Sewing Machine Work Stand

Old 05-06-2015, 08:11 AM
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Default Sewing Machine Work Stand

I was asked by a kind reader for additional pictures of the work stand that was used in the recent White Rotary 41 post. It took a little time, but here are a few.

Some time ago, I wondered if there couldn't be an easier way to hold and work on sewing machine heads. I poked around on the internet and didn't find anything for that purpose. I asked a few people who are interested in sewing machines and no one knew of such a device.

So I built what I was imagining. The stand balances the sewing machine head and allows easy rotation to any position desired. It is then locked in place. One finger can rotate the machine.

(Stand - Upright)
stand2upright.jpg

Since I'm still working with the White Rotary, I've used it as the example machine in these pictures. But it works with any classic mount machine that uses a stepped cutout. A few baseboards with different sized cutouts adapt the stand for various machines as needed.

The upside down position works well for oiling the underside parts. Having the bottom tilted forward and up makes for easy inspection and cleaning. With all moving parts in the clear, the machine can be run in any position.

(Stand - Tilted Positions)
stand2tilted.jpg

The same balance that helps to provide easy horizontal rotation, also works in the vertical direction. The machine may be stood on end, if desired.

(Stand - On End)
stand2endup.jpg

Any thoughts or comments are welcome.
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Old 05-06-2015, 08:35 AM
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hmmmmm.. Pondering before longer reply.... Very cool regardless!
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Old 05-06-2015, 08:51 AM
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Neat - I'm going to need one of those for my machine workroom! I know my DH will read this - so honey- add this to your "honey do" list please
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Old 05-06-2015, 10:20 AM
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Thanks for those pictures. That is a slick setup and a smart design. It's obvious you put some serious thought into it. It's a whole lot nicer than flipping a machine around on a table or workbench. I have a feeling you're going to see several copies being made.

One more thing to add to my to-do list.
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Old 05-06-2015, 11:22 AM
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This is sweeter than candy! I've got to have one of those.

Cari

Last edited by QuiltnNan; 05-28-2015 at 01:17 AM. Reason: language
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Old 05-06-2015, 11:57 AM
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I don't work on antique machines but if I did, I would want one! Ingenious!
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Old 05-06-2015, 01:57 PM
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pretty sure this is going on the " I probably really should have one of these but may be to lazy to build " list. It really would make a lot of things nice for me.
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Old 05-06-2015, 04:48 PM
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That is such a great idea. Ever thought of marketing it?
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Old 05-06-2015, 04:59 PM
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That's pretty fabulous! Sure beats the heck out of using a big bean bag.

I agree, about marketing it. I bet you'd get some buyers.
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Old 05-06-2015, 05:54 PM
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Wow, fantastic. What I could get accomplished with that baby!

How is it actually held in. I see wing nuts. Is the base 2 layers? Do the uprights have the holes to allow for height adjustments, such as for spending lots of time cleaning the top of the head?

What is the bottom circle for?

Thanks for sharing.
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