Welcome to the Quilting Board!

Already a member? Login above
loginabove
OR
To post questions, help other quilters and reduce advertising (like the one on your left), join our quilting community. It's free!

Page 1 of 2 1 2 LastLast
Results 1 to 25 of 33

Thread: How to start treadling in the right direction

  1. #1
    Super Member jeanharville's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Location
    Saratoga, Arkansas
    Posts
    1,898

    How to start treadling in the right direction

    I'm having a hard time learning to start treadling in the forward direction. Is there a right position for the treadle to be in or a certain way/order to use my feet? Whatever I'm doing makes the sewing go in reverse. If any of you have some tips or techniques you use to smoothly start sewing on your treadle, please share them with me.

    Thanks, jean
    jean

  2. #2
    Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Posts
    6
    Take a hold of the wheel- beside you, pull it forward. Not the treadle wheel, The wheel will be felt by the feet, the direction of the forward thrust to rock the peddle. It is easer to use both feet. I'm speaking from memory, I learned on a treadle. At 13 brings back memories. Theresse

  3. #3
    Super Member jeanharville's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Location
    Saratoga, Arkansas
    Posts
    1,898
    Theresse, your advice has helped a lot. I'm still having trouble starting from a dead stop. I'm trying to fingure out if there is an optimal position to leave the treadle so that the next start will be easier. If any of you who treadle often have and tips they would be greatly appreciated. I am continuing to practice with no thread in the bobbin or top. I'm determined to master this. Thanks for any help.
    jean
    jean

  4. #4
    Moderator Up North's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Location
    North East Lower peninsula of Michigan
    Posts
    6,156
    To start again you have to remember the whyat your machine goes some you pull the wheel towards you some push it away from you once you get it it is easy.

  5. #5
    Super Member jeanharville's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Location
    Saratoga, Arkansas
    Posts
    1,898
    Up North, thanks for the encouraging words. I am getting a little smoother and am paying close attention to the treadle. I have another question. It seems like the treadle might be a little tight. Do I need to tighten the belt or loosen it?
    jean

  6. #6
    Moderator Up North's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Location
    North East Lower peninsula of Michigan
    Posts
    6,156
    If it is tight I would think you have to loosen it a bit

  7. #7
    Super Member misseva's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Location
    East Arkansas
    Posts
    2,425
    Blog Entries
    3
    I was having trouble until I changed from my 'rocker' type tennis shoew to my slip on house shoes. I think the heel was too high for me to treadle. Made a big difference when I went to flat soled shoes. And I always start out turning the hand wheel todard me.
    TwandasMom

  8. #8
    Super Member jeanharville's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Location
    Saratoga, Arkansas
    Posts
    1,898
    Well, I hate to admit to being an idiot, but the reason the treadle felt a little tight was that I had the bobbin winder engaged. As soon as I released it, the treadle worked great. I've always thought I was born about 100 years too late, but I doubt that I could have managed all the manual dexterity those times called for; not to mention the heavy hard work. But I do sometimes day-dream about quilting bees and church "dinners on the ground". I can barely remember them. But those were still happening in the 40s in rural Arkansas where I was raised.
    jean

  9. #9
    Super Member jeanharville's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Location
    Saratoga, Arkansas
    Posts
    1,898
    Misseva, your right about the shoes. I first had on tennis shoes. I took those off and just used bare feet and I could feel the relationship between the hand wheel on top and the treadle below thanks to theresse's advice. But that was cold and a little uncomfortable, so I slipped my house shoes on and that seems to work OK. Thanks for mentioning it.
    jean

  10. #10
    Power Poster
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Location
    Ontario, Canada
    Posts
    30,832
    I does treadle easier with the bobbin winder away from the wheel. I always start the motion with a push/pull of the hand wheel to start the right motion. I keep the toe of my left foot on the front of the treadle shelf and part of my right foot at the top or back of the shelf. Once you get the motion down you can make it fly. Good luck and keep treadling!

  11. #11
    Junior Member Diamondrose's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
    Location
    The Bluegrass State
    Posts
    194
    I put my right toes on the front of the treadle left foot on the back. I give the hand wheel a spin to get it started (the hand wheel goes away from me on mine) then just go with the flow of the treadle with my feet when it starts moving. Either bare feet or socks - there is no way I can sew with shoes on unless I am using a knee pedal.

  12. #12
    Power Poster miriam's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Location
    Victorian Sweatshop
    Posts
    15,409
    Blog Entries
    2
    How do you keep it from pausing?
    NEVER let a sewing machine know you are in a hurry.

  13. #13
    Super Member jeaninmaine's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Location
    Maine, Where else!
    Posts
    1,575
    I'm so glad someone started this thread. I've been curious as heck about how to get this one I have going.

  14. #14
    Super Member great aunt jacqui's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2010
    Location
    new hampshire
    Posts
    1,569
    Also wanted to know how to keep this going. Had my DH put on a new belt.....it did not work well...had to keep cutting to fix it....got too short. bought another one. any hints on doing this. jacqui
    always give back and forward

  15. #15
    Power Poster miriam's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Location
    Victorian Sweatshop
    Posts
    15,409
    Blog Entries
    2
    I think maybe sew-classic had directions on her site
    NEVER let a sewing machine know you are in a hurry.

  16. #16
    Junior Member DeAnne-Mn.'s Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2011
    Location
    Madison Lake,Mn.
    Posts
    275
    Blog Entries
    4
    Thank you for all the suggestions. I have a treadle not yet used. I learned as a kid from my grandmother and that was Many years ago [ I feel older than dirt, LOL ]. I have learned so much from this Board and love every part of it.
    DeAnne

  17. #17
    Junior Member Diamondrose's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
    Location
    The Bluegrass State
    Posts
    194
    Quote Originally Posted by miriam View Post
    How do you keep it from pausing?
    Not sure what you mean by keeping it from pausing - but once you get it started with the hand wheel (your feet will be resting where you want them on the pedal as you do that) and immediately pick up on that movement with your feet and keep going it shouldn't stop until you stop it. Just guessing the foot action might not be real smooth and that is why it is pausing.

    Hope this helps.
    Last edited by Diamondrose; 01-28-2012 at 08:42 AM.

  18. #18
    Super Member duckydo's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2009
    Location
    Pleasant Hill MO
    Posts
    1,675
    Blog Entries
    1
    I have never sewn on a treadle so I am anxious to read the answers to this, I never thought about that b4

  19. #19
    Power Poster miriam's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Location
    Victorian Sweatshop
    Posts
    15,409
    Blog Entries
    2
    nope not very good foot action - I have a couple old foot injuries though - I can ride a bike. I can chew gum and walk. I can't keep the treadle going smoothly.
    NEVER let a sewing machine know you are in a hurry.

  20. #20
    Junior Member Diamondrose's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
    Location
    The Bluegrass State
    Posts
    194
    Quote Originally Posted by miriam View Post
    nope not very good foot action - I have a couple old foot injuries though - I can ride a bike. I can chew gum and walk. I can't keep the treadle going smoothly.
    Don't give up! If you can ride a bike you can treadle. I gave a treadle to a friend of mine a couple months ago when he expressed interest in getting a sewing machine. He has one ankle where the bone is fused so there is no movement at all in that ankle and he can use a it. He is working on his second quilt using it.

    Another thought might be that the belt is too tight, they take very little pressure to keep it moving if the belt is not too tight. If the belt is too tight it can be a workout to keep it going.

  21. #21
    Super Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2010
    Location
    Joplin, Missouri
    Posts
    1,061
    Blog Entries
    1
    Such an interesting thread... I have a treadle in my storage unit.. It's beautiful, but I've never used really used it. Now I'm curious as to whether I can sew with it or not.. I'm thinking it would be a wonderful machine to use when I'm up in the night.. I'm guessing it makes very little noise as you use it.. I wanna go get my treadle... bet DH would roll his eyes at me if I told him what I want to do!
    http://signatures.mylivesignature.co...AC3300A534.png Life is good when you're busy with babies.

  22. #22
    Super Member jeanharville's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Location
    Saratoga, Arkansas
    Posts
    1,898
    Thanks again for all your comments and I hope everyone who treadles will report their experience with sewing. I even have a buttonhole attachment for mine. I hope to get fast enough and smooth enough to use it.
    jean

  23. #23
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Location
    Boston
    Posts
    226
    When I learned to use a machine, (before the dawn of time) electric or treadle, you never started from a dead stop -- you had to pull the wheel forward. That is what the wheel was for. I still tend to start that way even though it is not necessary and the wheel is not as easy to grab ahold of. Although it is a bit buried, my hand just goes there when I start. My Mom would never have allowed otherwise as the treadle would go backward, and the electric would just sort of balk or stall.
    My mother's electric machine from the 1920's is still in use as is the treadle we had at the cottage where the electicity was unreliable and new school clothes were made in August. Being able to make the treadle work (go forward) was always a thrill for my children.

  24. #24
    Power Poster miriam's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Location
    Victorian Sweatshop
    Posts
    15,409
    Blog Entries
    2
    I too have that habit of pulling the wheel to start - maybe that is what I hate about the newer machines - nothing to grab...
    NEVER let a sewing machine know you are in a hurry.

  25. #25
    Super Member J Miller's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2012
    Location
    NE Indiana
    Posts
    8,104
    Jean, and others,

    I currently ( subject to change without notice ) have three functional treadle machines and two under repair.

    Functional ones are:
    >Singer Treadle #1: 66-4 circa 1919 in a 5 drawer cabinet. Complete, original, and cranky as all get out. It was a gift from my late cousin. Sat in storage for 12 years before I decided to learn to use it about 4 four months ago.

    >Singer Treadle #2: 66-4 circa 1924 in a 7 drawer cabinet. Came to me as a machine that had been electrified many decades ago. When I got it the electrical wire was petrified and disintegrating. And the motor had long been removed.
    So I converted back to treadle. NOT an easy job as finding the parts is difficult. I got the parts from members of "The Sewing Forum" before the hackers killed it. Some from Iowa and some from Australia.

    >Franklin 1911: This one's in a parlor cabinet and came to me semi complete but with severe water damage to the bottom of the cabinet. Now fixed.

    OK, having said that here is some things I've learned.

    >>Belts:
    They stretch like a rubber band at first. Instructions say to pre-stretch them then cut and instal them. My experience is that I put them in where it feels good, gently crimp the wire connector and then treadle the daylights out of the machine. In very little time you'll need to shorten the belt. Less time if you are actually sewing with them, and ever less time if you fill a lot of bobbins on the machine. That bobbin winder puts a lot of load on the treadle belt.
    My #1 treadle took three adjustments to get it not to slip.
    The #2 is on adjustment #1.
    The Franklin is on adjustment #3.
    Now, here's how I adjust the belts. When the belt starts slipping I get my Dremel tool out and put in a very small 1/16" diameter burr, and with the belt still attached to both wheels I make a hole the same distance from the existing hole as the distance from the end of the belt to the existing hole. Maybe a quarter inch. Then I cut the belt and put the connector in the new hole. This way I can adjust it until it quits stretching without it getting too short. Shortening the belt a 1/4" will make a big difference.

    >>Singer metal pitman shaft assemblies:
    My number one machine will stall at the blink of an eye. To get it to move at all I have to turn the hand wheel.
    It aggravates me no end. I cannot get the machine to rotate forwards with the treadle. It will always go backwards.

    The Franklin is a lot better. I can glance at the hand wheel, twitch the treadle and know which way it's going to go. Then work the treadle accordingly.

    The #2 Singer is a dream. I can get the machine running almost every time with just the treadle plate.

    The problem is I believe in the pitman rod assembly. Let me explain.

    On the bottom of the pitman rod is a large nut affair with a ball socket in it that fits into the hole in the upper right corner of the treadle plate. On my #1 machine I took this apart, cleaned it and lubed it then fought to get it tight enough to not clunk but loose enough to move freely. It sill will not run slowly or start correctly.

    When I returned the #2 treadle to a treadle I got the pitman rod assembly from Australia. It is a Chinese reproduction but it's all I could find. In the bottom of the big nut is a spring loaded plunger. This plunger allows the plate to move a bit when the pitman rod and the big wheel crank shaft is in a direct line. With the ability to compress the treadle can overcome the tendency to lock up and not start, or stall and then want to rotate backwards.

    When I had the big nut assembly apart on my #1 treadle I did not see this plunger assembly. I hope it's just stuck in the bottom of it's hole, if so I can fix it. If not I'll have to fabricate one.

    It's my theory, yet to be proven, this one little unseen part is what will cause some Singer treadles to run great, and some to be cranky old witches.

    I've yet to take the #1 pitman apart to see if my theory is right. Just too many other sewing machines to get up and running. It's turn is coming.

    >>Learning to treadle:
    I've been told that you need rhythm to make a treadle go. I don't buy it. I had fits when I got the #1 treadle out of storage and began to use it. I couldn't make it go forwards without it stalling then reversing itself and breaking the thread on me. OH HOW FRUSTRATED I got. I got so hot under the collar once we thought the smoke alarm was going to to off.
    Then out of frustration I just put my left foot on the treadle plate and started spinning the hand wheel. I don't know how long I spun that hand wheel but while I was doing it I had a physical / mental epiphany. Suddenly my mind and foot understood what was needed and I took off like I knew what I was doing. Within a couple days of running the machine I could make it go and keep it going.
    For the most part I treadle bare foot or in socks. I just don't have the "feel" with shoes on.
    I have spinal arthritis and a messed up vertebra in my neck that causes my right side and leg to be a bit less coordinated than the left. So I treadle with my left foot mostly. Occasionally putting the right foot on as well, and even less occasionally using just the right foot. My right side tires very quickly and the foot just looses it's ability to do as I tell it. However, when I do get the treadle going I can sew almost as fast as my wife can sew on her electric machines. I just can't keep it up as long. Pant, pant, pant, pant.

    Hope this helps a bit.

    Oh and here's a funny thing ... My wife learned to sew on an electric machine. Since I've gotten the treadles up and running she's tried on every one of them and just cannot get the hang of it. She admits she prefers electric. I keep telling her she needs to learn how to treadle cos when TEOTWAWKI comes we'll have the treadles to fall back on.


    Joe

Page 1 of 2 1 2 LastLast

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

SEO by vBSEO ©2011, Crawlability, Inc.