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Thread: Treadling - one foot or two?

  1. #1
    Senior Member pinkCastleDH's Avatar
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    Treadling - one foot or two?

    I've been experimenting with both and so far I'm much smoother one footed (which is the same way you'd use a treadle lathe since you'd be standing while using it, but it has a larger throw so it's more of a knee action.) I've seen some videos that suggest two feet, however. For those of you who treadle, how do you do it?

  2. #2
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    I use two.

  3. #3
    Super Member crafty pat's Avatar
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    I learned to sew on my Mothers and used it until I married and bought my 401A. I was taught to use two and all those I ever saw using one also used two.

  4. #4
    Super Member Belfrybat's Avatar
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    Definitely use two feet. You'll wear out your knee using just one. I learned to sew on a treadle when I was 8 and my stepfather wired two wood blocks to the treadle so I could reach it. I stupidly gave my treadle machine away 15 years ago when I moved to a small house and have regretted it every since. Can't afford one now.

  5. #5
    Senior Member pinkCastleDH's Avatar
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    Sounds like I should work on two-footing it. I'm not over worried about wearing myself out - the range of motion is much smaller than I get with bicycle cranks and I can do that for hours on end - but I'd rather get good at doing it right just as a matter of habit.

  6. #6
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    I have 2 feet on the platform. My right foot on the back right corner and my left toe on the left corner kitty corner from the right foot. Once I start it with my hand with the hand wheel, a light push with my right foot keeps it going and the toe taps the front to keep it in motion.

  7. #7
    Super Member Glenn's Avatar
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    I use my right foot and my left foot as a control, brake so to speak and I go for hours piecing.
    Glenn W. Cleveland

  8. #8
    Super Member Stitchnripper's Avatar
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    Usually two.

  9. #9
    Super Member J Miller's Avatar
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    I usually use one, the left. I have spinal problems that makes my right side weaker and have less stamina than the left. I'm also fairly plump, picture the Pillsbury Dough Boy or the Michelin Man trying to get both fat legs under the table. So I use the left foot mostly. I do try to use both occasionally, but the left leg is dominant and the right leg fatigues faster, so the left is doing all the work anyway, so I just use one.

    Joe

  10. #10
    Junior Member Kittywolf13's Avatar
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    I usually use one, but am new to the whole treadling thing. My W&G cabinet is very narrow and I am apperantly not so narrow so it's hard to fit both legs in there. When I do I usually have to sit a bit at an angle. I do use two though because since it doesn't have a permanent spot in the house yet it scoots across the floor becaus I havent put anything under the wheels. (and the machine is so small and light it adds no weight at all to the cabinet!) I also use two to start and stop the treadle but once I get going its usually one. I'm still learning and two works well too.
    Proud owner of: Eleanor, a 1896 Willcox & Gibbs Chain Stitch Treadle; Tucci, a 1952 Singer Featherweight; my mothers Singer Touch & Sew 758; Brother XR 6060
    1910 Singer 66; Singer 99K Shadow, 1929 Singer 128 (currently w/hand crank)

  11. #11
    Super Member J Miller's Avatar
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    Kittywolf,

    Go to a hardware store and buy a package of the rubber cup things you put under furniture so it doesn't ruin floors. They'll help keep your treadle in one place.

    Joe

  12. #12
    Senior Member cmrenno's Avatar
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    I am a fairly new "treadler" and I watched You Tube Videos to learn how to treadle. Most videos show the two feet method. Would you believe that there are people who treadle in their bare feet!

    Colleen

  13. #13
    Junior Member Kittywolf13's Avatar
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    Joe, it's on my list of things to do. Haha!
    Proud owner of: Eleanor, a 1896 Willcox & Gibbs Chain Stitch Treadle; Tucci, a 1952 Singer Featherweight; my mothers Singer Touch & Sew 758; Brother XR 6060
    1910 Singer 66; Singer 99K Shadow, 1929 Singer 128 (currently w/hand crank)

  14. #14
    Senior Member pinkCastleDH's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by cmrenno View Post
    I am a fairly new "treadler" and I watched You Tube Videos to learn how to treadle. Most videos show the two feet method. Would you believe that there are people who treadle in their bare feet!

    Colleen
    Colleen - I think barefoot would actually help quite a bit. It would be easier to detect subtle motions when starting out to make sure it's all going the right direction to start with. The only problem I see with it would be cold feet from the cast iron's conductivity. Given that I'll probably try stocking footed next.

  15. #15
    Super Member J Miller's Avatar
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    So, if the treadle plate is cold, make a pad to go over it. Something to practice on while you get the hang of treadling.

    Joe

  16. #16
    Senior Member pinkCastleDH's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by J Miller View Post
    So, if the treadle plate is cold, make a pad to go over it. Something to practice on while you get the hang of treadling.

    Joe
    Not a bad idea. Not very thick because I want to pick up on small motions but no reason not to do a simple pad. Thanks!

  17. #17
    Super Member Glenda m's Avatar
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    I'm a two footer. LOL
    You can get older, but you never have to grow up! Tomorrow's just a future yesterday!-Greg Fergerson

  18. #18
    Super Member Annaquilts's Avatar
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    Two feet. There is a video online that shows it. I just knew from when I was a little kid and I treadled on my grand mother's Pfaff. One foot on the front and one higher up.
    Anna Quilts

  19. #19
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    Two feet for me! I don't think I'm coordinated enough to do it with one!

  20. #20
    Super Member quiltjoey's Avatar
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    2 feet, bare so I can "feel" the motion better. Can use shoes. Using 1 foot is more tiring to me...

  21. #21
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    Joe,

    Be on the lookout for a set of irons from an industrial machine. A universal top on it with a household cut out and you are good to go. All of my regular treadles are in the 19" range inside leg to leg measurement and my industrial 31-20
    measures in at 25 1/8". That extra 6 inches really helps for those who are horizontally challenged. VBG

    Cathy



    Quote Originally Posted by J Miller View Post
    I usually use one, the left. I have spinal problems that makes my right side weaker and have less stamina than the left. I'm also fairly plump, picture the Pillsbury Dough Boy or the Michelin Man trying to get both fat legs under the table. So I use the left foot mostly. I do try to use both occasionally, but the left leg is dominant and the right leg fatigues faster, so the left is doing all the work anyway, so I just use one.

    Joe
    Cathy

    "Most sewing machine problems are due to the carbon based unit in the chair in front of the machine"

  22. #22
    Senior Member sewnbug's Avatar
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    Two. Left is in back and right is in front.

  23. #23
    Super Member J Miller's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mizkaki View Post
    Joe,

    Be on the lookout for a set of irons from an industrial machine. A universal top on it with a household cut out and you are good to go. All of my regular treadles are in the 19" range inside leg to leg measurement and my industrial 31-20
    measures in at 25 1/8". That extra 6 inches really helps for those who are horizontally challenged. VBG

    Cathy
    Cathy,
    Thanks for the info. I've been on the lookout for something along those lines to make a MUT. But so far nothing has shown itself.

    Joe

  24. #24
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    I use both feet. Left toes at the back Right foot to the front. This gives me better rhythm and it runs along smoothly. I also wear soft shoes.

  25. #25
    Senior Member pinkCastleDH's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by J Miller View Post
    Cathy,
    Thanks for the info. I've been on the lookout for something along those lines to make a MUT. But so far nothing has shown itself.

    Joe
    Joe - I haven't checked it out myself but I think I read on the Treadleon website that the White cabinets are wider and position the needle directly in front of you instead of to the left of center.

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