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  • Vintage Japanese 'Badged' Zig Zag and Straight Sew Sewing Machines

    Old 08-11-2015, 12:08 PM
      #281  
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    Arrow Here is the picture

    The McKee Dressmaker.
    Attached Thumbnails img_8066.jpg   img_8065.jpg   img_8067.jpg  
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    Old 08-11-2015, 03:59 PM
      #282  
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    Other than the left home needles I like those old Japanese zzers - they have so much character.
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    Old 08-19-2015, 05:26 PM
      #283  
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    Hello,
    I found this post while trying to research my recent find. It's a fantastic source to see all the varieties of these different machines. I thought I'd add my own - and what little I know about it.

    For the search engines:
    It's "The White House" model, which I learned was a private label for an upscale department store. It's in great shape, and works effortlessly. On the machine it says 140, De Luxe, Zig Zag, Made in Japan, J-A13, and KZ 1.
    Z21 is stamped into the casting, and so is J 27.
    It has a Dynamic Sewing Motor that is color matched to the main body. It says MEW 115V, 0.8A

    I did look around and found a similar model, an Alden Deluxe ZigZag at Stagecoach Road Sewing.
    There's a video of that one as well:
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RWaf7WyVrF0
    [ATTACH=CONFIG]528232[/ATTACH] [ATTACH=CONFIG]528233[/ATTACH] [ATTACH=CONFIG]528234[/ATTACH] [ATTACH=CONFIG]528236[/ATTACH]

    This is my first sewing machine. I was looking for something to sew light automotive vinyls together; industrial machines seemed like 'too much machine' for me. I then started looking at the Sailrite mini walking foot machine, but when I spotted this, I had to have it. It has no needle yet, so I'll get on that this week. I'll test it out on some scraps.
    Should I be OK for light use or will I need to grab a 1.5A motor (maybe get a different machine all together?)


    I'd love to hear any further information on this machine, or maybe some thoughts on making it work for my use. I'll attach more pics for the archive.
    Attached Thumbnails img_3004.jpg   img_3002.jpg   img_2997.jpg   img_3010.jpg  

    Last edited by vortexblue; 08-19-2015 at 05:28 PM.
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    Old 08-19-2015, 05:33 PM
      #284  
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    [ATTACH=CONFIG]528239[/ATTACH] [ATTACH=CONFIG]528240[/ATTACH] [ATTACH=CONFIG]528241[/ATTACH] [ATTACH=CONFIG]528242[/ATTACH] [ATTACH=CONFIG]528243[/ATTACH] [ATTACH=CONFIG]528244[/ATTACH] [ATTACH=CONFIG]528245[/ATTACH] [ATTACH=CONFIG]528246[/ATTACH]
    Attached Thumbnails img_3023.jpg   img_3015.jpg   img_3014.jpg   img_3008.jpg   img_3007.jpg  

    img_3006.jpg   img_3005.jpg   img_2995.jpg  
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    Old 08-19-2015, 05:40 PM
      #285  
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    Give it a bit of oil in all the moving joints and you should be able to sew about anything you want for small projects. Extended use and you may want to go industrial. You may want to find a walking foot attachment to do your vinyl. A 1.0 motor is fairly heavy compared to most Singers at .5
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    Old 08-19-2015, 07:22 PM
      #286  
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    Noob question:
    When I'm shopping for feet and such, are these pretty much universal or specific to this type of machine? I think I've got a high shank foot (1" from base to screw).

    What do we call these machines when shopping for parts, 'Japanese clones'?
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    Old 08-20-2015, 01:50 AM
      #287  
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    check the parts on sew-classic - she tells how to know what foot you need
    it is called a Japanese sewing machine - the parts place should know
    some of the parts do interchange
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    Old 08-20-2015, 04:49 AM
      #288  
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    I found this, this morning and I thought that I would share it with the group. I found it on bestsewingmachinereviewed dot com. I think it will help explain our frustration in finding out who made a particular machine. This information would help Clone owners as well.
    ~G~

    What about J-A numbers and J-C numbers? Forget it! This was a system used by the manufactures that used identifiers like J-Axx and J-Cxx stamped on the underside of some of these machines, but no official information on this system was released to the public. Some collectors and repair people have tried to create a database of these numbers, but the results are incomplete and not accurate. The reason is that most of the manufactures would do overload work for other manufactures so a certain model of machine may have been produced by more than one manufacturer and at several different factories.
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    Old 08-20-2015, 12:19 PM
      #289  
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    Originally Posted by grant15clone
    I found this, this morning and I thought that I would share it with the group. I found it on bestsewingmachinereviewed dot com. I think it will help explain our frustration in finding out who made a particular machine. This information would help Clone owners as well.
    ~G~

    What about J-A numbers and J-C numbers? Forget it! This was a system used by the manufactures that used identifiers like J-Axx and J-Cxx stamped on the underside of some of these machines, but no official information on this system was released to the public. Some collectors and repair people have tried to create a database of these numbers, but the results are incomplete and not accurate. The reason is that most of the manufactures would do overload work for other manufactures so a certain model of machine may have been produced by more than one manufacturer and at several different factories.
    This makes a lot of sense. I'm also wondering if they got parts for the machines from a single source or not? So much of it is interchangeable...
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    Old 08-20-2015, 12:23 PM
      #290  
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    Originally Posted by miriam
    This makes a lot of sense. I'm also wondering if they got parts for the machines from a single source or not? So much of it is interchangeable...
    The article mentions that was the case.
    ~Grant~
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