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Thread: SURVEY for COMIC BOARD users

  1. #76
    Super Member damaquilts's Avatar
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    I just got in some fabric for a project . Put it on the boards and in my shelves after washing. Nice and neat. And I could find it when I was ready.:-) that is a miracle in my room. Don't think I will be changing again any time soon. This is the 4th or 5th way I have folded my fabric. And the other thing I like is I took the time to measure each piece as I was wrapping it and wrote it on non slick side of the board in pencil so I know how much is on the piece without undoing it each time. No they are not as sturdy as some on the market but neither are they as expensive. I sure can't afford almost $1 each for a board(not at over 300 pieces of fabric) nor can I sit and cut up a bunch of foam board. But they give just enough support to keep it from flopping over ,and the fabric next to it keeps it from falling over. they are tight in my shelf. The only thing I need to find is some way to secure the ends. I used applique pins but they are bent when I take them out and well their straight pins , they poke me and catch on things.

  2. #77
    Senior Member Sewze's Avatar
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    I use the large plastic paper clips that you can get from Staples or Office Depot to hold the fabric on the boards; they come in multiple colors.
    Jinnie

  3. #78
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    This is what I found on the internet. At this time I am continuing to use my comic boards but in the future I may purchase those that are said to be acid free on both sides. I only use 1 board and I have wrapped as much as 7 yards on 1 board.

    This is an excerpt I got off of a comic book site. "What is most important is purchasing archival safe boards (again, there are degrees to this too) ensuring proper care of books for the duration of their storage.Comic book boards have two sides to them: one side is rough and matte, the other side is smooth and glossy. Since boards are only intended to protect one comic, only one side is treated, this is the smooth side of the board. "

    I interpret this to mean that only 1 side is treated to be acid free. I have used these boards myself and never thought about the claims of 'acid free'.

    I then found this link which performed a test of the comic book boards. http://boards.collectors-society.com...Number=4534727. Essentially the results said "In contrast, every single buffered board (E Gerber and Bill Cole) passed the acid-free test - on these boards, both sides were pH neutral (or slightly alkaline), and as these boards are buffered throughout (not coated), the entire board can therefore be considered acid-free.

    Sounds like we need to buy E Gerber's Half-Back,Bill Cole's Thin-X-Tender, or Bill Cole's Life-X-Tender boards to be truly archival safe. Of course this is not what I have.

    Looks like the Bill Cole's are twice as expensive but I found the E Gerber Half back for 9.99 per 100 at comic supply ( sizes/prices vary based on size of comic book).

  4. #79
    Junior Member craftykk's Avatar
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    From my local comic store I found out there are different thicknesses of the boards, some go inside the comic and some are called backing boards which are thicker and make it sturdier, so those are the ones we'd want. i found this on a site he directed me to http://www.comicpreservation.com/

    He said he never recommends the "economy" ones for comics except for very short term use.

    "Acid Free Backing Boards link

    These stiff boards are made of cloth/rags or wood/paper. They are usually a little bigger than the size comic book, they are made to support. These boards are inserted in a mylar sleeve usually in back of a comic book. The board helps supports the comic, to preventing bending the book and also getting creases in it or color breaks on its cover. The acid free nature of these board helps protect the comic book from acid migration found in the aging process of paper.

    Some boards come with a 3% to 4% calcium carbonate buffer at a ph of about 8.00 added to the acid free backing. The idea is to help reduce the amount of environmental pollutes from getting into the comic. Backing boards fall under the area of Archival Board in the field of document preservation and in art presentation as a support product such as mattes."

    They're much cheaper at your local store than amazon, plus you can see them in person and make sure you're getting the ones you want.
    Last edited by craftykk; 03-15-2012 at 06:45 AM.

  5. #80
    Junior Member craftykk's Avatar
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    For me personally, I hope to always be using my fabric continuously and not necessarily storing or collecting it for years so I'm not sure my own concern would be the acid free for super long term storage but I would like it to stand on the shelf without bowing too much or bending too easily. And I'm with whoever it was who said save your money and spend it on fabric, haha..so I think I may keep looking for a free option..like boards from the fabric store, maybe. Not sure yet. Fortunately for me I don't have nearly as much fabric as most of you so whatever I do it won't be as intense at this point. So it's a good time for me to figure out a system. Right now i have mine in bins on a cube shelf from target. I admit it would be nice to have them on the shelf on boards so I don't have to dig through the bin each time to find what I want. But the other thing is I have LOTS of smaller pieces, fat quarters and the like and since I use mine so much I'm not sure it would be time efficient to wrap them so I'd probably keep them in the bins or stack them like some of you have. I don't know yet, too much to think about right now, lol. I might go with the ruler wrapping method some of you have talked about. I wonder if you can even stand them up on a shelf if you have enough to fill a shelf so they aren't falling over?

  6. #81
    Senior Member ksdot417's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by damaquilts View Post
    I just got in some fabric for a project . Put it on the boards and in my shelves after washing. Nice and neat. And I could find it when I was ready.:-) that is a miracle in my room. Don't think I will be changing again any time soon. This is the 4th or 5th way I have folded my fabric. And the other thing I like is I took the time to measure each piece as I was wrapping it and wrote it on non slick side of the board in pencil so I know how much is on the piece without undoing it each time. No they are not as sturdy as some on the market but neither are they as expensive. I sure can't afford almost $1 each for a board(not at over 300 pieces of fabric) nor can I sit and cut up a bunch of foam board. But they give just enough support to keep it from flopping over ,and the fabric next to it keeps it from falling over. they are tight in my shelf. The only thing I need to find is some way to secure the ends. I used applique pins but they are bent when I take them out and well their straight pins , they poke me and catch on things.
    I use bobbi pins. They're pretty cheap and work great.

  7. #82
    Fabriclovr
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    I have fabric that is on carboard and and has been for several years (lets just say 10 and call it good) I unwraped one of the bolts and looked at the fabric.. no problems. I pressed the fabric.. no problems. Then I washed that piece of fabric in hot water.. again, no problems. I just can't understand why so many are rushing to spend money on these boards.

    I also hang anything over 1 yard and anything over 4 goes on the bolts.

    Check out the pictures of my stash and you can see, I have a few yards...

    http://www.quiltingboard.com/members...bums16760.html

  8. #83
    Junior Member sheria's Avatar
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    Thanks for all the great tips am ordering boards today.

  9. #84
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    I've joined the club to get organized with my fabric. I'm hoping this helps me remember to shop my stash instead of going to buy more!! I used "Golden Age" sized comic book boards. I used quilting straight pins to hold them together, but after reading this thread, I'm going to go get some dollar tree bobby pins and use that instead.

    The most I have on one board is about 4 yards. The least is a fat-quarter (folded in half and then wrapping it around the board (the ends barely overlap). I was thinking of cutting some in half and having smaller boards for the fat quarters, but I would prefer to have them all the same size and organized by color, so I'm going to try this approach first.

    For smaller than FQ, I will use clear shoebox plastic totes per color.

    I'm going to store the mini-bolts in large plastic bins .. so they don't get dusty, faded, or covered in cat hair when kitty figures out they would make a comfy bed.

    Now I'm waiting on more boards so I can finish organizing my stash!

    I'm sure it's the OCD talking, but it does make me so happy to see them all lined up by color in such a beautifully organized fashion.

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  10. #85
    Junior Member msariano's Avatar
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    I stopped using the boards I purchased because they take up more room. They made the fabric bulkier on the shelves and I just don't have the room. I just fold the fabric now.

  11. #86
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    I found that the comic boards come in different paper weight or thickness. I've ordered from different sources and some are flimsy and with those I use two or sometime three boards. With the thicker boards just one keeps the fabric upright and doesn't bend. I've since learned to keep the label of the thicker boards so I don't make that mistake again.

  12. #87
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    I started using comic boards several months ago, and have filled up three cabinets -- using approximately 400 boards so far. I use the 7 x 10-1/2 inch boards and they fit my shelves nicely. I put up to three yards of fabric on mine and ruler-fold anything longer than that (and store elsewhere). I also ruler fold my fat quarters. I love how easy it is to access my fabric now. I can see what I have, can cut off what I need, and then replace the fabric on the shelf. The picture is not that great, but you get the idea!

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  13. #88
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    I have a question-- what is a comic board?

  14. #89
    Super Member amcatanzaro's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by P.low View Post
    I have a question-- what is a comic board?
    If you buy a comic book in a comic book shop it tends to come in a plastic bag with an insert. The insert is called a comic board, it helps the book stand up in storage. It's about the same as poster board, weight wise.
    http://www.amazon.com/BCW-Backing-Bo...ic+book+boards
    Anastasia - I like to sew square things.

  15. #90
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    These fabrics looks delicious!

    Quote Originally Posted by carriechelle View Post
    I've joined the club to get organized with my fabric. I'm hoping this helps me remember to shop my stash instead of going to buy more!! I used "Golden Age" sized comic book boards. I used quilting straight pins to hold them together, but after reading this thread, I'm going to go get some dollar tree bobby pins and use that instead.

    The most I have on one board is about 4 yards. The least is a fat-quarter (folded in half and then wrapping it around the board (the ends barely overlap). I was thinking of cutting some in half and having smaller boards for the fat quarters, but I would prefer to have them all the same size and organized by color, so I'm going to try this approach first.

    For smaller than FQ, I will use clear shoebox plastic totes per color.

    I'm going to store the mini-bolts in large plastic bins .. so they don't get dusty, faded, or covered in cat hair when kitty figures out they would make a comfy bed.

    Now I'm waiting on more boards so I can finish organizing my stash!

    I'm sure it's the OCD talking, but it does make me so happy to see them all lined up by color in such a beautifully organized fashion.

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Size:  421.7 KB

  16. #91
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    I saw on here where someone else uses the old cardboard bolts from the fabric store for storage. I too do that. I usually only have around 10 fabrics at a time that I'm using for kids quilts. I usually buy in 3 yard increments. I bring it home, wash it and wrap it on the bolts. It makes it easy for cutting.
    Someone mentioned cutting the cardboard bolt and getting 4. Could you elaborate on that? I'm a little dense. I've been using them full size.
    SVAL

  17. #92
    Super Member LAQUITA's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by quiltmau View Post
    I have to start shopping my stash-I have used 9 packs of the comic book boards and love them. I use one board and have wrapped up to 5 yards of fabric. On less than a half yard I fold and place in shoe box size plastic boxes.
    WOW quiltmau! 9 packs of 100 = 900 pieces of fabric not counting the "less than half yards you fold'. That's a whole lotta fabric!! Can we come shop???
    LaQuita (aka) - Yai-Yai to the most precious grandbaby around of course I'm partial! LOL

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  18. #93
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    I just bought a truckload of comic book boards and am working on getting all my fabric wrapped up. I'm actually really enjoying the process, it's nice to revisit my entire stash.

    I have a lot of half-yard cuts, those just barely wrap around but they do, so I'm using boards for those.

    I've even been putting fat quarters on the boards. Those REALLY just barely wrap, but I have only a few random FQ's so I don't want to come up with a whole separate storage method, I want them in with the rest of the fabric. But I'm thinking of maybe chopping the boards in half so the fabric wraps up thicker (making the fabric easier to see on the shelf, and also making it very obvious it's just a FQ of fabric on the board). I need to dig out my paper cutter and do some experiments - I can't decide if I want to chop them horizontally (short & squat) or vertically (tall & narrow).

  19. #94
    Senior Member 4dogs's Avatar
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    I used poster board from the Dollar Tree store...actually bought a whole box at one time (has, I dunno - hundred maybe) - I then cut them to the two sizes I needed for the width of my cabinets - the llarger ones are for large amounts of fabric, and the smaller ones are from a yard up to about 3 yards.....I LOVE the way they are now, like books at the library shelf......I can get out what I need and not disturb everything else......when they were staacked, the one I wanted was always on the bottom and it messed up the whole stack to get it out.....
    Judy, retired RN, alias 4 dogs and in the mountains of western North Carolina.

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  20. #95
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    I spent time wrapping fabric on 200 boards before I ran out. I just folded the rest on a boards and then pulled out the board. I put it back on the shelves on their sides. I saw a video on how to take them off the shelf by putting a board on each side of selected fabric and then side the one out. It keeps the others from following. When I put it back, I place the fabric between the boards and slide back in. Works to keep it all organized and neat.

  21. #96
    Super Member missgigglewings's Avatar
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    I have used the empty bolts from Hancock Fabrics, but they are too think and take up a lot of room. So, I am back to waiting on my move (to my own place..hopefully this summer) before I purchase the comic boards and do the work required to be organized!

  22. #97
    Super Member Treasureit's Avatar
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    Have any of use used the corrugated plastic sheets and made your own? I did this a few years ago and I think it saved me a lot. I don't know what the comic boards cost now, but you could compare. Here is a home depot link http://www.homedepot.com/p/Unbranded...6-15/202038094 it comes out to $4.60 a sheet...you can make them any size you need.

    It is a little hard to cut in one of the directions...I used an old rotary blade and it was OK...but if you have arthritis in your hands it might be too hard.

  23. #98
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    Quote Originally Posted by Treasureit View Post
    Have any of use used the corrugated plastic sheets and made your own? I did this a few years ago and I think it saved me a lot. I don't know what the comic boards cost now, but you could compare. Here is a home depot link http://www.homedepot.com/p/Unbranded...6-15/202038094 it comes out to $4.60 a sheet...you can make them any size you need.
    I bought comic book boards on Amazon; I bought a 500 pack for $43.74. That comes out to about 9 cents per board. They measure 6.75 x 10.5.

    $4.60 for a sheet that's 24x36...well the sizes don't come out the same but if I went for a 12x7(ish) board, which is about the closest size that would come out evenly, that means 10 boards per sheet for a cost of 46 cents per board.

    So unless I'm doing math wrong, corrugated is a lot more expensive, and then there's all the work of cutting the boards. BUT I bet your corrugated will last a lot longer than my comic book boards and the boards I bought are only acid-free on one side so they're not really great for truly long-term storage. But your corrugated plastic will be entirely acid-free. So there's some benefits to the corrugated, but for what I need (about a thousand boards!), I'm sticking with the cheapies!

  24. #99
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    I bought comic book boards and started this. Then I realized that I had a lot of other quilting stuff and projects in bins that would not fit on regular books shelves. So I bought wardrobe cabinets from IKEA and ruler folded by fabric instead. I would love to have the fabric on end (using the comic book boards) but I share the room with my husband and he was tired of seeing bins/stacks of stuff. So I had to figure out a storage method to hide my stuff. Bookishelves (even with doors) would not have fit in my space and contained all by stuff. The shelves were to deep in the wardrobe cabinet to benefit from standing fabric on end - had to do them 2 deep which defeats the purpose of being able to see them. Maybe in another life when I get a dedicated sewing room.

  25. #100
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    As far as the acid free panic...The fabric to fabric contact is going to still have acid contact so don't panic about one side treatment on the comic boards. Unless you are planning to seal each individual fabric and board in an air tight container it is not going to make any difference in the long run.

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