Go Back  Quiltingboard Forums > Recipes
AnY Ideas for Turnip Recipes for a Farberware Convection Turbo Oven? >

AnY Ideas for Turnip Recipes for a Farberware Convection Turbo Oven?

AnY Ideas for Turnip Recipes for a Farberware Convection Turbo Oven?

Old 03-11-2016, 04:31 AM
  #1  
Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Feb 2016
Location: Brick, NJ 08724
Posts: 6
Default AnY Ideas for Turnip Recipes for a Farberware Convection Turbo Oven?

I welcome any ideas on the subject...thanks
sweets is offline  
Old 03-25-2016, 04:35 PM
  #2  
Super Member
 
luv-e's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2010
Location: Southeast Ohio
Posts: 2,584
Default

Have u looked up Farberware for recipes??? Sorry,don't know of any........
luv-e is offline  
Old 03-26-2016, 08:34 AM
  #3  
Power Poster
 
Join Date: Jun 2011
Location: Southern California
Posts: 19,131
Default

I am a city girl and I don't think I have ever eaten a turnip before.
ManiacQuilter2 is offline  
Old 03-26-2016, 09:10 AM
  #4  
Super Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2012
Posts: 1,132
Default

From a long line of Southerners, I can tell you that most of the time they are cut up in chunks and cooked in the pot with the greens and a bit of salt pork. Turnip greens are a prized southern dish, but in Pennsylvania, I was told "we throw those away and eat the turnips. I like to cut one or two up in small chunks and add to soups, especially a chicken taco soup.
One of my favorite recipes is the beef, or pork roast in Mark Sisson's Paleo cookbook. I use a cast iron pot, meat is rubbed with his seasoning mixture, covered with sliced onions, and covered to cook three hours in the oven, first hour covered, second hour uncovered, third hour covered. For the last hour, I cut carrots, potatoes, turnips, parsnips, etc. in chunks and dump that onto the top of the roast, then cover. You could also place the vegetables in a shallow pan or sheet, season, drizzle olive oil, toss and roast. Turnips are also good prepared like mashed potatoes.
Having lived in different areas of the US, I have learned that turnips grown in different soils don't taste the same as those I grew up eating.
elnan is offline  
Old 03-26-2016, 09:58 AM
  #5  
Super Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2010
Location: Chula Vista CA
Posts: 7,143
Default

My mother fixed turnips like you would fix potatoes. We ate them raw if they were fresh, sometimes she would cook them and mash them, she even fried them or baked them like scalloped potatoes. She didn't care for turnip greens so we never had them.
My husband did not care for turnips so my kids have never had them. I used to buy turnips and would eat them raw - like people eat jicama. It does need to be fresh otherwise it is tough and bitter. Also they have gotten rather expensive here so haven't bought any in years.
quiltingcandy is offline  
Old 03-26-2016, 01:36 PM
  #6  
Power Poster
 
Join Date: Jan 2011
Location: Southern USA
Posts: 14,495
Default

I don't know about the cooker you have but I would experiment. I grew up on fresh turnip greens and turnips. They were cut up and boiled and then mashed with butter, salt and pepper. Nothing like fresh pot liquor and fresh baked cornbread. Turnips and greens are loaded with vitamins. All fresh greens have to be cooked a long time to get rid of the yangy flavor. Canned greens taste fine if simmered on low for a long time. If I cook canned, I use one can of seasoned greens with one can of unseasoned greens, add some chopped raw turnips, add chicken broth, bring to boil and then let simmer for at least an hour. My kids and grands were served greens and turnips at a very young age. They all like them and make a big pot all the time. I think it's sad for kids not to be introduced to all the different foods available. How will they know what good food is suppose to tastes like. A box mac and cheese is what most think is good food or processed chicken nuggets. How many have had natural olives that weren't in a jar of vinegar? That is not good olives, you won't know unless you try the good stuff. Okay off my soapbox

Last edited by Onebyone; 03-26-2016 at 01:50 PM.
Onebyone is offline  
Old 03-26-2016, 05:22 PM
  #7  
Super Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2009
Location: South Carolina
Posts: 3,155
Default

My family like turnips oven roasted on stews or soups. Oven roasted is the favorite. Cut into wedges or chucks not to thick, place on a greased baking sheet (use olive oil) Bake about 20 minutes at 410 degrees or until tender. To the same pan we like onions cut into wedges, carrots, tomatoes, potatoes and any other veggie on hand. Garlic is al tasty oven roasted. Turnips greens or any other greens don't take long to cook. Don't over cook they will be bitter. Add a pinch of baking soda to tenderize. I am a true Southern, born and bred in the South.
sewgull is offline  
Old 03-27-2016, 08:17 AM
  #8  
Power Poster
 
Join Date: Jan 2011
Location: Southern USA
Posts: 14,495
Default

I am true hillbilly Southern. Born and raised in the woods of AR. A small garden was an acre. The herb garden was that size. My grandmother had more turnip, mustard, and collard greens growing then she could use. Greens are bitter in taste because they aren't simmered long enough. There is a turning point from wilted, to bitter, to fantastic. We had polk salat which is the most awesome food in the world to me. It's everywhere in the woods here.
Onebyone is offline  
Old 03-27-2016, 10:45 AM
  #9  
Super Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2012
Posts: 1,132
Default

Originally Posted by sweets View Post
I welcome any ideas on the subject...thanks
Sweets, it looks like you have set off a chain of memories with your request. It and the other posts surely have for me.
I have two bookcases of cookbooks, and the ones I went through have much the same as what has been posted here, roasted with other vegetables, sauteed with chunked vegetables in cast iron skillet, or cooked like mashed potatoes. Some of the cookbooks didn't even mention turnips. To me cooked turnips have a sweet, pungent taste that I love, so different than when eating raw. They are good chunked and roasted in the same pan as lamb. So, I'd say go for it, any way you want to try may turn out to be a family favorite.
As did Onebyone, I too grew up in AR off the end of Crowley's Ridge, not far from where the St. Francis empties into the Mississippi. In that wonderful soil there, turnips were just the underground part that held the turnip greens while they grew. Some farmers managed the fields like today's "you-pick". Greens could be harvested several times and grew back from the same root. It was traditional to eat the greens like a spring tonic to cleanse the liver and clear the body of toxins. In my family turnips were just secondary to turnip greens.
elnan is offline  
Old 03-28-2016, 05:26 AM
  #10  
Super Member
 
roguequilter's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2010
Location: over here
Posts: 1,113
Default

Originally Posted by ManiacQuilter2 View Post
I am a city girl and I don't think I have ever eaten a turnip before.
then you need to head to the nearest grocery store/farm market and buy some turnips. everyone should be treated to the delight of turnips! ..i just boil mine. wonderful flavor, sorta sweet.
roguequilter is offline  
Related Topics
Thread
Thread Starter
Forum
Replies
Last Post
Rennie
General Chit-Chat (non-quilting talk)
9
06-30-2016 08:43 AM
Annaquilts
Recipes
17
05-16-2015 02:55 PM
cindyb
General Chit-Chat (non-quilting talk)
34
01-06-2014 11:14 PM
dreamgirl
General Chit-Chat (non-quilting talk)
63
10-11-2011 09:25 AM
May in Jersey
General Chit-Chat (non-quilting talk)
41
12-03-2009 08:01 AM

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is On
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


FREE Quilting Newsletter