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What's the best type of sewing machine to get for quilting?

What's the best type of sewing machine to get for quilting?

Old 08-06-2011, 07:25 PM
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Hi!

I'm new to quilting, and am thinking about buying the Brother SE400 Computerized Embroidery Sewing Machine. Does anyone know if this sewing machine supports the kind of stitch work involved with quilting?

I have no other sewing machinery, I'm a true (but enthusiastic!) novice.

Any advice would be really great, thank you!
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Old 08-06-2011, 07:36 PM
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There are many machines out there. It would be best if you could try out as many as you can before making a choice. What is right for one person may not be right for you. If you have dealers in your area visit them for test drives.
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Old 08-06-2011, 07:37 PM
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the trouble with a combo machine is, when you want to quilt/sew you have to change everything to sewing, and so it goes...

also you can not be embroidering while sewing..so when will you get to embroider??

also most of the emb. machines do not have the large throat area for machine quilting...do some searches on here...at the top you can see search as an field..type in embroidery machines, and quilting machines and read some of the great discussions on both!

Welcome!
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Old 08-06-2011, 07:37 PM
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Originally Posted by ontheriver
There are many machines out there. It would be best if you could try out as many as you can before making a choice. What is right for one person may not be right for you. If you have dealers in your area visit them for test drives.
ditto!
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Old 08-06-2011, 07:41 PM
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Welcome! I learned to quilt on my 1990's Singer and it's still my workhorse today.

I agree with the others that you'll want to try several before you buy. Over time you'll discover what's most important to YOU in a machine. :)
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Old 08-06-2011, 07:44 PM
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I bought my first "real" machine in April (before that I had an inexpensive machine that gave me fits). I say real because I spent nearly $400 for it after researching a ton. I went with the Janome DC2010. I actually decided on the brand first and emailed a "local" (45 min away) shop regarding a certain model. The shop owner sent me an email back and explained that she felt that there was a better option (the DC2010) for me in the same price range. The fact that she emailed me back quickly made me know that I was making the right decision. However, I knew it was a great deal when she mentioned that she offers free classes on how to use the machine for life. She was starting up the classes again soon after I bought my machine and we are almost finished with the course.

I had NO sewing experience before taking these classes...everything I had done was just by using my old machine (which wasn't much). I cannot tell you how much I have learned since taking the classes. I never would have thought that I could do so much.

So, I don't know anything about the machine that you list (though it looks like it has good reviews) but I would definitely shop around and see if you can get one that comes with free (or inexpensive) lessons from a local quilt shop.

Good luck! Hope this helps.
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Old 08-06-2011, 07:46 PM
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I have an embroidery machine and thought I would forever do embroidery...which I did learn and do for a while, but ultimately that lead me to needing to do something with the embroidery I made since I wasn't into clothing. I made quilts with it. Now I just use that machine for quilting. It works fine for both. Who know when I will decide I want to do more embroidery?

I don't know anything about that machine though.
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Old 08-06-2011, 07:49 PM
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Go to some sewing machine shops and try different brands...don't let anyone talk you into one before you try several.
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Old 08-06-2011, 08:03 PM
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Hi,
I am a newbie here on the board, but been quilting a while. I learned hand quilting a loooong time ago...about 3 years ago I joined a quilting group locally, and they all thought I was "toony" by not machine quilting, too...so, off I went to try that! I can tell you what I have learned with the process, that I wish I had asked more questions, or learned sooner...I started with a Singer I had around just for household sewing...decided I wanted a computerized machine, went to the Brother CS6000i...after a bit, decided I really wanted to have auto thread cutting and a knee-lift...so got the Brother PC-420...both of the Brothers are great for general sewing, and piecing quilts, decorative applique, stitching, etc. Of course the PC-420 may be considered a "step up", so I have been using it most of the time...But, when I went to free motion quilt (fmq), it was not going so well for me...I really found I needed a machine with a larger harp (throat area) and one that was just more substantial...so, now I have just received the Brother PQ1500S, it is a straight stitch only machine, but has auto thread cut, knee-lift, up to 1500 stitches a minute, and from what my research shows, is really good for quilting, both fmq and straight line or stitch in the ditch...so far it has been awesome for fmq, and also for just straight quilt in the ditch for me...so, long story short, I think it really depends on what you want to do...I feel like I do need the PC-420 for decorative stitch, zig zag, etc...but for actual quilting, I think the industrial PQ1500S is best...and, for me, the cost of both machines is less than what I had researched and would have paid for just 1 machine that could do all things, AND have a larger harp area. As the others have stated, it really IS a personal preference, too...I hope some of my long rambling may help you, tho...good luck! And I know you will get more help here, this board is great!! :-D
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Old 08-06-2011, 08:25 PM
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Quilting is a 2-step process. For piecing you can probably use any machine, but for doing the actual quilting, it is MUCH more pleasant if there is a lot of room under the arm (this area is called the harp). I have an embroidery machine that also sews. It sews OK, but I would rather be embroidering on it and sewing on the other since I have to change threads when I am embroidering and some of the patterns take forever. I will piece on it if I have to (like when my machine is in the shop), but for most piecing and the actual quilting I use either the Janome 7700 or my Juki which is on a quilting frame.
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