Transporting Sewing machine

Old 02-20-2022, 11:55 AM
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Default Transporting Sewing machine

Hi everyone,
I have a 1950's Singer Sewing machine attached to a table. The machine drops down into the table. I need to take it in for service but I can not stand it up in my car. Would it hurt the machine to lay it on its side to transport a few miles back and forth?

Thank you so much!
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Old 02-20-2022, 12:03 PM
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Welcome to QB.

Most of us would remove the machine from the table before transporting. There is a website that shows how to do that at https://oldsingersewingmachineblog.c...single-handed/ Most of that era of Singer machines can be self serviced. What model of machine is it? Why do you need to take it in for service?

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Old 02-20-2022, 12:08 PM
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I agree with Janey, unless I can stand the table in it's normal, upright position, I remove the machine, and even then.... If you're not comfortable servicing it yourself, and the wiring doesn't present a problem in removing the machine from the table, your shop should be able to service the machine without it being in the table, or you could check with them first.
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Old 02-20-2022, 12:48 PM
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Thank you for the quick responses and information! This machine belonged to a family member and was well used and well loved. It has been in storage for many years and it has come to me now. There is dried oil all over the machine and it is very dirty. The machine itself is seized up when you turn it on. I do not know how to service it myself but there is a place near by my home that services vintage machines. I would be willing to learn how to work on it myself but it does seem daunting.
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Old 02-20-2022, 01:03 PM
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I am in the middle of working on this same model, and not successful so far. I would not want to tackle one for my first vintage machine project, but that's just me. It's from a family member, does it have sentimental value? Do you plan on using it?

If it is serviced correctly and made to work, then it would be a fine machine, lots of versatility. The cosmetic work you should be able to do, the one I'm banging may head against was pretty disgusting, but I used Gojo and a scrubby pad, looks OK now. Other people may recommend other cleaning approaches.

Check with your service person, see what they charge. I am near St Louis and it's $100 to have someone touch a machine; I know one person who starts at $50, outside of the city.

I would want to get it in mechanical working order before tackling the cosmetics.

If you decide to remove it from the table, which you will want to do whether you service it yourself or take it in, there are two set screws, one on each hinge, visible when you lift it up out of the table on onto the back; loosen the screws, but not all the way out. The foot pedal probably slides into a bracket inside the table and can be slid out of the bracket. The cords should unplug from the right side of the machine.
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Old 02-20-2022, 01:23 PM
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Thank you for the pictures.

I tend to agree with Joe on this one. There is a rather long thread that Stitchnripper started about a 401 and got going and working well. https://www.quiltingboard.com/vbulle...e-t216956.html There is a site about getting (think there is something in QB thread, too) the knobs unstuck at https://archaicarcane.com/stuck-in-t...lant-o-matics/

The slant shank machines like this one is, like to be used on a regular basis. A manual for your machine can be found at https://res.cloudinary.com/singer-se...ng_Machine.pdf

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Old 02-20-2022, 01:30 PM
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Thank you Janey for the resources! The old singer sewing machine blog is great!

JoeJr - This does have sentimental value and I would love to be able to use it. I have a modern sewing machine but I learned on a very old singer and would love to keep this if I can get it working. Thank you for the advice that this might not be the best project for a beginner! I think I will talk to the service person for the actual maintenance and then I can attempt the cosmetic stuff after it is working.
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Old 02-21-2022, 07:23 AM
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Welcome to the QB from SE Michigan. I am glad you jumped right in with a question. I tried doing what you are proposing 'once' and never again once I discovered how easy it is to take the machine head out of the cabinet. Leave the table home and just take the machine itself into the shop. Again welcome to the QB!
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Old 02-21-2022, 10:53 AM
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Good luck with it. The 401 is one of my favorites. I've "unstuck" two so far.

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Old 02-21-2022, 11:05 AM
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I understand your attachment to the machine. When my mother asked me what I wanted when she died, without thinking I said her sewing machine. It's a 1950 Singer 15-91 in the cabinet. She laughed and told me to just take it - she hadn't sewn on it for years and said she couldn't even thread it anymore. (She was a wonderful sewist.). I keep it clean and oiled thanks to the site. So it hasn't seen a repairman over 15 years.
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