is you don't have to worry about overspray!

  9. #9
    Senior Member grammatjr's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by dunster View Post
    Before I got a longarm I used the John Flynn frame (the only time I ever used it!) to baste a large quilt with water soluble thread. Then I was able to quilt it on my DSM. There was no worry about stitching over the basting threads, and no need to remove them as I quilted. I still use water soluble thread on the longarm when I want to baste a quilt to stabilize it.
    Great idea, Dunster! I have a Flynn, and on the whole like it, but find it frustrating becuase of the small throat of my DSM. This is a perfect answer. I found that with the walking foot, it will self feed the quilt, with very little intervention from me. So, if I add the water soluble thread - I can go on to other projects while my quilt bastes itself!

  10. #10
    Power Poster Jingle's Avatar
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    I just pin mine with big safety pins on my glass topped dining table. It works for me.
    Another Phyllis
    This life is the only one you get - enjoy it before you lose it.

  11. #11
    Senior Member Tashana's Avatar
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    I am about to try Elmers school glue. It worked on smaller projects, I don't see why it would not work on a large one. Will post results!
    I've got a smile on my face, I've got four walls around me
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    I'll win now but sometimes I'll lose
    I've been battered, but I'll never bruise

  12. #12
    Senior Member Patti25314's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Tashana View Post
    I am about to try Elmers school glue. It worked on smaller projects, I don't see why it would not work on a large one. Will post results!
    I would think you'd break some needles -- lol. I can't wait to hear how this works out, but I'm not giving up 505 spray basting now that I've found it. I've been told that you can use it inside if area is well ventilated. BTW, to those of you new to 505, don't over use it. A little goes a long way. It can gum up your machine.

  13. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by Patti25314 View Post
    A little goes a long way. It can gum up your machine.
    I've been using 505 exclusively for some time now. I am, unfortunately, not light handed with it. Particularly on the edges. I let it dry for at least a day before I begin quilting and I have never had it gum up my machine.
    However, this being said I have had partial cans sitting and sometimes the glue can get a little bit thicker as it gets older. To compensate for this I just give it a little extra time to dry. I think making sure that the adhesive is dry is key.

  14. #14
    Super Member jitkaau's Avatar
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    My Brother sewing machine has a big basting stitch on it. I am going to try that one on my next quilt to see how it goes. Usually, I spray baste with the cheapest spray possible and they all turn out ok and don't come apart even if left for months.

  15. #15
    Senior Member rj.neihart's Avatar
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    Personally, I do not baste anymore. I used to lay the three layers on the floor, baste my heart out, and kill my back bending over for such long durations. I now lay all three layers as I want them, and use safety pins while making sure there are no puckers. If I have time, I'll put that quilt into the floor stand...if not, then I just roll it up tightly, and set it aside for quilting later. The glue thingy is a little out of my budget, so I have learned to improvise.

  16. #16
    Senior Member dorrell ann's Avatar
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    I still have problems basting my quilts and might try the spray-I really enjoy reading all of the comments -what piles of info!!!!

  17. #17
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    I pin my quilts, then quilt any straight lines about 10-12" apart, then I can take the pins our and quilt later iwhen I want to.

  18. #18
    Super Member pollyjvan9's Avatar
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    I use the spray baste from Hancocks and I don't think it would take a whole can to baste a queen size, but I don't make quilts that large so I'm not sure. The regular price is about $12.00 I think and I always use the coupon or get it on sale. I do several twin size from one can. Also, I always spray baste using the foam board insulation pieces and open windows when I work on the inside. One day I moved everything outside and sandwiched 8 or 10 quilts...easy peasy.

  19. #19
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    Nancy Zieman showed basting a quilt with the fusibles and I wondered if it worked well. Bellaboo, do you have good luck doing that?

  20. #20
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    There are soo many good ideas from everyone here. I like the idea of having the longarmer baste the quilt for me and have even ask her what she would charge. She said $30 - $40. I probably would have her do it for that price.
    Lorraine

  21. #21
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    I, too, use the spray - usually 505 bought at JoAnns with coupon. However, I've seen the demo on 'Pinmores' and may order a bag to try. Leah Day uses them now and seems to like them. Here is the link: http://www.pinmoor.com/index.html

  22. #22
    Super Member Happy Linda's Avatar
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    I use 505 spray basting. The tute I watched on youtube said one of hers was still good 5 yrs. later. I'm not a professional but have had on puckers using this technic. Just make sure the bottom is tight. I do this on my wood floor with news paper around the edges. The youtube tute hung it on a wall. I don't have a free wall.
    Linda

  23. #23
    Member janbland's Avatar
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    I thought Sharon Schamber's method would be time consuming, but it really isn't. Once you get going on the basting, it really moves right along. And, the payoff you get for having the layers basted without ripples in the back is well worth the effort.

  24. #24
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    I went to a class where the instructor told us of a method to baste your quilt. She used wash away thread to baste the quilt using her machine. Then when she had finished the quilt, she simply washed it and the basting threads would disappear.

  25. #25
    Senior Member cmw0829's Avatar
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    Thanks for all the replies everybody. Lots of good suggestions here. I think I'll try Helenquilt's suggestion first. If it doesn't suit me, I'll try another of the suggestions.

    Helen, how long is your basting stitch?

    Thanks,
    Cathy

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