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  • I'm the excited new owner of treadle machine- first timer ;)

  • I'm the excited new owner of treadle machine- first timer ;)

    Old 06-11-2018, 08:03 AM
      #11  
    KLO
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    Nice find and she's a beauty! All you need is a bit of co-ordination and practice. Have fun learning to sew on a treadle.
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    Old 06-11-2018, 08:35 AM
      #12  
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    Thank you
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    Old 06-11-2018, 09:56 AM
      #13  
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    Looks like it's a back clamp from the accessories. I thought they only had back clamps the first couple of years of production (1900,-)?

    Either way, it looks very good. There is presser bar coverter available if you have side clamp attachments like buttonholer or picoting stitcher, or any basic low shank foot you like to use.

    It should clean up nicely, you can gently polish it with a resin type polish for cars (the liquid type). Slide the bobbin cover completely off; if there's a lift up lever (slightly up and towards you) it will release the bobbin case for cleaning. If so don't touch the screw in center there, it will cause a lot of fuzz with thread tension and getting parts in alignment again. If there's only a bracked with a screw, it's the earlier type, and the scew is meant to come off.

    Last edited by Mickey2; 06-11-2018 at 10:00 AM.
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    Old 06-11-2018, 10:08 AM
      #14  
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    Big sewing machine stores may carry treadle belts. You will need to shorten it and then punch a hole in it for the staple to go through. Be careful with the hole and don't have skin on the other side of the belt.
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    Old 06-11-2018, 05:12 PM
      #15  
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    Sssshhhhh, don't tell my sister, but I kept the underbraider as I think they are neat. It works kind of like bobbin work. You stitch from the back side of the fabric. I think it works well with soutache and mini rick rack. The underbraider does not work well with metallic soutache, as the edges of the metal catch on the attachment. I also read https://vintagesewingmachinesblog.wo...-underbraider/ that it will clean out your feed dogs if you use white on white.

    I haven't watched this https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7zIG9PEz4eE

    Have fun.


    Janey - Neat people never make the exciting discoveries I do.
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    Old 06-12-2018, 03:37 AM
      #16  
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    Originally Posted by OurWorkbench
    Sssshhhhh, don't tell my sister, but I kept the underbraider as I think they are neat. It works kind of like bobbin work. You stitch from the back side of the fabric. I think it works well with soutache and mini rick rack. The underbraider does not work well with metallic soutache, as the edges of the metal catch on the attachment. I also read https://vintagesewingmachinesblog.wo...-underbraider/ that it will clean out your feed dogs if you use white on white.

    I haven't watched this https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7zIG9PEz4eE

    Have fun.




    Janey - Neat people never make the exciting discoveries I do.
    Very cool. Thank you!!!
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    Old 06-12-2018, 03:41 AM
      #17  
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    Originally Posted by Mickey2
    Looks like it's a back clamp from the accessories. I thought they only had back clamps the first couple of years of production (1900,-)?

    Either way, it looks very good. There is presser bar coverter available if you have side clamp attachments like buttonholer or picoting stitcher, or any basic low shank foot you like to use.

    It should clean up nicely, you can gently polish it with a resin type polish for cars (the liquid type). Slide the bobbin cover completely off; if there's a lift up lever (slightly up and towards you) it will release the bobbin case for cleaning. If so don't touch the screw in center there, it will cause a lot of fuzz with thread tension and getting parts in alignment again. If there's only a bracked with a screw, it's the earlier type, and the scew is meant to come off.
    You were right. I took a photo of her serial number and looked again at ISMACS, and the manufacture date is 9/15/1910. Model 27
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    Old 06-12-2018, 04:23 AM
      #18  
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    Oh, something is not right, it's definitely a 66 and a back clamp. Sometimes the embossing of the serial number is bit of a guess work, other times it just need cleaning and good light to be read. There's no hurry and it will be sorted out eventually.
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    Old 06-12-2018, 04:25 AM
      #19  
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    Originally Posted by JanelleTrebuna
    You were right. I took a photo of her serial number and looked again at ISMACS, and the manufacture date is 9/15/1910. Model 27
    No, your machine is not a 27. I'm thinking there were probably more mistakes in the "G" serial numbers, but there were a lot of them. I know I saw a 66-1 in a thrift store and knew of the problems. I unfortunately did not take a picture of the serial number and machine. I looked at serial number and checked several times and different numbers (like 7 instead of 1 or 3 instead of 8 & checking the number of digits) and kept coming up with serial number for a 27 when I knew the machine was a 66. I also know that I have had trouble with other serial numbers, but sometimes you get lucky and have some paper work that has the serial number printed on it.

    According to http://www.ismacs.net/singer_sewing_...sses-1-99.html the 66-1 (back clamp) was made until 1923.

    Neat that you got the manual, too.

    Janey - Neat people never make the exciting discoveries I do.
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    Old 06-12-2018, 04:39 AM
      #20  
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    Thanks all. Sorry I am new to this vintage/antique machine thing but really wanting to learn and loving my new machine. This is my serial number:
    Attached Thumbnails ellies-serial-number.jpg  
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