Welcome to the Quilting Board!

Already a member? Login above
loginabove
OR
To post questions, help other quilters and reduce advertising (like the one on your left), join our quilting community. It's free!

Page 1 of 4 1 2 ... LastLast
Results 1 to 25 of 93

Thread: Not sure what to do with these items I inherited!

  1. #1
    Junior Member mimmy96's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2013
    Location
    Illinois
    Posts
    246

    Not sure what to do with these items I inherited!

    ok, so I inherited a whole craft/quilting room.. a lot of things are older items... Here are a couple I have questions about.... One is of these little bobbin type things.. they are filled with some sort of thread and the "bobbin" is paper... What is this exactly? ... the other are the iron on's... are these to old to use? After awhile do they need to be thrown away... I would say these are really old, but not to sure! Thanks for your help!
    Attached Images Attached Images


  2. #2
    Junior Member mimmy96's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2013
    Location
    Illinois
    Posts
    246
    Not sure if this is something I should hold on to or not!

  3. #3
    Super Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Location
    Central NJ
    Posts
    4,731
    Aunt Martha's transfers are sold currently. Not sure if there is a 'shelf life' on those....try ironing on something to see? If you're into embroidery? The others...hard to tell from the photos. Maybe some type of embroidery thread/ribbon?

  4. #4
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Location
    Parkton, Maryland
    Posts
    222
    Don't know about the iron on transfers, I would say give them a try. The bobbins and spools again don't know what they were used for, but I inherited some of the wooden spools with thread and I just display them in an old mason jar. They look colorful and work well in my sewing room.

  5. #5
    Super Member Rosyhf's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Location
    Longwood, Florida
    Posts
    2,893
    check the thread, pull a strand and if it breaks easily, chuck the lot lol.....

  6. #6
    Super Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2011
    Location
    dallas tx.
    Posts
    4,692
    Blog Entries
    3
    Some of those look like wooden spools. If they are, people collect them.

  7. #7
    Super Member
    Join Date
    Sep 2010
    Location
    Myrtle Beach, SC
    Posts
    6,454
    The 'Iron ons" look like they're for embroidery, which I don't do, so I may be way off base with my suggestion. I suggest trying at least one of the "iron ons" as is to find out if they are still useful as "iron ons". If not, and you like some of the patterns, scan them into your computer and, if you decide to use them can either trace them or print them on iron on fabric. If you have a sewing machine that does embroidery from a pattern, can these patterns be digitized and used that way?

    Spools of thread - looks like you have quite a few threads with wooden spools. Test the thread by seeing how easily it breaks. I'm told that it's no good if it breaks easily. The spools themselves might be worth something to a collector or a crafter!

    Bobbin thread - What size are the bobbins? I know that size "M" bobbins are made and sold for long arms, so that's a possibility. Again, their usefulness is probably dependent on their age.

    Perhaps other, more knowledgable folks on this board can give you better info. At the very least you have some history in your possession!

  8. #8
    Super Member chips88's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2012
    Location
    kershaw,south carolina
    Posts
    1,150
    if those are wooden spools i will take them off your hands?
    ​debra

  9. #9
    Junior Member mimmy96's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2013
    Location
    Illinois
    Posts
    246
    Yes there are several wooden spools... Glad to know people collect them... I know so new to alot of this! I will try out the tread and see if it breaks easy or not!

  10. #10
    Power Poster PaperPrincess's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
    Location
    Michigan
    Posts
    10,492
    Blog Entries
    2
    The iron on transfers are going for $3 to $5 plus shipping on ebay.
    the paper bobbins, are prewound bobbins. Some machines will work with them, some won't. Need to check the strength of the thread. If the thread on the bobbin is OK, but it won't work in your machine, you can use it on the top for piecing or sewing, just like a small spool of thread.
    "I do not understand how anyone can live without one small place of enchantment to turn to."
    Marjorie Kinnan Rawlings

  11. #11
    yel
    yel is offline
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2013
    Location
    1000 miles from nowwhere
    Posts
    665
    Blog Entries
    1
    i am using the paper bobbin things ....they make them for industrial machines .....and the aunt martha transfers work good on color crayon quilts also

  12. #12
    Super Member bjchad's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2010
    Location
    Southern New Jersey USA
    Posts
    1,379
    Some of your spools are from the Belding company who made good quality threads including silk thread. My mother who is now almost 94 used to use heavy weight Belding thread for sewing on buttons when she made clothes and other Belding threads for clothing construction.

  13. #13
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2010
    Posts
    580
    I was a tailor and it looks like silk top stitching thread. You would make the wool suit jacket and then top stitch with silk to make it look professional. Silk is usually very strong. You would not need a lot on a spool just to top stitch so it usually came on the smaller ones. If you find it breaks easily, don't use it. Instead, get an old green canning jar and put all the thread in. Set it on a shelf and enjoy the pretty colors of days-gone-by.

  14. #14
    Super Member cwessel47's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2010
    Location
    Windham, Maine
    Posts
    1,301
    On the wooden ones.... I have a bunch of them from my Great Aunt Sally. Most are silk buttonhole twist. I finally had to go to YouTube to find out how to do handmade buttonholes to use them. It truly is beautiful stuff if you're into that sort of thing! I'm sure you could use it for embroidery as well - with those iron-on transfers. There just isn't much on a each one. And THEN - sell the wooden spools!

  15. #15
    Junior Member mimmy96's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2013
    Location
    Illinois
    Posts
    246
    Well I checked the tread.. And it is all still good.. Does not break easy at all!

  16. #16
    Super Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Location
    Ocean Springs, MS
    Posts
    9,344
    Don't know about the thread and bobbins. When I find old Aunt Martha iron on it copy them then trace them onto muslin. If they are really old the transfers may not come through then you have lost a pattern.

  17. #17
    Super Member kitsykeel's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2010
    Location
    Salisbury, North Carolina
    Posts
    1,018
    I used paper bobbins in my Babylock embroidery machine sometimes.
    Kitsy

  18. #18
    Super Member nunnyJo's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Location
    Fl./ WV
    Posts
    4,542
    Blog Entries
    1
    I also display my old wooden in a jar.

  19. #19
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Posts
    543
    I have a lot of "stuff" that came from my grandmother. One of the things is a Singer sewing book. I plan to make this book the focal point in a shadow box and add some of the wooden spools, buttons (still on the cards) trims (still on the cards), a card with thread color samples, etc etc.

    The Aunt Martha transfers will probably still be good. In my family the women saved all the sugar sacks, flour sacks, etc and turned them into dish cloths or pillow cases. All of these would have had hand embroidery using transfers such as these.
    Nana - Spring, Texas

    Acutally, Barbara; but all teachers and my granddaughters classmates only know "Nana"

  20. #20
    Power Poster gabeway's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Location
    Kansas City, MO
    Posts
    10,488
    Iron one should still work but give it a try. Good luck. Nice collection.
    Wayne & Gabriele, the married quilters.

  21. #21
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2012
    Location
    Carencro LA
    Posts
    291
    Blog Entries
    6
    You can always rewind the thread onto a new bobbin, if the pre-wounds don't work. If you don't have an embroidery machine, you can use the iron-ons and do either hand or free-motion embroidery with them. Some use the liquid embroidery for these also.
    Pat H
    Carencro LA

  22. #22
    dd
    dd is offline
    Super Member dd's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Location
    Maryland
    Posts
    1,744
    The iron ons usually have a little "test" design just for this purpose. I have a large clear lamp that I have a lot of old sewing items in. That way it's useful and holds all that little stuff you don't want to get rid of.
    Blessed are the quilters, for they are the piecemakers.

  23. #23
    Junior Member mimmy96's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2013
    Location
    Illinois
    Posts
    246
    Thanks everyone for your ideas and help!!!! I am in the stages or reorganizing my sewing studio this week... so hopefully I will find a nice place for them! We shall see!!!

  24. #24
    Power Poster RedGarnet222's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Location
    Reno, Nv
    Posts
    14,820
    Here is the thing... Even if the images won't transfer anymore you can use them if you wish. Three other ways I know of are, use a purchased transfer pencil to outline the image and then iron the transfer the same as normal. You can use a light box to transfer them with a regular pencil onto the fabric by tracing around the image. Lastly, you can iron on newly printed images (copies) that you copied from the original pattern. I think you must iron the printed copy within so many minutes for it to work. I am not exactly sure how long it takes to transfer to the fabric. I haven't done it in years. But, it does work, I have done it but, it has been some time ago. Years and years... lol!

    Oh I forgot! You can use the printable sheets of fabric.

    Many years ago, people used to make doll furniture from those wooden spools. Somewhere I have a very old article with some diagrams of how to put them together to make beds, tables and even little doll chairs with them.

    Also they can be all lined up on a nice long board and screwed on to make a coat hanger type holder for the sewing room or workshop. You drill the evenly spaced holes to fit the inside of the spool that the machine screw will fit into, then use a sunken (countersunk) holes that you use larger drill bit to make a hole on the back that the nut will fit down into and onto the machine screw. The shelf will then it will hang flush to the wall. The names of the threads show on the front and give some interest to the little hanger. The metal picture hangers work good to hang them onto the wall on either end of the shelf.
    Last edited by RedGarnet222; 05-07-2013 at 09:06 AM.
    RedGarnet222

    "Take your needle, my child, and work at your pattern ... It will come out a rose by and by. Life is like that ...one stitch at a time, taken patiently."
    *Oliver Wendell Holms

  25. #25
    Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2012
    Location
    Wells, MN
    Posts
    7
    I would try taking them to a retirement community/assisted living housing that hopefully has a manger. They would know if anyone living there still sews and does embroidery. A lot of towns don't carry iron on transfers anymore, you need to order them out of catalogs or on-line and the elderly can't get them. They would love to get their hands on this stuff! Or sometime church circles have elderly ladies that get together to work on quilts for projects, these ladies might be interested in the iron ons and threads. To be honest, hand-sewn embroidery kitchen towels are the SECOND thing I look for at auctions and sales if I am lucky enough to get to one - right behind the FIRST thing I look for- quilts!

Page 1 of 4 1 2 ... LastLast

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

SEO by vBSEO ©2011, Crawlability, Inc.