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Why Does My Bread Fall?

Why Does My Bread Fall?

Old 02-24-2020, 05:25 AM
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Default Why Does My Bread Fall?

I've been on a, "make your own bread kick," now for about 2 months. At first, my bread rose high and mighty and stayed that way in the oven. But lately, it's been rising high while proofing, but then partially falls once it is in the oven. It still tastes good and even has a nice crumb to it, but it's not as high as when I put it in to bake. I can't figure it out. Is the oven too hot? Is the ambient temperature too cold? Do I have enough gluten developed? I'm using a sourdough recipe. Tips and suggestions please.

~ C
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Old 02-24-2020, 07:52 AM
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I'm thinking it might be room temperature, or that you are waiting too long on your second proof. Are you using all sourdough or are you giving an extra yeast boost? The extra yeast may be getting a bit old.

When I lived in Alaska (and now because we keep our house cooler than most because I'm cheap and hubby likes it that way -- the man is a furnace!) I baked weekly and use a large ceramic bread bowl for all the mixing and kneading. I'd heat it up with warm water to start with to make a nice even-to-warm temperature on my hands instead of the initial cold. It's been a long time since I kept a starter going but I used to mess with mine about every 3 days, stirring it or feeding it even though I only actually baked weekly.

Then for my second proof, I'd raise the bread in my dishwasher having run a load until the dry cycle. I didn't actually use heat dry but would quickly pop the formed bread goods in and let rise in the warm moistness of the dish washer.
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Old 02-24-2020, 10:22 AM
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Yeast can also be a problem. If your yeast is to old it will not work as well. I have had that happen before. The bread will taste perfect but will not be as full.
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Old 02-24-2020, 10:51 AM
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If you wait too long after your rise, it will "flatten" in the oven. My yeast rolls have done that.....so I immediately put in the oven after the second rise. Close the oven door carefully. Don't let anyone else slam doors after placing it in the oven and it has started cooking for a while. Make sure your often is at the maximum temp for the recipe before placing it in the oven.
Good Luck, nothing better than homemade bread!
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Old 02-27-2020, 05:17 AM
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Thanks everyone. I think that I may be waiting to put it in the oven. Also, I was making smaller batches, so there is less structure from the dough to hold it up. I made a bigger batch yesterday and it was fine.

The Dishwasher? I never thought of that.

~ C
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Old 02-27-2020, 07:11 AM
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I've used my modern dishwasher to raise dough, but man... those old energy using 1970s dishwashers could do all sorts of things including cooking salmon! Seriously, fillets wrapped in tin foil flat on the top rack with a heat dry cycle.

For another appliance, you ever try one of the cool rise refrigerator dough? They are great for when you have company and want to make something semi-impressive for breakfast. But they are one of those things that is best eaten fresh, gets sad fast.

Maybe should mention that during the 70s my mom taught Home Ec including one called "bachelor's arts" for the guys... one of her good friends worked for the Gas Company doing cooking with gas demonstrations, she was a fantastic fascinating lady! Probably would have a show on the Cooking Channel these days, but back in Alaska in the 1970s she brightened a lot of people's days.

edit: Here's one recipe
https://www.bhg.com/recipe/overnight...gerator-rolls/

I made them like cinnamon rolls but more like the Czech fillings from my father's side, prunes or dates and nuts and things chopped up, so a fusion of my modern stuff with the old stuff.

Last edited by Iceblossom; 02-27-2020 at 07:14 AM.
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Old 02-27-2020, 09:33 AM
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Be careful about the loaf pan - there are two kinds. The kind for meatloaf is wider and the bread will not rise enough - use the narrower kind.
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Old 02-27-2020, 11:54 PM
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I assume you haven't changed pans. I find bread loaves rise and bake better in metal pans, not glass. That's hard for me as I prefer to cook in glass.
I've been making refrigerator rolls. They come out perfect with a nice, silky texture - even in a glass 9x13. I doubt if I have a metal one.
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Old 03-11-2020, 02:10 PM
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just know you should never, ever, leave the house while the bread dough is rising....I used to place mine in a covered bowl on the old gas stove near the old pilot light.....left it one day for probably about an hour....came back...whoops....the dough had super risen and was flowing over the bowl....down the front of the stove and unto the floor....yikes....it was a ghost buster monster!
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Old 03-12-2020, 12:18 PM
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Originally Posted by sewingpup View Post
just know you should never, ever, leave the house while the bread dough is rising....I used to place mine in a covered bowl on the old gas stove near the old pilot light.....left it one day for probably about an hour....came back...whoops....the dough had super risen and was flowing over the bowl....down the front of the stove and unto the floor....yikes....it was a ghost buster monster!
Yuck! You were probably scraping off the dough for days. I let mine rise on the griddle area of my old stove too. I'll keep your advice in mind.

~ C
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