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Thread: Why does it cost so much to repair a sewing machine?

  1. #26
    Super Member craftiladi's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Aussie Quilter
    Because you are not paying for what they do, you are paying for them knowing HOW to do it.
    Having had been in a service biz I certainly understand that but.....where I live its 90.00 just for a cleaning/tune-up and they want to keep the machine for a week or more.

  2. #27
    Super Member adrianlee's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Aussie Quilter
    Because you are not paying for what they do, you are paying for them knowing HOW to do it.
    I agree there, paying them for what they know. Recently had the motherboard go out on my Pfaff. It took a few months waiting for the part to come in from foreign lands to the tune of $324.00, about a 1/3 of that was for labor. Two months ago, had our new flat screen TV go out, lucky for us it was still under warrenty. Tech I talked to said the repair could run over $600 and on up. We won't even talk about car part$.

  3. #28
    Power Poster Sadiemae's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by adrianlee
    Quote Originally Posted by Aussie Quilter
    Because you are not paying for what they do, you are paying for them knowing HOW to do it.
    I agree there, paying them for what they know. Recently had the motherboard go out on my Pfaff. It took a few months waiting for the part to come in from foreign lands to the tune of $324.00, about a 1/3 of that was for labor. Two months ago, had our new flat screen TV go out, lucky for us it was still under warrenty. Tech I talked to said the repair could run over $600 and on up. We won't even talk about car part$.
    Thank goodness I have a brother who is a Ford certified mechanic, or I would be walkig.

  4. #29
    Senior Member quilter41's Avatar
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    Wow my service man charges $45 for cleaning and the top I have seen in my area is $75. They are pricing themselves out of business. That is what is wrong with this country Greed. I call my service man and ask him how busy he is because I drive and hour where ever I go for service. He will tell me if he can get it done in a few hours or not and I arrange to shop and eat lunch with a friend while he does his thing. Guess I am spoiled. Some of my machines he has taught me to care for, but my Vikings he does.

  5. #30
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    Quote Originally Posted by Candace
    The trick to avoid all this is to 1) marry a sewing machine repair man or 2) hope your daughter marries one and you can get family, servicing benefits:>
    Or, if you are at all nimble fingered, go into the sewing machine repair business yourself. LOL
    I think part of the high costs are because to get the tiny little replacement spring in as fast a time as you want/need it the parts supplier charges through the nose and the repair person has to meet his costs and pay for his time etc.

  6. #31
    AbbyQuilts's Avatar
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    I can see both sides to this as my husband is in a service industry and people dont understand why a small cat is more to shave then a lab (thats because cats can and do regularly eat you alive lol)


    But I also think that it is pushing our society into a throw away society.
    If it cost more or more then half to fix it why not just get a new one. The old one goes to the dumps.
    If everyone did that then there would be no more repair man.

    Think about it.
    When was the last time you took a TV to the repair shop or even seen one.
    I know for me that was 10 years ago and the TV was more expensive to repair then to buy a new one.



    Just something to think about.

  7. #32
    Power Poster Sadiemae's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by AbbyQuilts
    I can see both sides to this as my husband is in a service industry and people dont understand why a small cat is more to shave then a lab (thats because cats can and do regularly eat you alive lol)


    But I also think that it is pushing our society into a throw away society.
    If it cost more or more then half to fix it why not just get a new one. The old one goes to the dumps.
    If everyone did that then there would be no more repair man.

    Think about it.
    When was the last time you took a TV to the repair shop or even seen one.
    I know for me that was 10 years ago and the TV was more expensive to repair then to buy a new one.



    Just something to think about.
    There are always two sides to a story.

    (I am thankful I have found a groomer that doesn't charge $20 an hour to groom a poodle. I couldn't afford that. If I could work it would be different.)

  8. #33
    Super Member Rosyhf's Avatar
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    I am trying to figure out what spring you are talking about. I have been sewing all my life and have never had my machines serviced. I take care of them myself. Cleaning and Oiling as needed ...mainly cleaning!!

    I have an old single a 15K, that sews like a top. I paid 75.00 for it years ago. I wouldn't trade my singer for any machine.

    Maybe you could explain the spring to me.

  9. #34
    Power Poster BellaBoo's Avatar
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    I take my Bellaboo to a groomer for a bath and nail clip every month. No grooming and it's $20 including tip.

    The closest machine repairman to me is about 2 hours away so I have to include the price of gas, use of my car, and my time in the repair/service bill. I've only had one problem I couldn't repair myself and the man showed me how to repair it if it happened again. That is a good repairman and I send everyone to him that needs work on their machine.

  10. #35
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    Here is another way to look at it........

    When someone wants to commission you to make a quilt for them and you give them a reasonable price for handcrafting them a nice full size quilt.

    They look at you like your nuts because they could go to Cracker Barrel or BB&B and buy a quilt in a bag for 1/3 of what you just quoted them.

    Your not going to give your work away and your not going to give them the materials at your cost. Your going to mark the price of materials up 10% and charge a fair amount for your labor.

    Why should the guy repairing your sewing machine do it for free and charge half price for parts. You are paying for someones knowledge and expertise in that field just like you would for an auto mechanic, Dentist, Doctor, etc..

    Like I stated earlier I service vintage machines and I charge a very fair price and the work that I do to them is over and beyond the call of duty compared to other sewing machine repair shops. They blow out the dust, oil it up and put on what ever part it needs and there you have it.

    I tear them down to nothing more than just a case and start back from there.

    Kerosene Spa treatments are a standard with me. As I put them back together I am cleaning and polishing every single part on the machine. I set the tension with a gauge top and bottom, and always include a piece of broadcloth with the stitching under the feed dogs to show you that it has been tested and runs like it should. And they never leave my bench without a good final polish!! :-D :-D

    Billy

  11. #36
    Super Member Surfergirl's Avatar
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    I mainly sew on vintage machines, which are mostly Singer and one Necchi Supernova. I usually spend $50 per machine at Estate Sales or Craigslist. I have two newer machines, a Singer and a Brother, but I absolutely love sewing on the vintage machines. I refuse to pay hundreds of dollars to repair a sewing machine. I guess it also depends on what one can afford.

  12. #37
    Senior Member schwanton's Avatar
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    Have you considered ordering the part and putting it in yourself? Check for instructions online - there must be something there! Good luck.

  13. #38
    Super Member Psychomomquilter's Avatar
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    I do ask that too, be cheaper just to buy another sewing machine. But it isnt repairing the machine as the labor cost!
    Anyway thats my thought on the subject.

    and if we could find a good manual to repair our own machines, that would be great. We do it for other things like car, stove, ref, fans, even computer! so why not find a manual for our machines that tell us how to? I am all for it too.

  14. #39
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    You gals are so funny with your responses, that's why I luv this site. Fortunately, I have0several machines and I luv them all I keep them oiled and oay attentin to how they work. I also have found a reasonable repairan here in the atl. Good luck and always get several estimates (but smart quilter know this). Leamelon

  15. #40
    Super Member quilt3311's Avatar
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    Luckily I have a son who is very good at fixing things. He went and replaced a part in my machine and also services it regularly. Beats taking it to a shop. Just cleaning costs us $50 at the shop, but after watching the guy clean it once, (it was a rush job and told him I would wait) told DS what he had done and now he cleans it.

  16. #41
    Super Member grannypat7925's Avatar
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    Sorry you had that problem. I just sent a Singer Futura 900 (from the '50's) in for service. This guy charges flat rate of $70 and completely cleans and tunes the machine. If he sees there are parts needed and it is going to be over $100, he calls. If he doesn't do the work there is no charge. And......he picks up and delivers for no extra charge. I know he is good becuz a friend of mine who used to work for Singer uses him for her machines.

  17. #42
    candiharris11's Avatar
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    One dealer charges $105 and the other $65, so I go to the cheaper one and get the same quality work, thank goodness.

  18. #43
    Super Member quiltmom04's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Aussie Quilter
    Because you are not paying for what they do, you are paying for them knowing HOW to do it.
    Exactly! If it was that easy, everyone could do it!

  19. #44
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    Ohhhh wish you were close to me, I have a gentleman who repairs machines for $25.00 and absorbs the small parts. He does not work on the newer electronic machines, but the older ones. He is a gem and will stand behind his work to boot, if it doesn't work properly bring it back.

    There has to be someone somewhere who will fix it for less than 180.00 surely. Good luck.

  20. #45

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    hi, i'm new here... haven't introduced myself yet, but just wanted to say HI! and also, joann's only carries Singer sewing machines now, except for one White (very) basic beginner's sewing machine. maybe because of the lack of service and parts availability for the White? hhmmm.

    ps: i love this message board, have learned so much from all of you! thanx! :-D

  21. #46
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    Where I work the standard cleaning, adjustment and oiling is $69 for electronic and $59 for manual machines. We encourage customers to tell us what's the ceiling for repair; it the technician feels he's going to hit that ceiling, he doesn't touch it. We often get machines in that,"my husband, the engineer" repaired, almost beyond repair. Sometimes the parts on older machines are not easily accessible and must be special ordered and shipped. Sometimes the parts are no longer made. Often, as in the case of gears, they should be replaced in pairs, and often if one set of gears has deteriorated, so will the remaining ones in a little while. Sometimes, as Lostin51 pointed out a teardown must take place (very time consuming). I recently had a plumber check for a gas leak in my dryer and fix two sinks that were dripping...$538, and my faucets aren't nearly as expensive as my sewing machine. Could I have done it myself? Possibly, but I could also blow up the house and make a bigger problem and still have to call the plumber. Servicing on anything (cars, appliances,sewing machines) does have a cost. I happily pay our technician for my sewing machine repairs (by the way, my sewing machine is worth 3.5 the value of my dryer.

  22. #47
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    I have bernina 830 and paid $89 for a tune-up so thought that was good!

  23. #48

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    HOW MUCH IS IT TO WORK ON A COMPUTER?????YR LOOKING AT $85 JUST THE MINIMUM LOL

  24. #49
    Junior Member salsalady's Avatar
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    i bought a brothers 1250d at xmas, just this month had to take in for repair as i was having trouble threading the machine right for the embroidering. thread bound up inside cost 200. to fix at dealer then another 399.00 for the 3 year maintenance on it. didnt realize they cost so much to fix as i have bought 2 other machines and they never needed repaired, course that was quite a few years back lol. there must be a special way to thread this machine as i got it back and still having a hard time to keep needle threaded. am hoping it doesnt have to go back for tune up for awhile. salsalady

  25. #50
    Super Member Olivia's Grammy's Avatar
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    I guess I am lucky to live where I do. I pay $55 for a general check up on my machines. I try to to take all my machines in every 12 to 18 months. I keep them clean as I can, but I paided alot for them and want to keep them running as efficently as possible. I called yesterday to find out what a maintance check would me on my HQ16 and it's $179. I will willingly pay that and I have to take it to him.

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